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    This article is a paid advertising product review for this Web site. For more information about our advertising programs, including how you can see your ad on this site, please visit our advertising page.

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    Scott Adams
    Over the weekend my wife made a batch of Doodles Cookies Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookie Mix.  This gluten free cookie mix is very easy to prepare, and the gluten free cookies were ready in about 45 minutes, from start to finish.  We ended up with around two dozen very tasty chocolate chip cookies.  On top of their great taste, Doodles Cookies are all-natural and organic, and contain whole grain oat and brown rice flours as their base ingredients. 
    My entire family, including my two kids, really liked these cookies and would recommend them to anyone on a gluten-free diet...or not!
    For more info visit their Web site at: www.doodlescookies.com.

    Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.


    Scott Adams
    When I first opened the package of Squirrel’s Bakery Gluten-Free Coconut and Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars I was surprised by their unique shape: The package contained two bars that are approximately 2.5” x 3” and they are around an inch thick­so they resemble a brownie in size and shape.  They aren't kidding when they use the terms “thick & hearty” to describe these cookie bars.
    In addition to being gluten-free, Squirrel’s Bakery thick & hearty cookie bars are also soy, dairy and nut-free, so they will appeal to those of you who have additional food intolerances or allergies, as well as to those who have celiac disease.  The bars are made using quality ingredients like Bob’s Red Mill gluten-free oats, organic brown rice flour and Enjoy Life gluten, soy, dairy & nut free chocolate chips, and they are also a good source of fiber, iron, calcium and protein (the bars do contain eggs).
    The first thing I noticed when biting into the Squirrel’s Gluten-Free Coconut and Chocolate Chip bar is the large coconut flakes, which tasted wonderful.  This taste was enhanced by the wonderful combination of their allergy-friendly chocolate chips, along with their blend of gluten-free flours and oats.  The texture was very nice, it was not too moist and not too dry­I’ve never been a fan of overly-soft cookies or bars. 
    The last question that must be answered about this excellent gluten-free “cookie”: Could I get used to eating “cookie bars” instead of regular old cookies?  Sure…I really can't imagine anyone who would not enjoy these special treats!  They should please the most die hard cookie lovers, and offer a unique take on a traditional treat. 
    Squirrel’s Bakery is a small family owned cookie manufacturing business based in Virginia Beach, Virginia and was founded in 2009.  For more information, you can visit their Web site at www.squirrelsbakery.com.
     
     
    Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.


    Celiac.com Sponsor: Review
    The Bakery at Walmart Gluten-Free Chocolate Brownies
    If you enjoy rich, moist and super chocolaty brownies, then you are going to absolutely love The Bakery Gluten-Free Chocolate Brownies. It has been a long time since I've had brownies that taste this great.
    The Bakery Gluten-Free Chocolate Brownies are clearly made for the true chocolate brownie lover in you, and I am very impressed with the wonderful texture and flavors that come through in every bite.
    Another thing I like about these brownies is their size—they are about two large bites each, and 12 of them come in each box. If you have very strong self control you will only eat 2 or 3 of them...but if not...who knows?
    The Bakery Gluten-Free Chocolate Brownies are available in the bakery section of your local Walmart.
    For more info visit: http://www.walmart.com/ip/The-Bakery-at-Wal-Mart-Gluten-Free-Chocolate-Brownies-12-count-8.04-oz/40556797 

     
     
     
    Review written by Scott Adams.


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    Thank you so much, cyclinglady. Yes, very helpful! I want to tell her the exact tests I want.  I am thinking I should request: tTG-IgA Total serum IgA Do you agree? I am on a super high-deductible health plan, so I end up paying for all of these, so I don't want to go overboard while still being as sure as I can be. Not related to celiac (as far as I know) but I was also reminded that my sister has the MTHFR gene mutation (homozygous C variant), so I need to ask her to be tested for that as well... She is going to think I am nuts, and that is fine. ;)
    Oh no!  One celiac test?  Only one was given?  The TTG IgA, I assume or you just got the Immunoglobulin A (IGA) test?  You should insist on the complete celiac panel.  You should also know that  some people with DH do not test positive on any of the celiac blood tests.  If your skin biopsies are negative, make sure they biopsy was taken correctly — not on the rash, but adjacent.  This mistake is make ALL THE TIME by dermatologists.   Because of what you disclosed in another post, you should consider asking a Gastroenterologist and not your GP (who seems to know little about celiac disease and testing) why you had small intestinal damage (per initial biopsies) went gluten free and later a second biopsy revealed a healed small intestine, yet you were not given a celiac diagnosis.   Later, it seems you started consuming gluten again or were getting traces of gluten into your diet, and now may have developed or worsened your DH. Quote: “Hi, I have been trying to get a celiac diagnosis for awhile now. I had an endoscopy years ago that showed flatted villi but the biopsy said "possible sprue or possible duodonitis." I went g.f. and had another test a few years later. The villi were normal but I had what I thought was a d.h. rash. The dermatologist said it did not look like d.h. and said it was just eczema.  To test myself, I started eating gluten again. I have occasional bowel issues but not like I had years ago.” Now my legs look like I have d.h. again.” You can go gluten free and safely prepare gluten in your house.  I did this for 12 years when my hubby was gluten free and before I was shockingly diagnosed.  You just can not ingest gluten.  The only thing you need to avoid is flour because flour has been documented to stay in the air or fall on surfaces for up to 24 hours (one reason not to have a coffee in a bakery or donut shop — sit outside!)  You can cook pasta, make sandwiches, open a box of cookies....whatever!  Just do not use loose flour.   If he needs a birthday cake, have a friend bake it at their house.  Or he may love a gluten-free cake.  Soon I will be baking my kid a gluten-free Chocolate Mayonnaise Cake for her birthday and she is not celiac!  She actually prefers it to a gluten-containing bakery cake!   There are plenty of alternate grains besides wheat, barley and rye for your son.  Think outside the box.   I have said this before you should get your son tested for celiac disease.  I have allergies and I never had a positive for wheat.  Wheat allergies and celiac disease are separate issues.  He may very well have celiac disease.  Why?  Because his mom had a positive intestinal biopsy and went gluten free and then had a repeat intestinal biopsy and healed.  I am not a doctor, but that is pretty damning evidence.  Maybe you need to consult with an attorney who specializes in malpractice.  You appear to have been put through a diagnostic nightmare.   I hope this helps.  Mothers need to take care of themselves first, so that they can help their children.  It is like the oxygen masks on an airplane.  Adults are instructed to put their mask on first before assisting others (e.g. children).        
    Some people with DH do lousy on the blood antibody tests.  They hoard all their gliaden antibodies in their skin instead of their bloodstream.  So they may test negative on blood antibodies but still have plenty of antibodies in the skin.  Sometimes they even flunk the endoscopy tests for the same reason.
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