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  • ChildLife Essentials: A Foundation For Health

      We are very proud of this product line and are deeply committed to promoting improved nutrition for children as a foundation for good health and well-being.

    Celiac.com 04/24/2019 - We now live in a society where much of our population, including our children, are overfed but undernourished. Dietary supplements can play an important role in closing the nutritional gap. 

    For a child’s body to develop normally, essential nutrients need to be consumed each and every day. Children need vitamins and minerals for their normal growth and for the nourishment of their organs and bones. This can be quite a task, especially since many young children are picky about the foods they eat. A good way to be sure children get the nutrients required to produce a healthy body and brain is to give them a daily multivitamin and mineral.

    Multivitamin supplements in the form of liquids or drops, are often the best option for children who are sometimes unable to swallow a tablet. And there are other advantages: 
    Liquid supplements allow a multivitamin/mineral to be mixed with food or a child’s favorite beverage and make it easier to take, regardless of the child’s age
    Often liquids contain higher doses of active ingredients and lower levels of sugar
    Liquid formulas allow for greater bioavailability and absorption of the nutrients

    Unfortunately, most multi liquid formulas include only the vitamins, not the minerals, needed for healthy development at a young age. But you can count on ChildLife Liquid Multi Vitamin and Mineral to supply all the primary minerals as well.

    In addition, ChildlLife Multivitamin & Mineral contains Calcium, Iodine, Magnesium, Selenium, Manganese, Potassium, Chromium & Potassium as well as Choline and Inositol for healthy brain neurotransmitter support. And like all our products, ChildLife Multivitamin & Mineral is gluten free, casein free, alcohol free with no artificial colorings, flavorings or sweeteners. It is a complete multi formula you can be comfortable and confident giving your child. 

    For more info visit: Visit Our Site.


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  • Related Articles

    Maria Lerario
    Gluten-Free Grocery Store Bread Reviewed
    Celiac.com 11/17/2015 - For most people, when they think of gluten, the first thing that comes to mind is bread. And for most people with celiac or a gluten sensitivity, that is what we miss most.
    While people with celiac or gluten sensitivity may never be able to experience the wide selection or soft texture that "glutenous" bread offers, there are still some tasty gluten-free bread options available at most grocery stores. In order to find the best gluten-free bread options, I went to my local Giant Eagle and tried all of the gluten-free bread available and explored four main aspects: taste, texture, price, and variety.
    The three brands of gluten-free bread offered at Giant Eagle were Schar, Udi's, and Goodbye Gluten.
    In the variety category, Udi's offered the largest selection of bread with the choice of white bread, multigrain bread, cinnamon raisin bread, and millet-chia bread and omega flax and fiber bread. Udi's also offers a large variety of other products ranging from muffins and cookies, to pizza crusts and tortillas.
    While Udi's may have the largest variety of the three brands, Schar offered a few different kinds of bread as well, with a cinnamon raisin and multigrain option along with an assortment of rolls.
    In the category of price, Goodbye Gluten came in as the most inexpensive per ounce at $0.27 per ounce. Udi's was in the middle $0.37 per oz. and Schar was the most expensive of the three, coming in at $0.40 per oz.
    Now let's get down to business. Taste and texture—the two aspects that are hardest to get right when making gluten-free bread. In my opinion, Udi's won both categories with the tastiness, most normal textured bread. My only critique was the slices of bread weren't big enough! All three brands seemed to have their slices of bread on the smaller side, but Udi's bread seemed to be especially small.
    Although Udi's took the first prize in three of the four categories, that is not to say the other two brands were not good. I was impressed with all three brands, but my main critique covers the texture category.
    The Goodbye Gluten bread seemed to be very dense, and while most gluten-free bread crumbles more than normal, I felt that the Goodbye Gluten loaf broke easier than the other two. However, it was very moist, something that is hard to come by in gluten-free bread.
    With the Schar bread, I felt that it was a little dry and grainy rather than moist and chewy like normal gluten filled bread. However, I found that when I toasted the bread, it had a texture more consistent with normal toast.
    Overall, I was satisfied with all three brands, but Udi's was the favorite. With the texture and taste being spot on, I did not need much else to convince me, but the added bonus of the reasonable price and large variety made it the most desirable gluten-free bread available.

    Celiac.com Sponsor: Banner
    GliadinX Breaks Down Gluten in the Gut
    GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX (see Sources below).
    GliadinX does not prevent and is not a cure for celiac disease, however, extensive scientific research has been conducted at multiple medical centers which has shown that it effectively breaks down gliadin into small, harmless fragments before it can reach the small intestine. GliadinX is perfect for celiacs who still want to eat outside of their home, and not have to worry about cross-contamination, and for those who are gluten sensitive and wish to continue eating gluten.
    For more info visit their site.
    Sources:
    Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase

    Celiac.com Sponsor: Review
    GliadinX AN-PEP Enzymes Break Down Gluten in the Gut - A Product Review
    GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX (see Sources below).
    GliadinX does not prevent and is not a cure for celiac disease, however, extensive scientific research has been conducted at multiple medical centers which has shown that it effectively breaks down gliadin into small, harmless fragments before it can reach the small intestine. GliadinX is perfect for celiacs who still want to eat outside of their home, and not have to worry about cross-contamination, and for those who are gluten sensitive and wish to continue eating gluten.
    The quote below was made by Dr. Stefano Guandalini, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center-Comer Children’s Hospital, Chicago, IL, and was published in Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755:
    "12. Treatment of the Extra-Intestinal Manifestations of CD
    the only one that is currently on the market is the gluten-specific enzyme, GliadinX (AN-PEP). Unfortunately, it is only capable of detoxifying 0.2 g of gluten or roughly that of 1/8 of a slice of gluten-containing bread. For this reason, it should only be used as an adjunct to the GFD when there are concerns for accidental gluten contamination and in an effort to ameliorate symptoms, not as a replacement for the GFD."
    Many people have asked Celiac.com how they can order this product, so we've included a "Buy Now" link below to order them directly from the manufacturer:

     
    Sources: Scientific publications on AN-PEP enzymes:
    Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase

    Celiac.com Sponsor: Review
    How GliadinX Saved My Mom on Thanksgiving
    Celiac.com 12/09/2017 - For those of you who haven't yet heard about GliadinX, it is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), and, unlike other enzymes, these have been shown in studies to break down gluten in the stomach.
    I've been using them regularly for months, and I tend to take them whenever I eat out, or eat at a friend's house, so basically whenever I don't have control over my food's preparation. Since I began doing this I haven't had any incidents of upset stomach, which are my typical symptoms if I get any cross contamination. However, it is hard to prove a negative...after all, perhaps I haven't had any issues because all of the food I ate was 100% gluten-free...right?
    I will now describe a recent glutening incident that involved none other than my Mother, who visited us this past Thanksgiving. How this could happen in my home, after all I'm the owner of Celiac.com, is an embarrassing but true story which I will share here in the hope that it will help you avoid my errors, and perhaps give you a way to recover should something similar ever happen.
    My brother brought over three pies for Thanksgiving dessert, one was a gluten-free apple pie, and the other two were pumpkin pies: one was gluten-free, but the other was not. What could go wrong, right? My brother's reasoning for bringing a non gluten-free pie into my house was pretty basic: several of the guests were not on a gluten-free diet, so he wanted to offer them what they were used to.
    What you need to know about my Mother is that she's very gluten sensitive. A tiny amount of gluten leaves her wrecked for days. I think you probably know where I'm going here, but basically everyone was busy socializing, eating, or cleaning while dessert was being served, and a friend grabbed a piece of the gluten-containing pumpkin pie (she assumed that if it was in MY house it was gluten-free) and handed it to my Mother. After she swallowed two bites we realized the mistake, but it was too late. My Mother had the look of horror on her face as she realized that the rest of her trip to California was probably ruined.
    I immediately flew into action and gave her several capsules of GliadinX, which she took with lots of water. We carried on with the evening, and I checked in with her over the next couple of hours. Amazingly she didn't have any noticeable symptoms or issues, but she was still certain that they were coming, and that she wouldn't get any sleep and would feel horrible the next day. Remarkably, none of her worries came true. She slept fine, and woke up feeling great. We were both amazed because any past similar incidents always ended badly for her.
    Suffice it to say that my Mother now keeps a bottle of GliadinX with her all the time...just in case!
    --by Scott Adams
    Many people have asked Celiac.com how they can order this product, so we've included a "Buy Now" link below to order them directly from the manufacturer:

     
     
    Sources: Scientific publications on AN-PEP enzymes:
    Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase

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