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    Meet Thrive Market, Your New Destination for Celiac-Friendly Groceries


    Celiac.com Sponsor: Banner
    • Shop celiac-friendly ingredients with Thrive Market!

    Meet Thrive Market, Your New Destination for Celiac-Friendly Groceries
    Image Caption: Image: Thrive Market

    Celiac.com 09/01/2018 - Finding the best celiac-friendly products can be a challenge, but the hunt is about to get a whole lot easier thanks to a healthy food company that’s changing the way we shop for groceries. 

    Thrive Market’s mission is simple: make healthy living and organic food accessible to everyone—regardless of where they live or how much they make. How do they do it? By offering organic, wholesome foods (including celiac and gluten-free options) and nontoxic home and body care products for less than what you’ll find in traditional retail stores—all delivered straight to your door. Here are just a few of the perks you can enjoy when you join:

    • Everyday low prices: Shop trusted celiac-friendly brands like Simple Mills, Enjoy Life, Purely Elizabeth, The New Primal, Lundberg Farms, Country Life, Amy’s, Banza, Sir Kensington’s, and many more, at 25-50% off! 
    • Find exactly what you need: Thrive Market has done the work for you! It carries the top allergen-friendly and specialty brands, and the site and free app make it simple to find exactly what you need. Easily filter categories and dietary needs, like “gluten-free,” “certified gluten-free,” and “certified organic.”  
    • Shipped to your door: Skip lines at the grocery store, shop in the comfort of your home, and get everything delivered to your door.
    • Eco-friendly packaging: All boxes and inserts are made from recycled paper and are recyclable. Thrive Market is 100% carbon-neutral and certified through carbonfund.org. Our certification covers national shipping, packaging materials, warehouse utilities, even the commutes of our team.
    • Shop with a cause: Thrive Market believes by working together, it can make healthy food accessible for all. That’s why it started Thrive Gives, a program that provides grocery stipends, educational content, and free memberships to teachers, veterans, and low-income families. Its efforts are made possible by a dedicated team, partners, and committed Thrive Market members. For every paid Thrive Market member, we donate a free membership to a family in need!  

    So, what are you waiting for? Get an extra 25% off your first purchase and a FREE 30 day trial. Simply click here!

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    Maria Lerario
    Gluten-Free Grocery Store Bread Reviewed
    Celiac.com 11/17/2015 - For most people, when they think of gluten, the first thing that comes to mind is bread. And for most people with celiac or a gluten sensitivity, that is what we miss most.
    While people with celiac or gluten sensitivity may never be able to experience the wide selection or soft texture that "glutenous" bread offers, there are still some tasty gluten-free bread options available at most grocery stores. In order to find the best gluten-free bread options, I went to my local Giant Eagle and tried all of the gluten-free bread available and explored four main aspects: taste, texture, price, and variety.
    The three brands of gluten-free bread offered at Giant Eagle were Schar, Udi's, and Goodbye Gluten.
    In the variety category, Udi's offered the largest selection of bread with the choice of white bread, multigrain bread, cinnamon raisin bread, and millet-chia bread and omega flax and fiber bread. Udi's also offers a large variety of other products ranging from muffins and cookies, to pizza crusts and tortillas.
    While Udi's may have the largest variety of the three brands, Schar offered a few different kinds of bread as well, with a cinnamon raisin and multigrain option along with an assortment of rolls.
    In the category of price, Goodbye Gluten came in as the most inexpensive per ounce at $0.27 per ounce. Udi's was in the middle $0.37 per oz. and Schar was the most expensive of the three, coming in at $0.40 per oz.
    Now let's get down to business. Taste and texture—the two aspects that are hardest to get right when making gluten-free bread. In my opinion, Udi's won both categories with the tastiness, most normal textured bread. My only critique was the slices of bread weren't big enough! All three brands seemed to have their slices of bread on the smaller side, but Udi's bread seemed to be especially small.
    Although Udi's took the first prize in three of the four categories, that is not to say the other two brands were not good. I was impressed with all three brands, but my main critique covers the texture category.
    The Goodbye Gluten bread seemed to be very dense, and while most gluten-free bread crumbles more than normal, I felt that the Goodbye Gluten loaf broke easier than the other two. However, it was very moist, something that is hard to come by in gluten-free bread.
    With the Schar bread, I felt that it was a little dry and grainy rather than moist and chewy like normal gluten filled bread. However, I found that when I toasted the bread, it had a texture more consistent with normal toast.
    Overall, I was satisfied with all three brands, but Udi's was the favorite. With the texture and taste being spot on, I did not need much else to convince me, but the added bonus of the reasonable price and large variety made it the most desirable gluten-free bread available.

    Jefferson Adams
    Has Barilla Pasta Been Ripping Off Customers?
    Celiac.com 10/06/2016 - If you've bought pasta in a box, or if you've even strolled your boxed pasta aisle at the supermarket, you've likely come across Barilla, and their famous blue box. Well, it turns out that the world's largest pasta-maker might have been ripping off customers by routinely under filling their boxes. In fact, Barilla is being sued for 'substantially' under-filling boxes and, as a result, cheating customers out of as much as a quarter of their noodles.
    Plaintiffs Alessandro Berni, Domenico Salvata, Mossimo Simioli, and Giuseppe Santochirico, have filed a class-action lawsuit alleging that Barilla deceptively packages certain pastas in order to deceive consumers. They claim extra-protein, whole-grain, and gluten-free pastas are placed in the standard-size boxes used for plain old penne or farfalle — only these specialty boxes are "substantially under-filled."
    According to the plaintiffs' math, a box of Protein Plus contains 9.4 percent less pasta, the whole-grain variety is under-filled by 17.4 percent, and the gluten-free shorts buyers a full 25 percent. At the heart of the dispute is a practice commonly known as "slack-fill," the practice of leaving empty space at the top of packaged goods.
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    The plaintiffs admit that the boxes do include a vague reference to a "new reduced net weight," but it was placed so that most customers would never notice it. Customers were otherwise uninformed that any change has been made to the amount of pasts in the box.
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    Read more at: Grubstreet.com

    Celiac.com Sponsor: Review
    GliadinX AN-PEP Enzymes Break Down Gluten in the Gut - A Product Review
    GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX (see Sources below).
    GliadinX does not prevent and is not a cure for celiac disease, however, extensive scientific research has been conducted at multiple medical centers which has shown that it effectively breaks down gliadin into small, harmless fragments before it can reach the small intestine. GliadinX is perfect for celiacs who still want to eat outside of their home, and not have to worry about cross-contamination, and for those who are gluten sensitive and wish to continue eating gluten.
    The quote below was made by Dr. Stefano Guandalini, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center-Comer Children’s Hospital, Chicago, IL, and was published in Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755:
    "12. Treatment of the Extra-Intestinal Manifestations of CD
    the only one that is currently on the market is the gluten-specific enzyme, GliadinX (AN-PEP). Unfortunately, it is only capable of detoxifying 0.2 g of gluten or roughly that of 1/8 of a slice of gluten-containing bread. For this reason, it should only be used as an adjunct to the GFD when there are concerns for accidental gluten contamination and in an effort to ameliorate symptoms, not as a replacement for the GFD."
    Many people have asked Celiac.com how they can order this product, so we've included a "Buy Now" link below to order them directly from the manufacturer:

     
    Sources: Scientific publications on AN-PEP enzymes:
    Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-Free Food Now Mainstream
    Celiac.com 09/06/2017 - Gluten-free food is now so mainstream that its lack of gluten is no longer a highlight, but is now just another of the many ways manufacturers signal a healthy product.
    Gluten-free has gone from specialty niche to mainstream, says David Sprinkle, research director of the market research firm Packaged Facts.
    "Where once upon a time a package might have had a singular fat-free or no-sugar-added label, it is now common to see packages that carry a host of tags such as certified organic, non-GMO, gluten-free, no antibiotics ever, no artificial preservatives, cage-free and more," says Sprinkle. Gluten-free tag is now just one of many "free-from" tags that help to lure consumers.
    That sentiment is shared by Kara Nielsen, sales and engagement manager at U.S.A., for Dutch company Innova Market Insights. Nielson says that Innova's data from "both global product launches and consumer surveys show that gluten-free is not going away, but rather found a place in the mainstream."
    So a market once dedicated to people with medical issues has now become a market for consumers who see avoiding gluten as a lifestyle choice.
    As that has happened, gluten-free has become part of that mix instead of being a focal point. This has in turn driven an evolution towards more healthy ingredients, and healthier overall profiles for many gluten-free foods.
    "The gluten-free trend is evolving in bakery products to feature more high-fiber and high-protein ancient grains and seeds, including buckwheat, teff and chia seeds, as well as gluten-free oats," Ms. Nielsen said.
    For consumers who have celiac disease or gluten intolerance, this can require more diligence in their shopping. They can't necessarily trust a gluten-free label without proper scrutiny. There are more than a few tricky labels out there. Some products that appear to be gluten-free may not meet FDA standards.
    The upside is a flood of new gluten-free products that are not only safe for people with celiac disease, but markedly healthier than gluten-free products of the past.
    Source:
    foodbusinessnews.net

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