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    Genetic Test for Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance. MTHFR.com's Celiac and Gluten Intolerance Report


    Genetic Test for Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance. MTHFR.com's Celiac and Gluten Intolerance Report

    Celiac.com 09/28/2018 - You have suffered from gluten intolerance most of your life, and you wonder how you can find out if you have celiac disease without undergoing an invasive and expensive medical procedure. You also wonder if you don’t have celiac disease, what the likelihood is of developing it during your lifetime?

    Your genes can tell a great deal. Interpretation of genetic information is an extremely accurate process. A negative result nearly excludes the possibility of your ever developing celiac disease. A positive test is about 97 percent accurate. This information is available in MTHFR.com’s Celiac and Gluten Intolerance Report.

    Have you wondered if you have some level of gluten intolerance or what your chances are of developing celiac disease? 
    MTHFR.com is one of the few companies, if not the only company, in the market that provides your results with a table that explains to you how likely you are to have celiac disease, not just whether you are positive or negative. Your genetic report will display your HLA-DQ results, which will clearly show you if you have a mutation and what type of mutation you have. The report will also display your likelihood of developing celiac disease as low, high, or very high based on your unique combination of mutations of the HLA-DQ genes. 

    The more likely you are to develop celiac disease, the more likely you are to develop gluten intolerance. The higher you are on the interpretation table, the more strictly you should avoid gluten.

    According to research, a positive result will give you a likelihood of developing celiac disease with an accuracy of 97%, while the negative result's accuracy are over 99%.

    Visit our site for more info.

     

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    By Vijay Kumar, PhD., IMMCO Diagnostics, Inc. - IMMTEST@AOL.COM
    The genetic markers associated with celiac disease are:
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/18/2013 - Up-regulation of T-bet and phosphorylated signal transducers and activators of transcription (pSTAT)1 are key transcription factors for the development of T helper type 1 (Th1) cells, and have been found in the mucosa of patients with untreated celiac disease.
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    The research team included G. Frisullo, V. Nociti, R. Iorio, A.K. Patanella, D. Plantone, A. Bianco, A. Marti, G. Cammarota, P.A. Tonali, A.P. Batocchi. They are affiliated with the Department of Neurosciences at Catholic University in Rome, Italy.
    For their study, the team used transcription factor analysis to determine whether T-bet and pSTAT1 expressions are up-regulated in the peripheral blood of celiac disease patients, and if they correlate with disease activity.
    They used flow cytometry to analyse T-bet, pSTAT1 and pSTAT3 expression in CD4(+), CD8(+) T cells, CD19(+) B cells and monocytes from peripheral blood of 15 untreated and 15 treated celiac disease patients and 30 controls. They also conducted a longitudinal study of five celiac patients before and after treatment with a gluten-free diet.
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    They found that T-bet expression in CD4(+), CD8(+) T cells, CD19(+) B cells and monocytes and IFN-gamma production by PBMC was higher in untreated than in treated celiac disease patients and control subjects.
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    Source:
     Clin Exp Immunol. 2009 Oct;158(1):106-14. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2249.2009.03999.x.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/24/2013 - Researchers don't know much about the genetic history of celiac disease. They know especially little about the age of specific gene sequences that leave people at risk for developing celiac disease.
    A recent case study provides a small bit of information about that question. The information was gathered by a team of researchers looking into the case of a young, first century AD woman, found in the archaeological site of Cosa. The woman's skeleton showed clinical signs of malnutrition, such as short height, osteoporosis, dental enamel hypoplasia and cribra orbitalia, indirect sign of anemia, all strongly suggestive for celiac disease.
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    World J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct 7;18(37):5300-4. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v18.i37.5300.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/03/2013 - Researchers have completed a genetic study of six autoimmune diseases, including diabetes, the largest such study of human disease genetics to date. The study will help scientists in their efforts to uncover the causes of these diseases, which include autoimmune thyroid disease, celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes.
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    Source:
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