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    New Food For Life Sprouted Breads: Superior Nutrition is Now...Gluten Free!


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    After countless hours of R&D, Food For Life is pleased to release the first available gluten-free breads, which are made from sprouted grains such as quinoa, millet and chia.


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    It has become clear that many of the gluten free breads on the market today, while being "gluten-free", are simply not addressing the overall health needs of consumers.   You see, gluten free breads lack the main all love in bread.  They lack the one component that gives bread that familiar soft chewy texture.  And, that component is gluten.  

    Without Gluten, manufacturers are forced to use alternative ingredients that mimic the elasticity that gluten provides.  And, many of them are choosing to feature egg, milk and refined starches today.    However, in their quest to achieve even greater elasticity in an effort to win out on the soft and chewy test, consumers are seeing an ever expanding list of gluten free breads made from ingredients which you wouldn't expect in "natural" breads, some of which are sadly devoid of many nutrients.  Yes, the race to replace gluten is getting to the point where it really needed to be addressed for the benefit of the gluten intolerant consumer.

    And, that is really the inspiration behind Food For Life's Sprouted For Life™ Gluten-Free Breads.  Finally, a completely gluten free bread line in (4) varieties specifically created with your health in mind.  Not only are they gluten free, but they are also vegan, and are made from incredibly nutritious ingredients like, sprouted quinoa, sprouted millet and hydrated chia seeds.

    Sprouted to maximize nutrition and digestibility.  Available soon in the frozen section.

    With just one bite, you'll know they're a food for life!

    For more info visit our site.

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    Advertising Product-Review
    I've now been gluten-free for over 20 years, yet I've never broken down and purchased a bread machine, nor have I ever used one. It should go without saying that I am also eating very mediocre gluten-free bread.
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    GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX (see Sources below).
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    Sources:
    Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase

    Advertising Product-Review
    GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX (see Sources below).
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    Sources: Scientific publications on AN-PEP enzymes:
    Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase

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    Celiac.com 12/09/2017 - For those of you who haven't yet heard about GliadinX, it is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), and, unlike other enzymes, these have been shown in studies to break down gluten in the stomach.
    I've been using them regularly for months, and I tend to take them whenever I eat out, or eat at a friend's house, so basically whenever I don't have control over my food's preparation. Since I began doing this I haven't had any incidents of upset stomach, which are my typical symptoms if I get any cross contamination. However, it is hard to prove a negative...after all, perhaps I haven't had any issues because all of the food I ate was 100% gluten-free...right?
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    Sources: Scientific publications on AN-PEP enzymes:
    Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase

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    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.