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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Omission Handcrafted Lager Beer is Real Beer for Real Gluten-Free Beer Lovers

    During college I spent a year and a half living and studying in Tuebingen, Germany. This was before my diagnosis with celiac disease, and it was there that I really learned to know and love beer. After my diagnosis, and around the time I founded this Web site, I spent around two years trying to perfect a gluten-free beer made of sorghum and rice malts. I got close, but it never tasted quite right.

    Omission Handcrafted Lager BeerThe same can be said of many of the gluten-free beers that are made without using barley, which, according to Germany's 1516 "Reinheitgebot," or German Beer Purity Law, can't even be called "beer" in Germany.

    Omission Handcrafted Lager Beer, on the other hand, can be called real beer in Germany, as it is made using only traditional beer ingredients: malted barely, hops, yeast and water. How could it be safe for celiacs you ask? Because it is made using a process that removes the harmful gluten to below 10 ppm, and each batch is tested using an independent lab (utilizing the R5 Competitive ELISA test).

    So now, thanks to Omission Beer, I can once again enjoy the flavor of a real German-style beer. This wonderful lager beer stands on its own against any other great lager beer, and even those who are not gluten-free wouldn't notice that it was "different."

    Visit their site for more info: omissionbeer.com.

     

     

    Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.

     



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    Scott, I am not familiar with worldwide regulations, but for the US, I recommend that you read the May 24, 2012 ruling by the TTB (Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau) regarding gluten-free labeling. It prohibits the use of the term "gluten-free" on any beer derived from barley malt, even if it has been crafted to remove gluten.

     

    "....One of the following qualifying statements must also appear legibly and conspicuously on the label or in the advertisement as part of the above statement: “Product fermented from grains containing gluten and [processed or treated or crafted] to remove gluten.

    The gluten content of this product cannot be verified, and this product may contain gluten....â€

     

    Regarding the R5 Mendez Competitive Assay for gluten, this has not been approved by the FDA:

     

    "....Because the current tests used to measure the gluten content of fermented products have not been scientifically validated, such statements may not include any reference to the level of gluten in the product..."

     

    [i would post a link to the regulation, but this is not permitted by celiac.com. Details can be found by searching for: "Interim Policy on Gluten Content Statements in the Labeling and Advertising of Wines, Distilled Spirits, and Malt Beverages"].

     

    It is exciting that breweries are working on innovative approaches to remove gluten from barley-based beer, and the work looks very promising, but I agree with the TTB that it is premature to declare these as "gluten-free". I look forward to future research into valid methods for determining both "gluten" levels and the safety of complex protein mixtures.

     

    Peter Olins, PhD

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    Scott, I am not familiar with worldwide regulations, but for the US, I recommend that you read the May 24, 2012 ruling by the TTB (Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau) regarding gluten-free labeling. It prohibits the use of the term "gluten-free" on any beer derived from barley malt, even if it has been crafted to remove gluten.

     

    "....One of the following qualifying statements must also appear legibly and conspicuously on the label or in the advertisement as part of the above statement: “Product fermented from grains containing gluten and [processed or treated or crafted] to remove gluten.

    The gluten content of this product cannot be verified, and this product may contain gluten....â€

     

    Regarding the R5 Mendez Competitive Assay for gluten, this has not been approved by the FDA:

     

    "....Because the current tests used to measure the gluten content of fermented products have not been scientifically validated, such statements may not include any reference to the level of gluten in the product..."

     

    [i would post a link to the regulation, but this is not permitted by celiac.com. Details can be found by searching for: "Interim Policy on Gluten Content Statements in the Labeling and Advertising of Wines, Distilled Spirits, and Malt Beverages"].

     

    It is exciting that breweries are working on innovative approaches to remove gluten from barley-based beer, and the work looks very promising, but I agree with the TTB that it is premature to declare these as "gluten-free". I look forward to future research into valid methods for determining both "gluten" levels and the safety of complex protein mixtures.

     

    Peter Olins, PhD

    Your comments speak to labeling laws for alcoholic beverages--which Omission Beer is conforming to. Their beer does not say "gluten-free" on the label, even though it is.

    Scott

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    Scott, I am not familiar with worldwide regulations, but for the US, I recommend that you read the May 24, 2012 ruling by the TTB (Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau) regarding gluten-free labeling. It prohibits the use of the term "gluten-free" on any beer derived from barley malt, even if it has been crafted to remove gluten.

     

    "....One of the following qualifying statements must also appear legibly and conspicuously on the label or in the advertisement as part of the above statement: “Product fermented from grains containing gluten and [processed or treated or crafted] to remove gluten.

    The gluten content of this product cannot be verified, and this product may contain gluten....â€

     

    Regarding the R5 Mendez Competitive Assay for gluten, this has not been approved by the FDA:

     

    "....Because the current tests used to measure the gluten content of fermented products have not been scientifically validated, such statements may not include any reference to the level of gluten in the product..."

     

    [i would post a link to the regulation, but this is not permitted by celiac.com. Details can be found by searching for: "Interim Policy on Gluten Content Statements in the Labeling and Advertising of Wines, Distilled Spirits, and Malt Beverages"].

     

    It is exciting that breweries are working on innovative approaches to remove gluten from barley-based beer, and the work looks very promising, but I agree with the TTB that it is premature to declare these as "gluten-free". I look forward to future research into valid methods for determining both "gluten" levels and the safety of complex protein mixtures.

     

    Peter Olins, PhD

    Your comments speak to labeling laws for alcoholic beverages--which Omission Beer is conforming to. Their beer does not say "gluten-free" on the label, even though it is.

    Scott

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    Scott,

     

    Peter is right. Currently the science shows that it is premature to call Omission gluten free. Recent studies even suggest that it is not, and their current test underestimates gluten content in hydrolyzed products.

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    Scott,

     

    Peter is right. Currently the science shows that it is premature to call Omission gluten free. Recent studies even suggest that it is not, and their current test underestimates gluten content in hydrolyzed products.

    The Sandwich R5 ELISA has been shown to underestimate gluten content, but they are not using that test. They are using the Competitive R5 ELISA, which was specifically designed to test for hydrolyzed gluten.

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Celiac.com Sponsor: Review
    It is no coincidence that Goodie Girl's slogan is "Just the Right Amount of Wrong." The first thing I noticed when I put a Midnight Brownie gluten-free cookie in my mouth was a rush of intense chocolaty flavor, which was followed by a rich buttery taste.
    These cookies really are "Midnight" in color, and may be the blackest cookie I've ever seen (similar in color to the cookie part of an Oreo). I'll attribute their color to the rich ingredients used in making them, and their baking process. The chocolate chips in the cookies actually look light in color when compared to the rest of the cookie...if you can believe that!
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