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    Genetic Test for Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance. MTHFR.com's Celiac and Gluten Intolerance Report


    Genetic Test for Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance. MTHFR.com's Celiac and Gluten Intolerance Report

    Celiac.com 08/01/2018 - You have suffered from gluten intolerance most of your life, and you wonder how you can find out if you have celiac disease without undergoing an invasive and expensive medical procedure. You also wonder if you don’t have celiac disease, what the likelihood is of developing it during your lifetime?


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    Your genes can tell a great deal. Interpretation of genetic information is an extremely accurate process. A negative result nearly excludes the possibility of your ever developing celiac disease. A positive test is about 97 percent accurate. This information is available in MTHFR.com’s Celiac and Gluten Intolerance Report.

    Have you wondered if you have some level of gluten intolerance or what your chances are of developing celiac disease? 
    MTHFR.com is one of the few companies, if not the only company, in the market that provides your results with a table that explains to you how likely you are to have celiac disease, not just whether you are positive or negative. Your genetic report will display your HLA-DQ results, which will clearly show you if you have a mutation and what type of mutation you have. The report will also display your likelihood of developing celiac disease as low, high, or very high based on your unique combination of mutations of the HLA-DQ genes. 

    The more likely you are to develop celiac disease, the more likely you are to develop gluten intolerance. The higher you are on the interpretation table, the more strictly you should avoid gluten.

    According to research, a positive result will give you a likelihood of developing celiac disease with an accuracy of 97%, while the negative result's accuracy are over 99%.

    Visit our site for more info.

     

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    By Vijay Kumar, PhD., IMMCO Diagnostics, Inc. - IMMTEST@AOL.COM
    The genetic markers associated with celiac disease are:
    HLA DQalpha *0501 HLA DQbeta *0201 More than 90% of patients with celiac disease have these markers. Negative tests for these markers in conjunction with negative serum antibody tests suggest an absence of celiac disease. However, positive tests for the genetic markers do not necessarily mean that the patient has celiac disease. In conclusion, genetic markers can be used as a test to exclude celiac disease as a diagnosis.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/18/2013 - Up-regulation of T-bet and phosphorylated signal transducers and activators of transcription (pSTAT)1 are key transcription factors for the development of T helper type 1 (Th1) cells, and have been found in the mucosa of patients with untreated celiac disease.
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine if T-bet and pSTAT-1 expression in PBMC from celiac disease patients might offer new genetic markers of disease activity.
    The research team included G. Frisullo, V. Nociti, R. Iorio, A.K. Patanella, D. Plantone, A. Bianco, A. Marti, G. Cammarota, P.A. Tonali, A.P. Batocchi. They are affiliated with the Department of Neurosciences at Catholic University in Rome, Italy.
    For their study, the team used transcription factor analysis to determine whether T-bet and pSTAT1 expressions are up-regulated in the peripheral blood of celiac disease patients, and if they correlate with disease activity.
    They used flow cytometry to analyse T-bet, pSTAT1 and pSTAT3 expression in CD4(+), CD8(+) T cells, CD19(+) B cells and monocytes from peripheral blood of 15 untreated and 15 treated celiac disease patients and 30 controls. They also conducted a longitudinal study of five celiac patients before and after treatment with a gluten-free diet.
    For their evaluation, the team used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), interferon (FN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-10 production by peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures.
    They found that T-bet expression in CD4(+), CD8(+) T cells, CD19(+) B cells and monocytes and IFN-gamma production by PBMC was higher in untreated than in treated celiac disease patients and control subjects.
    They also found that pSTAT1 expression was higher in CD4(+)T cells, B cells and monocytes from untreated celiac disease patients than from treated patients and control subjects.
    Compared with treated celiac disease patients and control subjects, untreated patients showed increased pSTAT3 only in monocytes.
    They confirmed their results using data obtained from the longitudinal evaluation of transcription factors.
    From their results, they conclude that flow cytometric analysis of pSTAT1 and T-bet protein expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells could be useful and sensible markers in the follow-up of celiac disease patients to evaluate disease activity and response to dietary treatment.
    Source:
     Clin Exp Immunol. 2009 Oct;158(1):106-14. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2249.2009.03999.x.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/24/2013 - Researchers don't know much about the genetic history of celiac disease. They know especially little about the age of specific gene sequences that leave people at risk for developing celiac disease.
    A recent case study provides a small bit of information about that question. The information was gathered by a team of researchers looking into the case of a young, first century AD woman, found in the archaeological site of Cosa. The woman's skeleton showed clinical signs of malnutrition, such as short height, osteoporosis, dental enamel hypoplasia and cribra orbitalia, indirect sign of anemia, all strongly suggestive for celiac disease.
    The research team included G. Gasbarrini, O. Rickards, C. Martínez-Labarga, E. Pacciani, F. Chilleri, L. Laterza, G. Marangi, F. Scaldaferri, and A. Gasbarrini. They are affiliated with the Ricerca in Medicina Foundation NGO, Falcone and Borsellino Gallery, in Bologna, Italy.
    However, initial inspection of the woman's bones did not provide answers about the genetics that might confirm that these traits were, in fact, associated directly with celiac disease.
    To do that, the team needed to examine her human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II polymorphism. That required extracting DNA from a bone sample and a tooth and genotyping HLA using three HLA-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms for DQ8, DQ2.2 and DQ2.5, specifically associated to celiac disease.
    The results showed that the woman did in fact carry HLA DQ 2.5, the haplotype associated to the highest risk of celiac disease. This is the first time that researcher have documented the presence of a celiac-associated HLA haplotype in an archaeological specimen.
    The results show that the genetic markers associated with high risk of celiac disease are at least a couple of thousand years old.
    Source:
    World J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct 7;18(37):5300-4. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v18.i37.5300.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/03/2013 - Researchers have completed a genetic study of six autoimmune diseases, including diabetes, the largest such study of human disease genetics to date. The study will help scientists in their efforts to uncover the causes of these diseases, which include autoimmune thyroid disease, celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes.
    While currently unknown, the underlying causes of these conditions are believed to involve a complex combination of genetic and environmental factors. In each of the six diseases, the identified genetic variants explained only a proportion of the heritability.
    Under one of the current major genetic disease hypotheses, the so called ‘rare-variant synthetic genome-wide association hypothesis,’ a small number of rare variants in risk genes are likely the major cause of the heritability of these conditions.
    In their study, the research team used high-throughput sequencing techniques, in an effort to identify new genetic variants, including rare and potentially high risk variants, in 25 previously identified risk genes taken from a sample of nearly 42,000 patients.
    Their data suggest that the genetic risk of these diseases more likely results from a complex interaction of hundreds of variants, each small on its own, but which, taken together impact the development of these six diseases.
    They estimate that rare variants in these risk genes make up only about three per cent of the heritability of these conditions that can be explained by common variants.
    The results, says lead study author David van Heel, suggest that "risk for these autoimmune diseases is not due to a few high-risk genetic variations." Rather, risk is likely due to a "random selection from many common genetic variants which each have a weak effect.”
    This could mean that it will never be possible to accurately predict a person's risk of developing any of these six autoimmune diseases, simply because there are too many variables.
    “However, the results do provide important information about the biological basis of these conditions and the pathways involved, which could lead to the identification new drug targets,” said van Heel.
    Source:
    Nature Genetics 42, 295–302 (2010). doi:10.1038/ng.543; and Firstpost.com.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Can a Gluten-Free Diet Normalize Vitamin D Levels for Celiac Patients?
    Celiac.com 08/16/2018 - What is the significance of vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients? A pair of researchers recently set out to assess the value and significance of 25(OH) and 1,25(OH) vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients through a comprehensive review of medical literature.
    Researchers included F Zingone and C Ciacci are affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy; and the Celiac Center, AOU San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi di Aragona, University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Salerno, Italy. 
    Within the wide spectrum of symptoms and alteration of systems that characterizes celiac disease, several studies indicate a low-level of vitamin D, therefore recent guidelines suggest its evaluation at the time of diagnosis. This review examines the data from existing studies in which vitamin D has been assessed in celiac patients. 
    Our review indicates that most of the studies on vitamin D in adult celiac disease report a 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency at diagnosis that disappears when the patient goes on a gluten-free diet, independently of any supplementation. Instead, the researchers found that levels of calcitriol, the active 1,25 (OH) form of vitamin D, fell within the normal range at the time of celiac diagnosis. 
    Basically, their study strongly suggests that people with celiac disease can recover normal vitamin D levels through a gluten-free diet, without requiring any supplementation.
    Source:
    Dig Liver Dis. 2018 Aug;50(8):757-760. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2018.04.005. Epub 2018 Apr 13.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Could Gluten-Free Food Be Hurting Your Dog?
    Celiac.com 08/15/2018 - Grain-free food has been linked to heart disease in dogs. A canine cardiovascular disease that has historically been seen in just a few breeds is becoming more common in other breeds, and one possible culprit is grain-free dog food. 
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    Genetically, dogs are well adapted to easily digest grains and other carbohydrates. Also, beef and dairy remain the most common allergens for dogs, so even dogs with allergies are unlikely to need to need grain-free food. 
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    Stay tuned for more on the FDA’s investigation and any findings they make.
    Read more at Bizjournals.com
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Did You Miss the Gluten-Free Fireworks This Past Fourth of July?
    Celiac.com 08/14/2018 - Occasionally, Celiac.com learns of an amusing gluten-free story after the fact. Such is the case of the “Gluten-Free Fireworks.” 
    We recently learned about a funny little event that happened leading up to Fourth of July celebrations in the town of Springdale in Northwest Arkansas. It seems that a sign advertising "Gluten Free Fireworks" popped up near a fireworks stand on interstate 49 in Springdale. 
    In case you missed the recent dose of Fourth of July humor, in an effort to attract customers and provide a bit of holiday levity, Pinnacle Fireworks put up a sign advertising "gluten-free fireworks.” 
    The small company is owned by Adam Keeley and his father. "A lot of the people that come in want to crack a joke right along with you," Keeley said. "Every now and then, you will get someone that comes in and says so fireworks are supposed to be gluten-free right? Have I been buying fireworks that have gluten? So then I say no, no they are gluten-free. It's just a little fun."
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    We at Celiac.com hope you and your family had a safe, enjoyable, and, yes, gluten-free Fourth of July. Stay tuned for more on gluten-free fireworks and other zany, tongue-in-cheek stories.
    Read more at kark.com
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Stress-Related Disorders Associated with Higher Risk for Autoimmune Disease
    Celiac.com 08/13/2018 - It’s not uncommon for people to have psychiatric reactions to stressful life events, and these reactions may trigger some immune dysfunction. Researchers don’t yet know whether such reactions increase overall risk of autoimmune disease.
    Are psychiatric reactions induced by trauma or other life stressors associated with subsequent risk of autoimmune disease? Are stress-related disorders significantly associated with risk of subsequent autoimmune disease?
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    They are variously affiliated with the Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Centre for Rheumatology Research, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; the Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; the Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; the Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; the Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; and the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
    The team conducted a Swedish register-based retrospective cohort study that included 106, 464 patients with stress-related disorders, 1,064 ,640 matched unexposed individuals, and 126 ,652 full siblings to determine whether a clinical diagnosis of stress-related disorders was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease.
    The team identified stress-related disorder and autoimmune diseases using the National Patient Register. They used Cox model to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs of 41 autoimmune diseases beyond 1 year after the diagnosis of stress-related disorders, controlling for multiple risk factors.
    The data showed that being diagnosed with a stress-related disorder, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, acute stress reaction, adjustment disorder, and other stress reactions, was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease, compared with matched unexposed individuals. The team is calling for further studies to better understand the associations and the underlying factors.
    Source:
    JAMA. 2018;319(23):2388-2400. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.7028  

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-Free Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Breasts
    Celiac.com 08/11/2018 - Need a quick, easy, reliable gluten-free dish that will satisfy everyone and leave the cook with plenty of time to relax? This recipe is sure to do the trick. Best of all, it's super easy. Just grab some chicken breasts, season them, hit them with a sprig of rosemary, wrap some bacon around them, and chuck them on the grill and call it dinner. Okay, you can add some rice and veggies.
    Ingredients:
    4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves 4 thick slices bacon 4 teaspoons garlic powder 4 small sprigs fresh rosemary salt and pepper to taste Directions:
    Heat an outdoor grill to medium-high heat, and lightly oil the grate.
    Sprinkle 1 teaspoon garlic powder on a chicken breast and season with salt and pepper. 
    Place a rosemary sprig on each chicken breast. 
    Wrap the bacon around the chicken and the rosemary. 
    Hold bacon in place with a toothpick or extra rosemary stem.
    Cook the chicken breasts until no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, about 8 minutes per side. 
    Keep an eye out for any grill flare ups from the bacon grease. 
    Remove the toothpicks and serve with steamed rice and your favorite vegetables for a winning meal.