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  • Lipsense by Senegence for Gluten-Free Lipstick & Lip Gloss

      SeneGence uses only the highest quality ingredients and all their products are made entirely in the USA.

    Caption: Image: SeneGence

    Celiac.com 05/01/2019 - Imagine my surprise when I discovered I was being glutened by my lipstick and makeup!?! After much research on why I was still suffering from gluten symptoms, I found that they both did! That search led me to Lipsense, by Senegence – this long lasting, moisturizing lipstick lasts up to 18 hours without smudging off! It's like MAGIC! LipSense is gluten-free, vegan, organic, wax free, lead free, cruelty free and non-GMO.

    SeneGence uses only the highest quality ingredients and all their products (Lipsense, full makeup line, full skin care line, spa line, and hair care line – all anti-aging!) are made entirely in the USA. LipSense is NOT a stain; it is not drying. After applying the lipcolor, you apply a Lipsense gloss to seal it in and moisturize your lips with Vitamin E and Shea Butter. Your lips will become more plump and you will begin to notice fewer lines in your lips!!!! Your lips will be in their best condition ever!

    There are over 70 colors to choose from, and over 20 glosses; which can also be worn by themselves. Beware....you may just get addicted to LipSense! There is a reason why the Rockettes and the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders wear our Blu Red and Fly Girl colors, and why we're the official lipstick of Broadway - it's that good! And just wait until you try our Volumizing Mascara with growth serum, our tinted moisturizer, our smudge proof eyeliner, or our tightening and firming cream… it's all so amazing and all gluten free!

    Click here to see all of our Lipsense colors and skin care products.
     


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  • Related Articles

    Kristen Campbell
    Celiac.com 10/02/2008 - Anyone with confirmed gluten sensitivity knows what a web of conflicting research and medical opinions he or she must wade through in order to get diagnosed. Sadly, it is a rare thing for a patient to have to consult less than a handful of doctors, and consider many various ailments before hearing the life-altering statement: You have celiac disease.
    So then it should be of no surprise that once the diagnosis has been made, there is still much debate over what this means to an individual. A celiac disease diagnosis means the lifetime avoidance of anything that contains gluten contained in wheat, barley and rye and their derivatives—and even this simple statement is not always agreed upon by experts.
    The consensus is that people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance must avoid the proteins found in wheat, barley and rye for the rest of their lives. But still, there is the occasional "expert" who seems to think that this “problem” could go away—that it can be “cured.” Of course, this idea seems completely off base to most, but to the patient of a doctor who has guided that individual into the gluten-free light, it just may seem to make sense.
    And reading even further into the only scientifically accepted treatment—a lifetime avoidance of gluten from wheat, barley and rye—more questions can be raised, for example: Should individuals who are gluten sensitive also avoid topical skin care and cosmetic products that contain gluten?
    Much of the research available seems to agree that lipsticks and toothpastes ought to be gluten free, but that a topically applied product need not be. Although this is a widely-accepted opinion, it falls to pieces the moment one considers the basis behind the entire green beauty industry’s monumental success: What goes on the skin, goes into the body.
    According to The Good Housekeeping Institute up to 60% of a product applied to the skin can be absorbed into the bloodstream. So why then would any individual with gluten sensitivity be so firm in his or her resolve to avoid dietary gluten, yet allow it to seep into the body via topical application? To some the answer may be simple—because his or her doctor said so. The very same doctor who changed that person’s life, forever improving his patient’s health, may not necessarily agree that gluten, or harmful fractions of gluten like gliadin, could pass into the patient's body and cause harm.
    A fortunate few, however, see a doctor who is more forward-thinking in his or her treatment methods—doctors who may be more aware of the latest research on gluten sensitivity. One example of such a doctor is Dr. Kenneth Fine, M.D. of EnteroLab.com, who understands that: "Gluten sensitivity is a systemic immune reaction to gluten anywhere in the body, not just that entering the body via the gut. Therefore, topically applied lotions, creams, shampoos, etc. containing gluten would indeed provide a source of gluten to the body, and we therefore recommend all such products be discontinued for optimal health."
    So to those individuals whose doctors still insist that it is unnecessary to adhere to a gluten-free beauty routine, perhaps an inquiry into that doctor’s thoughts on the general absorption of topical products may shine a light on the basis behind their opinions. Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are becoming better understood, and some experts believe that up to 15% of Americans may be affected by some form of gluten sensitivity. And just as all who are gluten-sensitive continue to pour through the latest articles in an effort to live the healthiest gluten-free lifestyle that they can, so too are our doctors who are doing their very best to keep up with the latest scientific findings concerning gluten sensitivity. The more studies and research that are done on this topic, the better it will be for everyone—but unless a doctor is a specialist in this field, the necessary information concerning the broad range of problems that gluten can cause in a sensitive individual may not reach him in time.
    Perhaps acceptance of the idea that topical gluten can also wreak havoc internally is just the next step in the world-wide education of the ill effects that gluten can have on some people. But for now, the choice of whether or not to avoid topically applied cosmetics and skin care products that contain gluten is, for those affected, a matter of whose opinion they’re going to trust: Specialists in the field of gluten sensitivity, or doctors who may not be up on the latest information on the effects of gluten sensitivity.


    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten in Cosmetics: A Threat to People with Celiac Disease?
    Celiac.com 12/09/2011 - Gluten in lip, facial or other body products may be a threat to people with celiac disease, according to a new study.
    A research team from George Washington University evaluated products from the top ten American cosmetics companies. They found a troubling lack of information about product ingredients. Only two of the ten companies featured clear, detailed ingredients, and none of the companies offered products that were gluten-free.
    The study findings were revealed at the annual scientific meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology in Washington, D.C.
    The results are worrisome, because cosmetics that contain gluten can "result in an exacerbation of celiac disease," said researcher Dr. Pia Prakash. "This study revealed that information about the ingredients, including the potential gluten content, in cosmetics is not readily available."
    A number of smaller cosmetic companies produce gluten-free alternatives, said Prakash, who added that larger companies should take steps to inform consumers
    with gluten sensitivity whether their products are safe for those individuals.
    The study came about partly because doctors had seen a 28-year-old woman with celiac disease who suffered a worsening of symptoms, including gastrointestinal complications and a skin rash, after she used a "natural" body lotion.
    The doctors and the woman had a hard time trying to figure out if the lotion contained gluten. However, Prakash said, "…once she stopped using the body lotion her symptoms resolved."
    Such cases highlight the huge challenge faced by people with celiac disease in trying to determine if their cosmetic products contain gluten.
    Because the results of the study were presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be considered preliminary until peer-reviewed and published in a medical journal.
    Source:

    http://www.newsday.com/news/health/gluten-in-cosmetics-threaten-those-with-celiac-disease-1.3288992

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/12/2015 - The current treatment for celiac disease is the avoidance of gluten-containing foods, beverages, and other products by means of a strict gluten-free diet.
    Following such a diet can be challenging, but recent FDA labeling rules go a long way toward helping people with celiac disease know with pretty good certainty whether a food product contains gluten, or is gluten-free.
    However, When it comes to prescription drugs, medicines, OTC products, supplements, and vitamins, people with celiac disease currently have little guidance. The FDA rules that mandate the labeling of gluten and other known allergens on food product labels does not apply beyond food. There are currently no rules mandating the labeling of gluten in drugs and medicines. That means that your average person with celiac disease might have a hard time finding out which medications, OTC products, supplements, and vitamins may contain gluten, and may experience adverse symptoms from continued gluten ingestion.
    A team of researchers set out to assess the role of pharmacists in educating patients and evaluating their medication use to ensure the optimal management of celiac disease. The research team included Ashley N. Johnson, PharmD, BCPS, Angela N. Skaff, BS, PharmD Candidate, and Lauren Senesac, PharmD. They are affiliated with the Pharmacy Practice Drug Information Center, and the Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy Palm Beach Atlantic University West Palm Beach, Florida.
    The team celiac disease review included Etiology and Risk Factors, Clinical Presentation and Diagnosis, Factors That May Impair Drug Absorption, Legislation, Management, and Resources. They found that pharmacists do indeed have an essential role to play in educating patients and evaluating their medication use to ensure the optimal management of celiac disease. This often can be accomplished by evaluating the ingredient list, contacting the manufacturer, or utilizing a variety of other resources.
    Gluten can potentially be introduced and contaminate otherwise gluten-free products during the manufacturing process, although the likelihood is low. Key points to consider are that even if a brand product is confirmed to be gluten-free, it cannot be assumed that the generic version is also gluten-free, and that if a product has a new formulation, appearance, or manufacturer, it is prudent to reassess it and confirm that it remains gluten-free.
    When evaluating the gluten content of prescription and OTC products, it should be remembered that gluten can be masked in an excipient.
    Starches used as excipients in pharmaceutical products are often derived from rice, potato, or tapioca, which are gluten-free. However, if the source of the starch is not explicitly stated, the excipients may contain gluten. Sources of excipients that contain gluten include barley, farina, kamut, rye, spelt, triticale, and wheat.
    Pharmacists play a pivotal role in educating patients about gluten-containing foods, medications, and supplements in order to help them adhere to a GFD and in ensuring that patients receive additional follow-up care, if needed.
    Source:
    US Pharmacist. 2014;39(12):44-48.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/19/2015 - People who must avoid gluten for medical reasons just got a reason to be hopeful that gluten in medicines, which are not regulated under the current FDA law, might soon be labeled by law.
    U.S. Representatives Tim Ryan (D-OH) and Nita Lowey (D-NY) recently introduced a bill to make it easier for people with gluten-related disorders to identify medications that contain gluten.
    Their bill, the Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act of 2015 would change the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act so that the label of any medicine intended for human use must divulge any ingredient, besides sugar alcohol, that is derived from a grain or contains gluten. The bill is intended to help people with Celiac disease avoid gluten.
    "Americans deserve to know what is in their food and drugs," agreed Lowey. "Providing uniform standards for food and drug labeling will make a world of difference to the quality of life for people with celiac disease.
    People want medicine labels to provide "the information they need to protect their health and wellbeing," Ryan added.
    Keep an eye on congress to see how this proceeds, and check back with celiac.com to follow progress on this important issue.
    Source:
    CBS News

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