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    Nush Foods for Low Carb Gluten-Free Cakes


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    • Nush Foods makes gluten-free, low-carb, low-to-no-sugar snack cakes.


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    Celiac.com 08/01/2018 - Muffy Mead-Ferro knew her whole family would be healthier if they ate less sugar and fewer carbs. But as the primary grocery shopper, it was hard to find prepared foods that weren’t full of sugar and carbs. And let’s face it, we need prepared foods to live this nutty life we live. We’re on the run sometimes! Especially in the morning, right? So she started baking. Tasting. Re-searching. And baking some more. Eventually what came out of the oven was a new company: nush.  Oh, and by the way, it is gluten-free too. 


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    The more we read and the more we know about how our bodies work, the more committed we are to helping people get off the sugar-and-carb roller coaster. And it is a roller-coaster! Have you ever noticed when you have one chocolate chip cookie, all you want is 10 more? That’s partly because your blood sugar is spiked, and then crashes, and the quickest way to prop it up again is more sugar. Meanwhile, you’re growing a huge colony of sugar-loving microbes in your gut that are also demanding more sugar. We think it’s time to turn this train around!  

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  • Related Articles

    Danna Korn
    The key to gluten-free cooking is simple: take a little bit of homework on your part, a dash of extra effort, and dump in a whole lot of creativity - voila! You're a gluten-free gourmet! But some of the greatest culinary challenges are for those meals-on-the-run, which seem to be the most common kind sometimes. Kids with Celiac Disease has extensive menu suggestions for all meals and snacks, but the following is a short excerpt of on-the-go snack ideas:
    Chips There are many flavors of gluten-free chips available at grocery stores! string cheese Taquitos, quesadillas, tacos, tamales (made with corn tortillas - they travel well) Nachos Corn Nuts Raisins and other dried fruit Chex mix There is a gluten-free cereal available at many grocery stores or health food markets thats just like Chex--make the mix as you would Chex mix. Popcorn Cheese cubes with toothpicks in them and rice crackers Fruit rolls Lettuce wrapped around ham, cheese, turkey, or roast beef Rice cakes (check with the manufacturer; not all are gluten-free) Hard-boiled eggs or deviled eggs Applesauce Apples dipped in caramel or peanut butter (if youre sending apples in a lunchbox, remember to pour lemon juice over the slices; that will keep them from turning brown) Individually packaged pudding Jello Yogurt Fruit cups (individually packaged cups are great for lunchboxes) Fruit snacks (like Farleys brand) High-protein bars (e.g., Tigers Milk, GeniSoy) Nuts Marshmallows Trail mix Combine peanuts, M&Ms, dried fruit, chocolate chips, and other trail mix items for a great on-the-go snack.
    - Beware of commercial trail mixes--they often roll their date pieces in oat flour. The occasional candy bar or other junk food treat (see the next chapter for information on safe junk food)

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-free Back-to-School Tips and Recipes
    Celiac.com 08/30/2010 - If it hasn't started yet, school's just around the corner for millions of gluten-free kids. That means a gluten-free plan for breakfast every morning, and for gluten-free lunches, and in-school and after-school snacks.
    Dana Korn, author of Kids with Celiac Disease, makes some excellent suggestions for getting an early handle on any gluten-free challenges or resources that may await your child at school. Her suggestions include:

    Empower Your Child: Encourage even young children to understand their diet, the importance of following it, and to have the confidence to mention it to adults and other kids as needed. Provide Written Instructions: Provide the teachers, principal, school nurse, dietitian, or any food preparer, with clear, concise written materials explaining celiac disease and your child's diet. Include lists of safe foods and unsafe foods. Make sure everyone in the school food loop knows the importance of your child remaining gluten-free. Help to make them aware of any alternative snacks or food you may have packed, along with a list of safe and unsafe foods.
    Evaluate the School's Gluten-free Options
    Schools often prepare food for numerous children with lactose  or gluten-intolerance, peanut allergies, or other food restrictions.  Talk to the dietitian or person in charge of food preparation. Review menus, furnish lists, and talk about the importance of avoiding cross-contamination. If you feel comfortable with the personnel's ability to provide a gluten-free diet, give them the chance to do so. If you're not comfortable, or if it doesn't work out, you can always pack a lunch.
    The Gluten Free Lunch Book offers lunch suggestions for days when children can't eat cafeteria food. Online, the blog onlysometimesclever offers up some excellent gluten-free food recipes for school day meals.

    Talk to Lunchtime Supervisors
    So the best you can do is explain to your child why she cant trade food with her buddies, and make sure the lunch area monitors are keeping an eye out for swappers.
    Provide Teacher with Gluten-free Treats
    Get a schedule of classmates birthdays and scheduled holiday parties. Plan accordingly. If your child's birthday falls on a school day, consider celebrating with gluten-free treats for the whole class.For information on children's legal rights to reduced-cost school lunches, see section 504 of Kids with Celiac Disease.

    Gluten-free Lunch Tips
    Toast gluten-free bread before making sandwiches. Also, most gluten free bread travels better wrapped in a paper towel and placed in a reusable plastic container than it does in sandwich bags. Consider keeping bread separate from sandwich ingredients. Include spreads on the side.
    Last, find Gluten-Free School Lunch Recipes and information on How to Pack a Gluten-Free Lunch, along with gluten-free back-to-school resources, tips and food ideas at:

    onlysometimesclever.wordpress.com Kids With Celiac Disease The Kids are Back in School - Tips for Making the (Gluten-Free) Grade The Gluten Free Kid: a Celiac Survival Guide Gluten-Free School Lunch Recipes How to Pack a Gluten-Free Lunch

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/25/2012 - Perhaps due to a combination of public information efforts and higher diagnosis rates, but awareness of celiac disease, gluten-free and other food sensitivities is slowly spreading to schools across the nation. This reality, coupled with general student interest in a greater variety of healthier food options is driving a change in both vocabulary and offerings at campuses around the country.
    Go to many schools today, and you may hear terms like 'gluten-free,' 'celiac-friendly,' or 'allergen-free' thrown around liberally with more common standbys like 'kosher,' 'organic,' 'vegetarian,' and 'vegan.'
    Students are "becoming more sophisticated customers," says Joe Wojtowicz, general manager of Sodexo, Inc.'s Crossroads dining room at Concordia University Chicago in River Forest. These days, it's common for staff to field questions about food options before students even arrive on campus, especially questions about celiac disease, gluten-intolerance, food allergies and vegetarian preferences.
    For these students, access to accurate nutritional information is all the more important given their need to avoid foods that trigger allergies, Wojtowicz says. "All our menus are on the Web, and they click through an item to learn the nutritional content," he adds. "And we make sure we label our offerings if they contain nuts." These benefits extend to students with celiac disease and gluten intolerance, as well.
    Overall, more students are requesting foods that are more nutritious and healthful than in the past, says Travis Orman, senior director of dining services with Chartwells Educational Dining Services at Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, which serves up to 3,200 meals a day. Students are also demanding more options. That means a change in even the most basic offerings.
    For example, many colleges are finding that students enjoy ethnic specialities. Orman says authentic Mexican is a favorite on his campus. "We honed in on the authentic cuisine and developed 8 to 10 options where the flavors just burst in your mouth. We launched Serranos Mexican Grill in September, and it's been very well received." Offerings include a burrito bowl taco, taco salad and barbacoa, a beef slow braised in garlic, lime, chiles and spices, then shredded, Orman says.
    Many college students prefer meat-free options, says Wojtowicz, so Crossroads always offers at least two to four vegetarian menu options, including cheese pizzas, grilled cheese sandwiches and cheese quesadillas. Other items, such as grilled Provencal vegetable sandwich or black bean and cheese quesadilla also appear.
    At CUC, Wojtowicz has responded to a growing interest in Mediterranean dishes with items like paella, spanakopita, Spanish tapas and other regional favorites.
    Some schools are taking food offerings to the next level by serving vegetables grown in local community gardens. North Central College in Naperville is among schools that has turned to harvesting a community garden to supply a portion of the produce for its dining operation.
    The North Central College Community Garden is now in its second year, and benefits from the efforts of nearby residents, who tend their own plots of land. Because of that support, those gardens "produce some of the fresh vegetables and fruits used in the college's salad bar and deli bar," says director of residence life Kevin McCarthy. The school then labels those items at the dining hall so that students know they are choosing sustainable options grown at the Community Garden.
    Source:

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/special/educationtoday/chi-edtoday-dining-110311,0,7648384.story

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 07/19/2016 - We know that celiac disease afflicts almost 1% of the general population (1). We also know that about 12% of the general population has non-celiac gluten sensitivity, as indicated by elevated IgG class anti-gliadin antibodies in their blood (2). Although elevated antibodies identified by this test are often dismissed as "non-specific", they are clear evidence that the immune system is mounting a reaction against the most common food in our western diet. It is also true that many people who produce these antibodies and have then excluded gluten from their diets have also experienced improved health. Unfortunately, most of the individuals who have elevated IgG anti-gliadin antibodies and might benefit from avoiding gluten do not know that they are gluten sensitive and/or have celiac disease. Thus, we really don't know how many, or which, school children should be avoiding gluten to optimize their academic potential as they work their way through the education system.
    Approaching this issue from a different angle, we know that between 10% and 15% of the U.S. population has dyslexia (3). About 60% of those with ADHD have dyslexia (3). If we calculate the prevalence of ADHD, at 8.8% of the population (4), then just the ADHD component, it should give us 5.28% of the population with dyslexia. But we can't tell how much overlap there is between this group and the group that constitutes between 10% and 15% of the population that are reported as having dyslexia. These disabilities have been given considerable attention and have been studied for some time, yet we really know little about their causes, except in cases of traumatic brain injury.
    However, there is a startling study, reported in The Times ten years ago, from the Nunnykirk School in Northumberland, U.K. (5). The astounding results of this study continue to cry out for further research and possible replication. After 6 months on a gluten-free diet, testing showed that 11 of the 12 (92%) live-in students had improved their reading and comprehension at more than twice the rate at which regular students are expected to improve. Among the 22 students living in the community and attending this special school for dyslexic students during the day, 17 of them (77%) showed similar improvements (5). To put these results in perspective, special needs teachers are often very proud when they can help students achieve at rates similar to regular students. Doubling the rates of improvement is an astonishingly positive result! And a few of these students leaped ahead at six times the rate of normal students! The numbers of students involved in this study are too small to allow us to extrapolate to other dyslexic populations. And, given that the research was done in the United Kingdom, where definitions of learning disabilities, and other factors may be dissimilar, and that the work was reported in a newspaper instead of a peer reviewed journal, and the startlingly positive nature of these results, we really need further, carefully designed studies to explore this phenomenon.
    The Nunnykirk findings are consistent with the extensive brain and neurological research that has been done at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital at the University of Sheffield, over the last two decades, by Marios Hadjivassiliou and his colleagues. They have found that a strict gluten-free diet can often relieve central and peripheral neurological symptoms.
    Further, many prominent researchers who work with children and adults who have dyslexia characterize it as a neurobiological condition, and can demonstrate, with MRI, altered brain function in dyslexia (8). It is also clear that many cases of dyslexia are at least partly genetically conferred (8, 9). Neither are learning disabilities limited to dyslexia. Although some practitioners lump two or more learning disabilities together, the literature distinguishes between dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, dysphasia/aphasia, auditory processing disorders, visual processing disorders, etc. Some such practitioners not only differentiate between types of learning disabilities, they also differentiate between sub-types of disabilities. For instance, motor dysgraphia (where fine motor speed is impaired), dyslexic dysgraphia (where normal fine motor speed allows them to draw or copy but impairs spontaneous writing) and spatial dysgraphia (where handwriting is illegible due to distortion) can each be identified based on symptoms (10). Similar sub-types are seen in other learning disabilities.
    But what if the findings at Nunnykirk School are broadly applicable to all of these types of learning problems? Or perhaps further research can tell us which types and sub-types of learning disabilities can often be alleviated by a gluten-free diet.
    My own professional observations suggest that the number of students helped by a gluten-free diet would be similar to the proportions seen at Nunnykirk School. I have also observed that as the strictness of the diet increases, so does the number of students who improve. However, the diagnosing professionals are becoming reluctant to differentiate, even between general types of learning disabilities such as dyslexia and dysgraphia. As teachers, we were told that a child had learning disabilities and then, if not specified in the documents we were given, we had to figure out exactly what type of disability they had, then devise or research effective ways of teaching these students. I have done a little of both, but my experience is that this choice varies from one teacher to the next, and one situation to the next. Unfortunately, depending on the individual teacher's workload, teaching background, and personal biases, these children can sometimes be neglected or under-served, a choice that is often dictated by excessive workloads and demands on teachers' time to perform other tasks, especially extensive reporting and supervising sports and other extra-curricular activities.
    Please recall the overlap between dyslexia and ADHD mentioned earlier (3), and consider that there are ten reports of connections between attention deficit disorders and celiac disease published in the peer reviewed medical literature. Now, please recall that about 60% of these ADHD children will have dyslexia (3). Since the current, and past issues, of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, require that ADHD and learning disorders each be differentiated from any medical condition that might be causing the same symptoms and be alleviated by resolution of the medical condition in question. On that basis alone, almost every child being considered for a diagnosis of learning disorders or ADHD should be thoroughly tested for celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.
    Yet, I would be very surprised to learn that this is commonly being done. Thus, we have a situation in which we are forced to rely upon a study conducted by a group of teachers, in cooperation with parents and students, that was published in The Times (5) and we must take action on our own because, as yet, celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity are not yet being differentiated from ADHD and/or learning disabilities. The really tragic part of this story is that a gluten-free diet, if started early enough, can reduce or completely eliminate all of these problems with learning disabilities and attention deficits, when gluten is the underlying problem.
    If you or your spouse are gluten sensitive, or have celiac disease, do you also have children who struggle in school? Based on the data from Nunnykirk School, current blood tests are probably not sufficient to rule out those who would benefit from a gluten-free diet. For the moment, you may need to institute a trial of a gluten-free diet, as mentioned above, while we await further research in this area. But wouldn't it be valuable for succeeding generations to know, or have a pretty clear idea whether the diet could help? And with what types and/or sub-types of learning disorders? That's where more research could really help. We already know that there is an association between gluten sensitivity and seizure disorders, ataxia and cerebellar degeneration, neuropathy (damage to peripheral nervous system), schizophrenia, depression, migraine, anxiety disorders, autism, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis (an autoimmune neuromuscular disease), and white matter lesions in the brain (11). It should not be surprising if gluten underlies many or most cases of learning disorders and attention deficits. And if research can tell us which cases would be most likely to benefit from the diet, that will be a huge step forward for parents, students, teachers, and government agencies that provide funding for the education of those who are afflicted with these ailments.
    In the meantime, we only have the information that we have. So, despite its many weaknesses, the Nunnykirk investigation of dyslexic children argues for experimental implementation, on a trial basis. I would suggest at least a six-months-long period of strict gluten avoidance to determine whether it will help individuals who suffer from dyslexia and/or other learning disabilities.
    Sources:
    1. Fasano A, Berti I, Gerarduzzi T, Not T, Colletti RB, Drago S, Elitsur Y, Green PH, Guandalini S, Hill ID, Pietzak M, Ventura A, Thorpe M, Kryszak D, Fornaroli F, Wasserman SS, Murray JA, Horvath K. Prevalence of celiac disease in at-risk and not-at-risk groups in the United States: a large multicenter study. Arch Intern Med. 2003 Feb 10;163(3):286-92.
    2. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald R A, Davies-Jones G A B. Gluten sensitivity as a neurological illness. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2002;72:560-563.
    3. Dyslexia Research Institute http://www.dyslexia-add.org/
    4. National Resource Center on ADHD http://www.help4adhd.org/about/statistics
    5. Blair http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/article1924736.ece
    6. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.
    7. Aziz I, Hadjivassiliou M. Coeliac disease: noncoeliac gluten sensitivity--food for thought. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Jul;11(7):398-9.
    8. Shaywitz SE, Shaywitz BA. The Neurobiology of Reading and Dyslexia. Focus on Basics - Connecting Research & Practice, Volume 5,A: Aug. 2001. http://www.ncsall.net/index.html@id=278.html
    9. Eicher JD, Powers NR, Miller LL, Mueller KL, Mascheretti S, Marino C, Willcutt EG, DeFries JC, Olson RK, Smith SD, Pennington BF, Tomblin JB, Ring SM, Gruen JR. Characterization of the DYX2 locus on chromosome 6p22 with reading disability, language impairment, and IQ. Hum Genet. 2014 Jul;133(7):869-81.
    10. About Education http://specialed.about.com/od/readingliteracy/a/Dyslexia-And-Dysgraphia.htm
    11. Jackson JR, Eaton WW, Cascella NG, Fasano A, Kelly DL.Neurologic and psychiatric manifestations of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Psychiatr Q. 2012 Mar;83(1):91-102.
    12. Diaconu G, Burlea M, Grigore I, Anton DT, Trandafir LM. Celiac disease with neurologic manifestations in children. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 2013 Jan-Mar;117(1):88-94. PubMed PMID: 24505898.
    13. Niederhofer H. Association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and celiac disease: a brief report. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2011;13(3). pii: PCC.10br01104PMCID: PMC3184556.
    14. Niederhofer H, Pittschieler K. A preliminary investigation of ADHD symptoms in persons with celiac disease. J Atten Disord. 2006 Nov;10(2):200-4.
    15. Zelnik N, Pacht A, Obeid R, Lerner A. Range of neurologic disorders in patients with celiac disease. Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):1672-6.
    16. Kozłowska ZE. [Evaluation of mental status of children with malabsorption syndrome after long-term treatment with gluten-free diet (preliminary report)]. Psychiatr Pol. 1991 Mar-Apr;25(2):130-4. Polish.
    17. Diaconu G, Burlea M, Grigore I, Anton DT, Trandafir LM. Celiac disease with neurologic manifestations in children. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 2013 Jan-Mar;117(1):88-94. PubMed PMID: 24505898.
    18. Niederhofer H. Association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and celiac disease: a brief report. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2011;13(3). pii: PCC.10br01104. PMCID: PMC3184556.
    19. Niederhofer H, Pittschieler K. A preliminary investigation of ADHD symptoms in persons with celiac disease. J Atten Disord. 2006 Nov;10(2):200-4.
    20. 4: Zelnik N, Pacht A, Obeid R, Lerner A. Range of neurologic disorders in patients with celiac disease. Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):1672-6.
    21. Kozłowska ZE. [Evaluation of mental status of children with malabsorption syndrome after long-term treatment with gluten-free diet (preliminary report)]. Psychiatr Pol. 1991 Mar-Apr;25(2):130-4. Polish.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Can a Gluten-Free Diet Normalize Vitamin D Levels for Celiac Patients?
    Celiac.com 08/16/2018 - What is the significance of vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients? A pair of researchers recently set out to assess the value and significance of 25(OH) and 1,25(OH) vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients through a comprehensive review of medical literature.
    Researchers included F Zingone and C Ciacci are affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy; and the Celiac Center, AOU San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi di Aragona, University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Salerno, Italy. 
    Within the wide spectrum of symptoms and alteration of systems that characterizes celiac disease, several studies indicate a low-level of vitamin D, therefore recent guidelines suggest its evaluation at the time of diagnosis. This review examines the data from existing studies in which vitamin D has been assessed in celiac patients. 
    Our review indicates that most of the studies on vitamin D in adult celiac disease report a 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency at diagnosis that disappears when the patient goes on a gluten-free diet, independently of any supplementation. Instead, the researchers found that levels of calcitriol, the active 1,25 (OH) form of vitamin D, fell within the normal range at the time of celiac diagnosis. 
    Basically, their study strongly suggests that people with celiac disease can recover normal vitamin D levels through a gluten-free diet, without requiring any supplementation.
    Source:
    Dig Liver Dis. 2018 Aug;50(8):757-760. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2018.04.005. Epub 2018 Apr 13.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Could Gluten-Free Food Be Hurting Your Dog?
    Celiac.com 08/15/2018 - Grain-free food has been linked to heart disease in dogs. A canine cardiovascular disease that has historically been seen in just a few breeds is becoming more common in other breeds, and one possible culprit is grain-free dog food. 
    The disease in question is called canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and often results in congestive heart failure. DCM is historically common in large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers, though it is also affects some Cocker Spaniels.  Numerous cases of DCM have been reported in smaller dogs, whose primary source of nutrition was food containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. These reported atypical DCM cases included Golden and Labrador Retrievers, a Whippet, a Shih Tzu, a Bulldog and Miniature Schnauzers, as well as mixed breeds. 
    As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine, along with a group of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, is investigating the possible link between DCM and pet foods containing seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. The good news is that in cases where the dog suffers no genetic component, and the disease is caught early, simple veterinary treatment and dietary change may improve heart function.
    According to Nutritional Outlook, an industry publication for makers of dietary supplements and healthy foods and beverages, there is a growing market for “free from” foods for dogs, especially gluten-free and grain-free formulations. In 2017, about one in five dog foods launched was gluten-free. So, do dogs really need to eat grain-free or gluten-free food? Probably not, according to PetMD, which notes that many pet owners are simply projecting their own food biases when choosing dog food.
    Genetically, dogs are well adapted to easily digest grains and other carbohydrates. Also, beef and dairy remain the most common allergens for dogs, so even dogs with allergies are unlikely to need to need grain-free food. 
    So, the take away here seems to be that most dogs don’t need grain-free or gluten-free food, and that it might actually be bad for the dog, not good, as the owner might imagine.
    Stay tuned for more on the FDA’s investigation and any findings they make.
    Read more at Bizjournals.com
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Did You Miss the Gluten-Free Fireworks This Past Fourth of July?
    Celiac.com 08/14/2018 - Occasionally, Celiac.com learns of an amusing gluten-free story after the fact. Such is the case of the “Gluten-Free Fireworks.” 
    We recently learned about a funny little event that happened leading up to Fourth of July celebrations in the town of Springdale in Northwest Arkansas. It seems that a sign advertising "Gluten Free Fireworks" popped up near a fireworks stand on interstate 49 in Springdale. 
    In case you missed the recent dose of Fourth of July humor, in an effort to attract customers and provide a bit of holiday levity, Pinnacle Fireworks put up a sign advertising "gluten-free fireworks.” 
    The small company is owned by Adam Keeley and his father. "A lot of the people that come in want to crack a joke right along with you," Keeley said. "Every now and then, you will get someone that comes in and says so fireworks are supposed to be gluten-free right? Have I been buying fireworks that have gluten? So then I say no, no they are gluten-free. It's just a little fun."
    Keeley said that their stand saw a steady flow of customers in the week leading up to the Fourth. In addition to selling “gluten-free” fireworks, each fireworks package sold by Pinnacle features a QR code. The code can be scanned with a smartphone. The link leads to a video showing what the fireworks look like.
    We at Celiac.com hope you and your family had a safe, enjoyable, and, yes, gluten-free Fourth of July. Stay tuned for more on gluten-free fireworks and other zany, tongue-in-cheek stories.
    Read more at kark.com
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Stress-Related Disorders Associated with Higher Risk for Autoimmune Disease
    Celiac.com 08/13/2018 - It’s not uncommon for people to have psychiatric reactions to stressful life events, and these reactions may trigger some immune dysfunction. Researchers don’t yet know whether such reactions increase overall risk of autoimmune disease.
    Are psychiatric reactions induced by trauma or other life stressors associated with subsequent risk of autoimmune disease? Are stress-related disorders significantly associated with risk of subsequent autoimmune disease?
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether there is an association between stress-related disorders and subsequent autoimmune disease. The research team included Huan Song, MD, PhD; Fang Fang, MD, PhD; Gunnar Tomasson, MD, PhD; Filip K. Arnberg, PhD; David Mataix-Cols, PhD; Lorena Fernández de la Cruz, PhD; Catarina Almqvist, MD, PhD; Katja Fall, MD, PhD; Unnur A. Valdimarsdóttir, PhD.
    They are variously affiliated with the Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Centre for Rheumatology Research, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; the Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; the Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; the Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; the Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; and the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
    The team conducted a Swedish register-based retrospective cohort study that included 106, 464 patients with stress-related disorders, 1,064 ,640 matched unexposed individuals, and 126 ,652 full siblings to determine whether a clinical diagnosis of stress-related disorders was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease.
    The team identified stress-related disorder and autoimmune diseases using the National Patient Register. They used Cox model to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs of 41 autoimmune diseases beyond 1 year after the diagnosis of stress-related disorders, controlling for multiple risk factors.
    The data showed that being diagnosed with a stress-related disorder, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, acute stress reaction, adjustment disorder, and other stress reactions, was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease, compared with matched unexposed individuals. The team is calling for further studies to better understand the associations and the underlying factors.
    Source:
    JAMA. 2018;319(23):2388-2400. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.7028  

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-Free Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Breasts
    Celiac.com 08/11/2018 - Need a quick, easy, reliable gluten-free dish that will satisfy everyone and leave the cook with plenty of time to relax? This recipe is sure to do the trick. Best of all, it's super easy. Just grab some chicken breasts, season them, hit them with a sprig of rosemary, wrap some bacon around them, and chuck them on the grill and call it dinner. Okay, you can add some rice and veggies.
    Ingredients:
    4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves 4 thick slices bacon 4 teaspoons garlic powder 4 small sprigs fresh rosemary salt and pepper to taste Directions:
    Heat an outdoor grill to medium-high heat, and lightly oil the grate.
    Sprinkle 1 teaspoon garlic powder on a chicken breast and season with salt and pepper. 
    Place a rosemary sprig on each chicken breast. 
    Wrap the bacon around the chicken and the rosemary. 
    Hold bacon in place with a toothpick or extra rosemary stem.
    Cook the chicken breasts until no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, about 8 minutes per side. 
    Keep an eye out for any grill flare ups from the bacon grease. 
    Remove the toothpicks and serve with steamed rice and your favorite vegetables for a winning meal.