• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    74,535
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Pjb
    Newest Member
    Pjb
    Joined
  • Announcements

    • Scott Adams

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
  • 2 2

    Can a Simple and Inexpensive Blood Test Predict Foods That Trigger Autoimmunity? Alcat Food Allergy Testing


    Advertising Banner-Ads


    • The Alcat Test offered by Cell Science Systems, Corp., measures the response of innate immune cells following exposure to foods and other substances.


    Celiac.com 04/01/2018 - Scientists at Yale reported in April in the journal, NUTRITION & METABOLISM, in a paper entitled, A Leukocyte Activation Test Identifies Food Items Which Induce Release of DNA by Innate Immune Peripheral Blood Leukocytes, that the Alcat Test, a blood test for identifying patient specific reactions to foods and chemicals, may help doctors and patients unveil a hidden cause of autoimmune and other inflammation related conditions.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    The scientists studied various immunological phenomena associated with cellular reactions measured by the Alcat Test, wherein a patient’s blood is exposed to specific food extracts and a sensitive instrument records innate immune cell responses. The Yale researchers, led by the late Dr. Ather Ali, ND, MPH, and Wajahat Mehal, M.D., Ph.D., had previously reported that diets determined by Alcat testing significantly reduce symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). (bmjopengastro.bmj.com/content/4/1/e000164)

    The investigators wondered if this improvement in IBS symptoms is linked to release of DNA from activated white blood cells. Numerous studies from various institutions have found that DNA released from activated immune cells trigger inflammatory responses.

    The Yale team did find that positive Alcat reactions are associated with a greater release of DNA than are Alcat Test, “non-reactive” foods. They also identified the immunological pathway most involved, Protein Kinase C (PKC) as well as the primary cell type initiating the reactivity; the eosinophil. Activation of this cell type, and this pathway, are often associated with aberrant immune responses. Epigenetic studies show that foods modify gene expression and, quite possibly, the immune system can recognize foods that do so negatively.

    The findings suggest that dietary triggers may play a role in wide ranging and disparate inflammation associated disorders; such as, multiple sclerosis, gastro enteropathies, asthma, arthritis, metabolic syndrome (obesity, cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes) inflammation of the liver and other target organs, dementia, eczema, psoriasis, and eosinophilic esophagitis, to name a few.

    With the costly and dramatic rise in recent years in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, for which there are many treatments, some having serious side effects, but very few real cures, an inexpensive preventive approach involving a scientifically directed personalized diet could provide a powerful adjunct to existing medical therapies.

    The Alcat Test is manufactured and performed by Cell Science Systems, Corp. (CSS) at their laboratory in Deerfield Beach, FL. “The advantage of the Alcat Test is that it’s quick, simple, and inexpensive. It’s the only test for food sensitivities (not allergies, but, “sensitivities”) to have been clinically validated,” says Cell Science Systems’ CEO, Roger Deutsch. “Unlike genetic tests for dietary guidance, that provide only general information as to how someone may react to a particular food; or, antibody tests, which only show previous exposure to a food, but not active sensitivity, the Alcat Test shows a person’s actual, real time, biological cellular response to the foods in question,” he adds. “The results are much more accurate and have been confirmed by double blind challenges, the gold standard for this type of testing.”

    The Alcat Test offered by Cell Science Systems, Corp., measures the response of innate immune cells following exposure to foods and other substances.  It's been validated in studies from Yale School of Medicine and other institutions. In recognition of Celiac Awareness Month, now thru May 31, Cell Science Systems will offer a free genetic screen for celiac genes (HLA DQ 2 and DQ8) when you purchase an Alcat Test. Cover all bases! Go to GutHealth.com or, CellScienceSystems.com for details; or, call 1(800) US-ALCAT – (800) 872 5228.

    For more info visit their site.


    2 2


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I did the alcat test many years ago $500 and it was so inaccurate .......I could only eat 2 foods in the green column even though just like the example image of the test it shows many supposedly safe foods ..... Igg testing dosent work ....as everyones blood has an igg response after eating .....only ige (true allergy) testing is of value .....sensitivities are another thing entirely.Do not waste your time and money.

    steve

    maybe they have changed how they test ?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   4 Members, 1 Anonymous, 256 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams


    Introduction
    Through his writings, we know that Hippocrates, the father of medicine, had already recognized the presence of allergic reactions in people as early as ancient times. However, the term allergy is a relatively new one, as compared to many other commonly used medical terms. In 1906, Viennese pediatrician Baron Clemens von Pirquet used the term for the first time to describe an altered response of his patients bodies. Von Pirquet believed that this altered reaction manifested itself in changes of the immune system, effected by external influences on the body, such as: food intake, the air breathed or direct skin contact. The term allergen (the substance responsible for the altered reaction) was born. At that point in time, however, von Pirquet had no means of scientifically proving that these immunological changes actually occurred in the body. It was not until the mid-1920s, that a second significant event occurred.
    Researchers found that, by injecting a minute quantity of purified allergen under the skin, certain individuals would develop a clear skin response; a welt, with or without itching and redness, could be provoked. This positive skin test for allergies would show itself most prominently in patients with hay fever, asthma, chronic rhinitis, hives and eczema. The prick test became a method of demonstrating the involvement of the immune system in allergic reactions. However, the precise biological reason for the reaction continued to remain a mystery.
    It was not until the Sixties, when an important discovery occurred which provided long-awaited scientific support for the classical allergy theory and removed any doubts about the relationship of the immune system with allergies. This breakthrough came about with the scientific discovery of immunoglobulin E (IgE) by a Japanese couple named Ishizaka.
    Classical Allergic Reaction
    The following are the chain of events which happen in allergic reactions:
    An allergen must be present in the body. This allergen is the substance which causes us to have an abnormal immunological response. Allergens tend to be protein molecules. Interestingly enough, the immune system only detects particles of a certain size as potential troublemakers and protein molecules are just the right size. In a small number of cases, the body actually responds to molecules other than proteins. These molecules, which are generally much smaller, are called haptens. By combining with protein molecules, haptens form larger complexes which can then be detected by the immune system. The allergen is detected by the B cells. These are specialized immune cells, capable of producing antibodies. Just like allergens, antibodies are protein molecules, which have the capacity to neutralize allergens. Every B cell produces its own, specific antibody, depending on the type of intruder it needs to respond to. It is easy to understand why the body must have a ready pool of millions of antibodies, in order to combat these numerous offenders. There are five main categories of antibodies (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD and IgE) which the body releases under different circumstances (for instance to fight off various infections, etc.). In the case of allergies, the body produces the antibody immunoglobulin E (IgE), first discovered by the Ishizakas. Usually, antibodies will bind directly to the appropriate damaging substance and neutralize it. However, IgE deviates from this common path. It first attaches one of its legs to one of the bodys numerous mast cells. The other leg is used to hold on to the offending allergen. This action signals the mast cells to begin disintegrating, thereby releasing histamine. Histamine is a chemical substance responsible for a great number of complaints which may arise during allergic reactions. It causes muscle cramps and an inflammation-like process with redness and swelling of mucous membranes.
    Allergic reactions can occur under a variety of circumstances. For instance, inhaling certain substances, such as grass pollen, house dust, etc., may cause an allergic response. However, the consumption of certain foods may do the same. Allergies typically bring on complaints very rapidly upon contact with the allergen. Complaints may vary from a runny nose, sinusitis, earache or runny eyes to itching of the skin, eczema and shortness of breath.

    Intolerance
    Conventional medicine can easily diagnose and treat allergies for foods or inhalants. Here, the so-called RAST test plays a very important role, because this test can demonstrate the presence of IgE.
    However, demonstrating the presence of intolerance is more difficult. In this situation, similar to the case of classical allergies, the body responds abnormally and, in addition, the immune system does not produce IgE. It quite often takes much longer for complaints to come on, thereby masking the possible link between the offensive substance and the complaints themselves.
    These are only a few of the reasons why food intolerance is considered a fairly controversial concept in conventional medicine. Intolerance can be responsible for a wide variety of complaints which, at first glance, seem to lack a plausible explanation. Intolerance can manifest themselves as the following:
    Gastrointestinal complaints: stomach ache, irritable bowel, Crohns disease, ulcerative colitis Skin complaints: itching, eczema, hives, acne (in adults) Joint and muscle complaints: ranging from atypical pains to rheumatoid arthritis Headache and migraine Chronic fatigue Asthma, chronic rhinitis or sinusitis Pre-menstrual syndrome Hypoglycemia Depression, anxiety Sleeping disorders
    Diagnosing Intolerance
    It is impossible to accurately demonstrate intolerance through conventional testing methods.
    The Amsterdam Clinic currently uses the following test, which is very reliable.
    Another useful test is the IgG(4) antibody test. Here, the presence of IgG(4) antibodies is determined. These antibodies are the slowly occurring variety, which do not appear in the blood until 24 to 48 hours after exposure to an offending food or substance. The reliability of this test varies between 80 and 90%.
    Treatment
    Diet
    In the treatment of inhalant allergies (such as asthma, hay fever) and food allergies and intolerance, avoidance (elimination) of allergens plays an extremely important role. In the case of food sensitivities, either the cytotoxic test or IgG(4) test can help determine reactions to specific foods. Based on the test results, an elimination/rotation diet can be specifically tailored.
    Foods causing strong reactions in these tests, should (temporarily) be excluded from the diet. More moderate reactions allow for rotation of certain food items in the diet. These may be eaten once every four days. Especially during the first week(s) of the diet, withdrawal symptoms, similar to complaints stemming from the cessation of coffee, tobacco or alcohol consumption, may occur. The body seems to crave offending food items. Generally, these withdrawal symptoms disappear after a couple of weeks. Concurrently, those complaints relating to food sensitivity also diminish.
    Using this dietary approach, the reaction to food allergens may decrease in the course of time. After a three month moratorium, reintroduction of forbidden food items can be attempted, one at a time. In this way, food items still causing reactions can be isolated more easily. Often, at least part of existing intolerance completely disappear after an elimination/rotation diet.
    With the treatment for inhalant allergies, elimination is also the first step. It is obvious that patients having an allergy for cats or dogs, should avoid any contact with these pets. The situation becomes more difficult when dealing with allergies to grass or tree pollen, since total elimination is basically impossible. The same goes for house dust mite allergy. The house dust mite lives in mattresses, pillows, carpeting, drapes, upholstery, etc. Through mite-killing pesticides, special mattress and pillow covers, non-carpeted floors, etc. reasonable results can be obtained.
    Medication
    Medicines for inhalant allergies, such as antihistamines (Triludan), corticosteroids (Prednisone, Pulmicort, Becotide), cromoglycates (Lomudal, Lomusol), and airway dilating medication (Ventolin, Berotec, Atrovent) do suppress symptoms, however, they do not cure the allergy! In the realm of conventional medicine, effective medications for food allergy and intolerance do not exist at all.
    Desensitisation
    Enzyme-potentiated desensitisation (EPD) and the provocation/neutralization method are very effective treatments for food allergy/intolerance and inhalant allergy problems. These methods tackle allergy problems at the root.
    During EPD treatment, a small quantity of a food or inhalant allergen mixture is injected intradermally into the skin, in conjunction with the enzyme beta-glucuronidase. This combination causes the body to gradually adjust its exaggerated responses to food and inhalant allergens. In this way, the immune system is readjusted and reset. Initially, the injections have to be given once every two months. Gradually, however, the intervals between injections become longer and the injections can often be discontinued after a time. According to conservative estimates, at least 80% of those patients treated with EPD show considerable improvement in the course of time. Provocation/neutralization can be used both diagnostically and therapeutically. Here, separate extracts of food or inhalants, suspected as possibly offending, are injected intradermally. This causes a welt to appear in the skin. After 10 minutes, the size and nature (firmness, color, etc.) of the welt are evaluated. A positive welt will generally bring on symptoms (provocation). Depending on the size and nature of the welt, as well as, the presence of symptoms, varying concentrations are injected, until a dose is found which does not cause any welt changes or symptoms. This is the neutralizing dose. Injections with the proper neutralizing dose will bring on immediate protection against the symptoms caused by the offending food and/or inhalant. Copyright © 1996 the Amsterdam Klikiek
    For further information please contact:
    Also in THE NETHERLANDS:
    Amsterdam Kliniek
    Reigersbos 100
    1107 ES Amsterdam Z.O.
    Telephone 31 (0)20 697 53 61
    Telefax 31 (0)20 697 53 67
    Lydia S. Boeken M.D. London/Amsterdam

    Scott Adams
    The following was a post from Merete Askim regarding the avoidance of the contamination of foods during the manufacturing process. If you have any questions regarding it, direct them to him at: Merete.Askim@INF.HIST.NO.
    My name is Merete Askim, and I am a College Lecturer at the Department of Food Science, Soer-Tronedelag College, Trondheim, Norway. In my teaching in nutrition and food chemistry, I am very interested in food allergy and intolerance. My students get jobs as food technologists, so it is important for them to be aware of food allergy and intolerance.
    I have invented a new concept which I call ALLERGY-HYGIENICS.
    This combines both the aspects of avoiding contamination by:
    Harmful Bacteria Ingredients Not Meant to be Part of the Food in Question A traditional concept in industrial food production is called HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Points), which is concerned primarily with bacterial contamination. My new concept ALLERGY-HYGIENIC improves upon HACCP, by adding the concept of consideration of allergic and intolerant ingredients, either directly through insufficient consideration of the impact of an ingredient on the population, or inadvertently through contamination by ingredients not meant to be part of the food in question.
    We teach the students to start the analysis of food production with the least complex product, and end with the most complex, to have knowledge of every ingredient, down to the smallest, including the food-additives.
    For example, some firms use vacuum tubes to deliver ingredients from storage facilities to their production machinery. If a gluten free product is being made, and the tube used to deliver rice flour was previously used to deliver wheat flour, there is likely cross-contamination which cannot be removed by simply cleaning the final production machinery. The tube itself would have to be cleaned out, or the facility would have to be designed so that gluten free flours are never transported in tubes which at other times contain gluten.
    Another example is when a dairy produces both "strawberry-yogurt" and "raspberry -yogurt" on the same day, the ALLERGY-HYGIENIC concept is to avoid any strawberry contamination in the raspberry product, or vice versa.
    Our goal is that all products will eventually have ALLERGY-HYGIENIC qualities!
    But we know this takes time and can be expensive in some occasions. It is a new concept in the traditional way of hygienic thinking. Even with ALLERGY-HYGIENICS, we can not guarantee no contamination, but we are attentive, and take our precautions.
    At our Department of Food Science, Trondheim, Norway, want this new concept ALLERGY-HYGIENIC to catch-on all over the world, and become common knowledge. So please tell others, and if you dont mind, remember that it was created here.
    When you are in contact with the food-industry, you might ask them:
    Is your production in accordance with ALLERGY-HYGIENIC principles? Have you taken ALLERGY-HYGIENIC considerations in your production? If you find this concept useful, please let me know by private email. I would also be interested in your experiences as Celiacs with locating cross-contamination in foods. By cataloging your real-life experiences in the field, I can help my students and their companies determine likely problematic areas in food production.
    Merete Askim: Tel (work): 47 73 91 96 25
    N-7004 Trondheim, Norway

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/01/2011 - The global market for food allergy and intolerance products will surpass $26 billion by 2017, according to the most recent projections from companiesandmarkets.com.
    The retail growth in foods free of gluten, wheat, lactose, cow's milk, nuts, egg, soy and ominous additives has been driven in part by increased diagnosis of digestive health conditions, growing interest for gluten-free diets, better label regulations, and tastier products.
    The United States is by far biggest market for food allergy and intolerance products. In the U.S., an estimated 10% of the population have difficulties digesting gluten.
    In addition to their popularity with celiac-disease sufferers, gluten-free foods also appeal to a wide proportion of the general population, partly because of growing concerns related wheat consumption, and to symptoms associated with celiac disease.
    The sector is also benefiting from numerous celebrities who have touted gluten-free and wheat-free diets as apart of a weight-loss and personal fitness routine.
    Others are swayed by claims that going gluten-free can help treat disorders such as autism, chronic fatigue, schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder, multiple sclerosis, migraine and fertility problems.
    At least partly in response to that fact, market for gluten-free products began to explode in 2010, with savory snacks, energy bars, baking products, chocolates, and cookies leading the way among new gluten-free products.
    One result is that consumers now have a variety of options to choose from in the baked products category, including baking mixes, breads, bagels, muffins, entrees, cakes, cookies, doughnuts, baking mixes, pastas, pizza, cereals, snack foods and soups. This, in addition to a number of new gluten-free grains, starches, flours and seeds.
    Online sites that specialize in delivering gluten-free and other specialty foods for for those with food allergies, such as The Gluten-free Mall have added upwards of a hundred new products and twenty new vendors a year, and expect those numbers to continue, according to its founder and CEO, Scott Adams.
    The report includes comprehensive marketplace information, including analysis of key players, products, and strategic activities, trends, product launches, innovation, and regulatory issues, along with historic and forecast data covering 2003-2017.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/08/2013 - In an article for Fox News, Hans von Spakovsky, a senior fellow at the right-wing Heritage Foundation, ridicules the idea that the Department of Justice (DoJ) should use its weight to force colleges and universities to accommodate students with food allergies under the Americans with Disabilities Act.
    At issue is a settlement the DoJ obtained with Lesley University in Massachusetts, which had allegedly violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by not adequately accommodating students with food allergies.
    Under the settlement agreement with the DoJ, Lesley University will pay $50,000, offer meals that do not contain “egg, wheat, shellfish, fish, soy, peanut, tree-nut products, and other potential allergens," prepare the food in a dedicated area, and to allow students to pre-order their special meals, among other requirements.
    In the view of von Spakovsky, the agreement amounts to "extortion" by the the DoJ. He calls the "idea that this is a federal issue, or that the Justice Department should burn its resources investigating food preparation in university dining halls…a complete absurdity."
    He goes onto call the DOJ's efforts at Lesley a "dish-hunt [which] exemplifies mindless mission creep and the bloated expansion of the federal nanny state."
    What do you think? Do you have children or loved ones with celiac disease, especially of college age? Should celiac disease be considered a disability? Do they deserve gluten-free food options at school? Should the government pressure schools that either can't or won't act on their own? Let us know your thoughts by commenting below.
    Click here to read Hans von Spakovsky's full article, ridiculing efforts by the federal government to use the Americans with Disabilities Act to pressure colleges to accommodate students with food allergies.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/26/2018 - If you haven’t tried a savory pancake, then you’ve been missing out. In many places in the world, savory pancakes are more common than the sweet pancakes. They make a great lunch or dinner twist. This gluten-free version combines scallions and peas, but feel free to add or subtract veggies at will. Serve pancakes them warm with butter for a delicious twist on lunch or dinner.
    Ingredients:
    3 large eggs 1 cup cottage cheese ½ stick salted butter, melted ¼ cup all-purpose gluten-free flour 2 tablespoons vegetable oil plus more for skillet 1 cup shelled fresh or frozen peas, thawed 4 scallions, thinly sliced, plus more for serving 1 teaspoon kosher salt plus more, as desired Directions:
    If using fresh peas, blanch the peas about 3 minutes in a small saucepan of boiling salted water until tender, about 3 minutes (don’t cook frozen peas). Drain well.
    In a blender, add eggs, cottage cheese, flour, 2 tablespoons oil, and 1 teaspoon salt, and purée until smooth. 
    Transfer batter to a medium bowl and stir in peas and scallions. 
    Batter should be thick but pourable; stir in water by tablespoonfuls if too thick.
    Heat a lightly oiled large nonstick skillet over medium heat. 
    Working in batches, add batter to skillet by ¼-cupfuls to form 3-inch-4-inch rounds. 
    Cook pancakes about 3 minutes, until bubbles form on top. 
    Flip and cook until pancakes are browned on bottom and the centers are just cooked through, about 2 minutes longer.
    Serve pancakes drizzled with butter and topped with scallions.
    Inspired by bonappetit.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/25/2018 - People with celiac disease need to follow a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, once their guts have healed, they can still be sensitive to gluten. Sometimes even more sensitive than they were before they went gluten-free. Accidental ingestion of gluten can trigger symptoms in celiac patients, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, and can also cause intestinal damage. 
    A new drug being developed by a company called Amgen eases the effects of people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Researchers working on the drug have announced that their proof-of-concept study shows AMG 714, an anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, potentially protects celiac patients from inadvertent gluten exposure by blocking interleukin 15, an important mediator of celiac disease, and leads to fewer symptoms following gluten exposure.
    The drug is intended for people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet, and is designed to protect against modest gluten contamination, not to permit consumption of large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.
    AMG 714 is not designed for celiac patients to eat gluten at will, but for small, incidental contamination. Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, study director and consultant for Amgen, says that their team is looking at AMG 714 “for its potential to protect against modest contamination, not deliberately eating large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.” 
    Amgen hopes that AMG 714 will help celiac patients on a gluten-free diet to experience fewer or less sever gluten-triggered events.
    Findings of the team’s first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week 2018. 
    Read more at ScienceDaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/24/2018 - England is facing some hard questions about gluten-free food prescriptions for people with celiac disease. Under England’s National Health Plan, people with celiac disease are eligible for gluten-free foods as part of their medical treatment. 
    The latest research shows that prescription practice for gluten-free foods varies widely, and often seems independent of medical factors. This news has put those prescribing practices under scrutiny.
    "Gluten free prescribing is clearly in a state of flux at the moment, with an apparent rapid reduction in prescribing nationally," say the researchers. Their data analysis revealed that after a steady increase in prescriptions between 1998 and 2010, the prescription rate for gluten free foods has both fallen, and become more variable, in recent years. Not only is there tremendous variation in gluten free prescribing, say the researchers, “this variation appears to exist largely without good reason…”
    Worse still, the research showed that those living in the most deprived areas of the country are the least likely to be prescribed gluten-free products, possibly due to a lower rate of celiac diagnosis in disadvantaged groups, say the researchers.
    But following a public consultation, the government decided earlier this year to restrict the range of gluten free products rather than banning them outright. As research data pile up and gluten-free food becomes cheaper and more ubiquitous, look for more changes to England’s gluten-free prescription program to follow. 
    Read more about this research in the online journal BMJ Open.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/23/2018 - Yes, we at Celiac.com realize that rye bread is not gluten-free, and is not suitable for consumption by people with celiac disease!  That is also true of rye bread that is low in FODMAPs.
    FODMAPs are Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. FODMAPS are molecules found in food, and can be poorly absorbed by some people. Poor FODMAP absorption can cause celiac-like symptoms in some people. FODMAPs have recently emerged as possible culprits in both celiac disease and in irritable bowel syndrome.
    In an effort to determine what, if any, irritable bowel symptoms may triggered by FODMAPs, a team of researchers recently set out to compare the effects of regular vs low-FODMAP rye bread on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and to study gastrointestinal conditions with SmartPill.
    A team of researchers compared low-FODMAP rye bread with regular rye bread in patients irritable bowel syndrome, to see if rye bread low FODMAPs would reduce hydrogen excretion, lower intraluminal pressure, raise colonic pH, improve transit times, and reduce IBS symptoms compared to regular rye bread. The research team included Laura Pirkola, Reijo Laatikainen, Jussi Loponen, Sanna-Maria Hongisto, Markku Hillilä, Anu Nuora, Baoru Yang, Kaisa M Linderborg, and Riitta Freese.
    They are variously affiliated with the Clinic of Gastroenterology; the Division of Nutrition, Department of Food and Environmental Sciences; the Medical Faculty, Pharmacology, Medical Nutrition Physiology, University of Helsinki in Helsinki, Finland; the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University, Hospital Jorvi in Espoo, Finland; with the Food Chemistry and Food Development, Department of Biochemistry, University of Turku inTurku, Finland; and with the Fazer Group/ Fazer Bakeries Ltd in Vantaa, Finland.
    The team wanted to see if rye bread low in FODMAPs would cause reduced hydrogen excretion, lower intraluminal pressure, higher colonic pH, improved transit times, and fewer IBS symptoms than regular rye bread. 
    To do so, they conducted a randomized, double-blind, controlled cross-over meal study. For that study, seven female IBS patients ate study breads at three consecutive meals during one day. The diet was similar for both study periods except for the FODMAP content of the bread consumed during the study day.
    The team used SmartPill, an indigestible motility capsule, to measure intraluminal pH, transit time, and pressure. Their data showed that low-FODMAP rye bread reduced colonic fermentation compared with regular rye bread. They found no differences in pH, pressure, or transit times between the breads. They also found no difference between the two in terms of conditions in the gastrointestinal tract.
    They did note that the gastric residence of SmartPill was slower than expected. SmartPill left the stomach in less than 5 h only once in 14 measurements, and therefore did not follow on par with the rye bread bolus.
    There's been a great deal of interest in FODMAPs and their potential connection to celiac disease and gluten-intolerance. Stay tuned for more information on the role of FODMAPs in celiac disease and/or irritable bowel syndrome.
    Source:
    World J Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 21; 24(11): 1259–1268.doi:  10.3748/wjg.v24.i11.1259

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
    For a couple of decades now, scientists have been searching for a biological Rosetta stone that would allow them to engineer proteins with precision, but the problem has remained dauntingly complex.  Researchers had a pretty good understanding of the very simple way that the linear chemical code carried by strands of DNA translates into strings of amino acids in proteins. 
    But, one of the main problems in protein engineering has to do with the way proteins fold into their various three-dimensional structures. Until recently, no one has been able to decipher the rules that will predict how proteins fold into those three-dimensional structures.  So even if researchers were somehow able to design a protein with the right shape for a given job, they wouldn’t know how to go about making it from protein’s building blocks, the amino acids.
    But now, scientists like William DeGrado, a chemist at the University of California, San Francisco, and David Baker, director for the Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington, say that designing proteins will become at least as important as manipulating DNA has been in the past couple of decades.
    After making slow, but incremental progress over the years, scientists have improved their ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes. Among other things, they’ve gained a better understanding of how then the laws of physics cause the proteins to snap into folded origami-like structures based on the ways amino acids are attracted or repelled by others many places down the chain.
    It is this new ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes that has fueled their progress. UCSF’s DeGrado is using these new breakthroughs to search for new medicines that will be more stable, both on the shelf and in the body. He is also looking for new ways to treat Alzheimer’s disease and similar neurological conditions, which result when brain proteins fold incorrectly and create toxic deposits.
    Meanwhile, Baker’s is working on a single vaccine that would protect against all strains of the influenza virus, along with a method for breaking down the gluten proteins in wheat, which could help to generate new treatments for people with celiac disease. 
    With new computing power, look for progress on the understanding, design, and construction of brain proteins. As understanding, design and construction improve, look for brain proteins to play a major role in disease research and treatment. This is all great news for people looking to improve our understanding and treatment of celiac disease.
    Source:
    Bloomberg.com