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    Kim Hopkins
    Celiac.com 06/24/2009 - If you are like the majority of people diagnosed with celiac disease, it probably took you many years of experiencing debilitating symptoms, talking to multiple doctors who gave you varied theories and diagnoses, thinking that you would never feel better…before you finally got it figured out.  Whether you had a positive experience with your health care professionals or not, hearing the diagnosis can lead to feeling lost and unsure of what to do next.  It can be quite overwhelming.  After all, food plays an important part in our culture – it’s how we share special moments together, celebrate, and nurture one another.  A big sense of loss can overcome someone when they hear that they can no longer eat wheat, barley, rye, and contaminated oats.  Some people say they go through the roller coaster of emotions similar to the grieving process.
    Can you make the necessary lifestyle adjustments to feel better and regain your health?  Absolutely!  Everyone’s pace is different and you need to give yourself time.  Is there a way that may help you to adjust a bit more quickly and with less frustration?  Yes:  consider hiring a personal coach that specializes in food challenges.
    What Is A Personal Coach?
    Coaching is a powerful, ongoing relationship which focuses on clients making important changes in their lives.  Coaching uses a process of inquiry and personal discovery to build a client’s level of awareness and responsibility, and provides the client with structure, support, and feedback.  The coaching process helps clients to both define and achieve personal and professional goals faster and with more ease than would be possible otherwise.   In coaching, the focus is on designing the future, not getting over the past.
    The field of coaching is booming and there are many coaching niche areas.  Business coaching for executives and teams has become quite popular.  Coaching children and teens to help them excel with academics is on the rise, as is parenting coaching.  Many small business owners higher coaches to help them increase revenue.
    Coaching usually occurs in the context of a long-term relationship, where the client’s goals, dreams, and vision drive the action.  The belief is that there are multiple paths to reach a goal, and that the client knows the way (though they might not realize it at the time).  The coach assists the client to become a “change master.”  To this end, coaching and adjustment to dietary changes go hand-in-hand.
    A Personal Coach Specializing In Dietary Restrictions Can Help You To:

    Learn the gluten-free lifestyle - Where to buy gluten-free food, product reviews, how to prepare gluten-free recipes, where to eat out, how to become a skilled label reader, understanding the safe & unsafe ingredient lists, decrease cross-contamination risk, how to set up your kitchen, where to find out if your cosmetics, hair care products, and medications are safe. Develop a support network - Website resources, how to get the most out of your primary care doctor, engaging a specialist such as a dietician or nutritionist. Vary your diet, taking into consideration essential nutrients. Adjust for the financial impact- Learn to live gluten-free on a budget. Brush up on your advocacy and education skills – Practice explaining celiac to friends, relatives, and coworkers, advocate to you/your child’s school, learn how to eat out safely, manage your anxiety. Monitor any ongoing symptoms and known associate health risks - Iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, fertility problems, leaky gut syndrome, candida, food sensitivities, other auto-immune disorders. Keep up on the latest research and what it may mean for you – there are many exciting studies happening that may have an impact on how you take care of yourself. Assist with other goals to help your life feel more balanced.
    How Does Coaching Work?
    Generally, most coaches have a structure that includes three to four sessions each month, with quick check-ins by phone and email in between.  Coaching sessions can be either one-on-one, in small groups, or a combination of both.  They can be in-person, via phone, or a combination of both throughout the month, which allows for financial and logistical flexibility.  In-person sessions can include shopping, practice with advocating, and cooking.A coach will encourage clients to set goals that they truly want, ask them to do more than they have done on their own, help them focus in order to produce results more quickly, and provide the tools, information, support, and structure to help them accomplish more.   It’s like having a personal trainer to assist you with making adjustments to improve your life.
    Who Should Consider Hiring A Coach?

    If you are feeling unsure as to how to adjust your lifestyle around your food challenges. If you are feeling limited by food allergies/intolerance/sensitivities. If you are not sure where to go for information or are overwhelmed by all the information you are finding. If you are restricting yourself from enjoying going out to restaurants, parties, etc. If you are having difficulty sticking to the gluten-free diet. It’s important to find someone that you “click” with.  Most coachesoffer a free initial session to help get to know them, and to answerany questions you might have about the coaching process.

    Kim Hopkins
    Plan your meals:  It sounds simple, but it’s one that is often ignored.  Sit down before you do your weekly grocery run.  Know what you are going to make for each meal including snacks.  Find out what’s on sale before you make your weekly meal plan.  Stick to the list when you shop! Develop a file of dependable, go to gluten-free recipes.  My people report that, when they are short on time, that’s when they are likely to make extravagant purchases.  Take the thinking and guess work out of meal planning by looking through your file.  You can even write down the estimated cost of the meal. Eat foods that are naturally gluten free found at the regular grocery store.  Corn tortillas are cheap and have many uses, including for sandwich wraps.  Beans are a nutrient-rich starch substitute, as are lentils. Eat whole foods.  Whether you are gluten-free or not, it is healthier not to eat packaged, processed foods.  Just because a product is marked gluten free doesn’t mean it’s good for you.  Processed gluten-free products often lack nutrients.  Limit these to a couple times per week or less. Eat foods that are in season.  This means they had to travel less far to reach your grocery store, therefore they will be cheaper. Grow your own.  Learn how to can and/or jar the extras.  Live in a cool climate?  Some veggies can be started inside. Make a soup.  Soups are filling, and they are a great way to use up items in the fridge. Eat more vegetarian and vegan meals.  Eliminating meat from two dinners per week will save you quite a bit of money. Eat breakfast for dinner.  Make a frittata – cook 3 strips of bacon in a skillet.  Set aside and drain off most of the fat.  Add diced onions.  Cook for 5 minutes.  Add diced red pepper.  Cook another 5 minutes.  Add a package of thawed, drained frozen spinach.  Salt and pepper to taste.  Add bacon back in.  Beat 5 eggs and pour them all over the filling.  Top with cheese and bake at 350 for 8 – 12 minutes, or until the eggs are set.  Serves 2 – 3. Get creative.  For thickening sauces or gravy, substitute equal amounts of cornstarch for flour.  Mashed potato flakes also make a great, inexpensive thickener and binder in place of breadcrumbs. Xanthan gum is used in many gluten-free recipes to serve as the “glue” to hold the product together; use 2 tsp. unflavored gelatin to replace 1tsp. xanthum gum in some recipes such as cookies. Cornmeal or crushed potato chips can be substituted when a recipe calls for a coating or crunchy topping. Buy in bulk.  Once you found something you like, save big by buying in a large quantity.  The Gluten-Free Mall  has bulk discounts and many other ways to save you money. See their "Shop Smart & Save Money!" section on the top-right corner of their site.
    Create or join a bulk buying group.  Ask around at your local support group, or link up with local folks online.  If you like the same products buy a bulk order and split it. Cook ahead and freeze meals in individual or family-size servings.  If you are not someone that cooks and you are watching your budget, it makes sense to learn. Invest in a good vacuum food sealer.  This will help keep leftovers fresh for longer = less waste. Bake 1-2 times per month.  Things like Pizza crusts, bread, and pie crusts will freeze well if wrapped properly. Make gluten-free cookie dough from scratch and freeze in a roll.  Cut and bake what you need.  This will curb your desire to buy an expensive mix. Start a gluten-free dinner swap (like a holiday cookie swap).  Get a few families to cook up a large quantity of gluten-free meals and swap them for variety! Join a food co-op.  Co-ops are groups who use their purchasing power to get lower prices. Make your own blend of gluten-free flours ahead of time and store in an air tight container. To prevent contamination, purchase extra appliances (like a toaster) from Craig’s List or Goodwill. Track your purchases.  Seeing it in black and white can be very revealing. Consult with your employer’s human resources department.  Do they offer a flexible spending account (FSA) benefit?  These accounts hold your money pre-tax for medical purchases.  If so, will the FSA recognize gluten free food (and related shipping charges)?  Get it in writing!  If your employer doesn’t offer this benefit, ask them to look into it.  This will save you about 30%. If you are not using an FSA and you spend a lot of money on medical expenses, consult with your accountant.  Are a portion of your gluten-free food purchases tax deductible?  Shipping charges often can be reimbursed from this account, as can mileage to and from specialty stores.

    Rick Lenger
    Celiac.com 10/12/2009 - It has been 9 months since my celiac diagnosis. It seems hard for me to believe that until January 23, 2009 I had never even heard of celiac disease. I have made up for lost time in the past few months. Hopefully, my story will help others who are newly diagnosed with celiac disease to hang on to hope and be encouraged that things are going to get better – much better as they move into a gluten free lifestyle. 
    In 1971 I had a panic attack. I have never been the same since that day. I won’t go into the details of it because most people know what a panic attack is like.  So I had a complete physical which included blood panels for the first time. When I got the results I found out I had an extremely elevated alkaline phosphatase level (400), normal is 80-130. My first thought was, “What the heck is alkaline phosphatase?”  The doctor was alarmed.  He ran more tests and suggested a liver biopsy.  He thought I might have liver cancer. No liver disease was found. From that panic attack until my celiac diagnosis I was always anxious about my liver. I also fought the fear of more panic attacks.   Nothing was ever conclusive. It just hung out there for over 35 years.  Every time I changed doctors and had my blood tested I went through the same series of tests and concerns. Nothing definitive was ever diagnosed.  Finally, my doctor told me my elevated counts were “normal for me.”
    Fast forward to the year 2003.  Without any reason I lost 20 lbs. over an 8 week period. I thought it was kind of cool to be “skinny”. I had always being kind of “doughy.” When I had a physical I found my alk-phos was now over 400.  I was anemic and more fatigued than ever.  My doctor wanted me to have a colonoscopy and an endoscopy. He said he was more worried about the anemia than the high alkaline phosphate. I had a colonoscopy, but refused the endoscopy on grounds that I couldn’t bear the thought of having a tube put down my esophagus.  What a mistake!  I could have gotten this diagnosis 6 years earlier.  The colonoscopy revealed no disease. When I did finally have an endoscopy in 2009 I was totally sedated and the test took about 4 minutes. It was the easiest test I’ve ever had.  My doctor thought I was depressed and put me on anti-depressants.  After adjusting to the meds I think I felt a little better, but deep down I knew something major was going on.  I figured if I were the President I would be sent to the Mayo Clinic for a couple of weeks and they would find out what was plaguing me. I thought my problem could be found only by the best doctors in the world and it would be at great expense – more than I could afford, so I decided to just live the best I could.
    Before my diagnosis I was not absorbing many, if any, nutrients.  At 6’2” I was a gaunt 156 lbs.  I had rapid heart beat, shortness of breath, fatigue, anemia, terrible muscle cramps all the intestinal issues known to man. Numerous blood counts were way off. The 98 lb. weakling at the beach could have kicked sand in my face all day long. My wife told me she couldn’t look at me anymore. It’s hard to look at someone who is suffering from serious malnutrition.  Everything I ate went right through me.  I didn’t think about it at the time, but as I reflect back on it I know I would have died by now if I hadn’t gotten off the gluten. Now I can see signs of celiac since childhood. I was delayed in reaching puberty until I was a junior in high school. I also had fears that we not reasonable.  There were some things going on neurologically for sure.

    I began feeling better within a few days after being diagnosed and going gluten free last January.  My weight began going up, and I just knew the anemia would go away and so would the high alk-phos.  6 weeks after diagnosis (March 2009) I went in for a blood test.  I was convinced the bloodwork would show normal levels in every category. I was proud and giddy.  I couldn’t wait to get the results.  Surprise, surprise!  The blood count for anemia had not changed and the alkaline phosphatase was over 600! What the heck was going on!  At least I felt better.
    I stumbled across a couple of articles on the internet about high alkaline phosphatase in celiacs and possible reasons.  Many celiacs have low calcium and vitamin D, and in some cases it causes high alk-phos.  Without getting too technical it seems that the alk-phos plays a role in bone growth and can go into overdrive when calcium and Vitamin D are extremely low. The solution for us may be in taking lots of calcium and Vitamin D supplements.  I know this is controversial, but I decided to go directly to the source of vitamin D (the Sun) for 15 minutes of sunlight each day.  I also have been taking a great gluten free calcium/magnesium supplement for the past 6 months.  Last week I went in for more bloodwork.  I know I continue to feel better all of the time, but after my last blood work I’m a little nervous about the actual results.  The nurse called me the day after the blood was drawn and told me my count for anemia is now in the low normal range and the alkaline phosphatase is 300!  It had dropped 300 points in 6 months.  I think I’m on to something.  I feel like I’m on the right track and will continue the supplements. I haven’t mentioned how low my cholesterol was in January.  The LDL was 33 and the HDL was 18.  The total cholesterol was 61. The doctor said it was the lowest cholesterol he had ever seen! Now it has gone up to a total of 140!  Something is definitely working!  I think just being gluten free for 9 months has been better than anything else, but I continue to be hopeful about the calcium and vitamin D supplements.
     I have gained 50 healthy lbs. since discovering I’m a full blown, card carrying celiac. I’m working out every other day with weights and I figure of the 50 extra lbs. about 25 of it is muscle and the rest is fat.  Oh well.  I do look better.  My wife can look at me again and I can even look at myself once in a while. I had no idea what it was like to feel normal.  Good things can be found through every struggle. Were it not for these trials I would not have found my faith and learned to trust God. I wouldn’t change that for anything. Everything happens for a reason. I do wonder what I may have done with my life had I been gluten free from birth.  I don’t spend too much time thinking about it, though, since I can do nothing to change it. I consider it miraculous that I could have been in education as a teacher and administrator for 32 years before I hit the wall in 2005.   I’m 60 years old now.  I really look forward to the future. I feel like my best years are ahead of me.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/10/2011 - Like a lot of people, Lenord Dorr loves beer.  In fact, Lenord Dorr loves beer so much, he opened his own homebrew store. Unlike most people, though, who love beer and open beer-brewing shops, Lenord Dorr also has celiac disease.
    Now, in general, loving beer and brewing beer does not jibe well with having celiac disease, since people with celiac disease have bad reactions to the wheat, and barley so central to the brewing process.
    For Dorr, however, celiac disease and the love of beer and brewing is driving spark behind his own homebrew store.
    "In 2001, I got sick with celiac, and gluten-free beers were just not available," said Dorr. "So I started brewing my own beers."
    Ultimately, Dorr said, brewing gluten-free beers became a passion that "grew into my own business."
    Dorr's shop offers the beginners through the professional brewer a complete range of ingredients and equipment for making wine or beer. Everything from Colorado grains, specialty sugars, malt extracts, and the equipment needed to magically turn those ingredients into a favorite brew.
    Of course, Dorr offers plenty of ingredients to make gluten-free beers.
    "There are more brewers than I thought," Dorr said. "There are a lot out there and many more who want to be."
    Dorr and his wife, Rebecca, opened the doors to the Homebrew Connection just after Thanksgiving, and they have since sold 14 new beer-brewing kits.
    "We'll have 14 new brewers after Christmas. That's exciting," Dorr said.
    The Homebrew Connection is located just off Main Street at 20 S. Nevada Avenue in Montrose, Colorado. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.
    Link: www.thehomebrewconnection.com


  • Recent Articles

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years
    between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its coeliac disease, a sensitivity to the
    protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When
    you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible.
    As awareness of coeliac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities
    are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the
    list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the
    top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of
    gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city.
    The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture
    rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included.
    Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list,
    including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts
    the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge
    330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their
    variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this
    list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe
    eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:

     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com