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    Kim Hopkins
    Celiac.com 06/24/2009 - If you are like the majority of people diagnosed with celiac disease, it probably took you many years of experiencing debilitating symptoms, talking to multiple doctors who gave you varied theories and diagnoses, thinking that you would never feel better…before you finally got it figured out.  Whether you had a positive experience with your health care professionals or not, hearing the diagnosis can lead to feeling lost and unsure of what to do next.  It can be quite overwhelming.  After all, food plays an important part in our culture – it’s how we share special moments together, celebrate, and nurture one another.  A big sense of loss can overcome someone when they hear that they can no longer eat wheat, barley, rye, and contaminated oats.  Some people say they go through the roller coaster of emotions similar to the grieving process.
    Can you make the necessary lifestyle adjustments to feel better and regain your health?  Absolutely!  Everyone’s pace is different and you need to give yourself time.  Is there a way that may help you to adjust a bit more quickly and with less frustration?  Yes:  consider hiring a personal coach that specializes in food challenges.
    What Is A Personal Coach?
    Coaching is a powerful, ongoing relationship which focuses on clients making important changes in their lives.  Coaching uses a process of inquiry and personal discovery to build a client’s level of awareness and responsibility, and provides the client with structure, support, and feedback.  The coaching process helps clients to both define and achieve personal and professional goals faster and with more ease than would be possible otherwise.   In coaching, the focus is on designing the future, not getting over the past.
    The field of coaching is booming and there are many coaching niche areas.  Business coaching for executives and teams has become quite popular.  Coaching children and teens to help them excel with academics is on the rise, as is parenting coaching.  Many small business owners higher coaches to help them increase revenue.
    Coaching usually occurs in the context of a long-term relationship, where the client’s goals, dreams, and vision drive the action.  The belief is that there are multiple paths to reach a goal, and that the client knows the way (though they might not realize it at the time).  The coach assists the client to become a “change master.”  To this end, coaching and adjustment to dietary changes go hand-in-hand.
    A Personal Coach Specializing In Dietary Restrictions Can Help You To:

    Learn the gluten-free lifestyle - Where to buy gluten-free food, product reviews, how to prepare gluten-free recipes, where to eat out, how to become a skilled label reader, understanding the safe & unsafe ingredient lists, decrease cross-contamination risk, how to set up your kitchen, where to find out if your cosmetics, hair care products, and medications are safe. Develop a support network - Website resources, how to get the most out of your primary care doctor, engaging a specialist such as a dietician or nutritionist. Vary your diet, taking into consideration essential nutrients. Adjust for the financial impact- Learn to live gluten-free on a budget. Brush up on your advocacy and education skills – Practice explaining celiac to friends, relatives, and coworkers, advocate to you/your child’s school, learn how to eat out safely, manage your anxiety. Monitor any ongoing symptoms and known associate health risks - Iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, fertility problems, leaky gut syndrome, candida, food sensitivities, other auto-immune disorders. Keep up on the latest research and what it may mean for you – there are many exciting studies happening that may have an impact on how you take care of yourself. Assist with other goals to help your life feel more balanced.
    How Does Coaching Work?
    Generally, most coaches have a structure that includes three to four sessions each month, with quick check-ins by phone and email in between.  Coaching sessions can be either one-on-one, in small groups, or a combination of both.  They can be in-person, via phone, or a combination of both throughout the month, which allows for financial and logistical flexibility.  In-person sessions can include shopping, practice with advocating, and cooking.A coach will encourage clients to set goals that they truly want, ask them to do more than they have done on their own, help them focus in order to produce results more quickly, and provide the tools, information, support, and structure to help them accomplish more.   It’s like having a personal trainer to assist you with making adjustments to improve your life.
    Who Should Consider Hiring A Coach?

    If you are feeling unsure as to how to adjust your lifestyle around your food challenges. If you are feeling limited by food allergies/intolerance/sensitivities. If you are not sure where to go for information or are overwhelmed by all the information you are finding. If you are restricting yourself from enjoying going out to restaurants, parties, etc. If you are having difficulty sticking to the gluten-free diet. It’s important to find someone that you “click” with.  Most coachesoffer a free initial session to help get to know them, and to answerany questions you might have about the coaching process.

    Kim Hopkins
    Plan your meals:  It sounds simple, but it’s one that is often ignored.  Sit down before you do your weekly grocery run.  Know what you are going to make for each meal including snacks.  Find out what’s on sale before you make your weekly meal plan.  Stick to the list when you shop! Develop a file of dependable, go to gluten-free recipes.  My people report that, when they are short on time, that’s when they are likely to make extravagant purchases.  Take the thinking and guess work out of meal planning by looking through your file.  You can even write down the estimated cost of the meal. Eat foods that are naturally gluten free found at the regular grocery store.  Corn tortillas are cheap and have many uses, including for sandwich wraps.  Beans are a nutrient-rich starch substitute, as are lentils. Eat whole foods.  Whether you are gluten-free or not, it is healthier not to eat packaged, processed foods.  Just because a product is marked gluten free doesn’t mean it’s good for you.  Processed gluten-free products often lack nutrients.  Limit these to a couple times per week or less. Eat foods that are in season.  This means they had to travel less far to reach your grocery store, therefore they will be cheaper. Grow your own.  Learn how to can and/or jar the extras.  Live in a cool climate?  Some veggies can be started inside. Make a soup.  Soups are filling, and they are a great way to use up items in the fridge. Eat more vegetarian and vegan meals.  Eliminating meat from two dinners per week will save you quite a bit of money. Eat breakfast for dinner.  Make a frittata – cook 3 strips of bacon in a skillet.  Set aside and drain off most of the fat.  Add diced onions.  Cook for 5 minutes.  Add diced red pepper.  Cook another 5 minutes.  Add a package of thawed, drained frozen spinach.  Salt and pepper to taste.  Add bacon back in.  Beat 5 eggs and pour them all over the filling.  Top with cheese and bake at 350 for 8 – 12 minutes, or until the eggs are set.  Serves 2 – 3. Get creative.  For thickening sauces or gravy, substitute equal amounts of cornstarch for flour.  Mashed potato flakes also make a great, inexpensive thickener and binder in place of breadcrumbs. Xanthan gum is used in many gluten-free recipes to serve as the “glue” to hold the product together; use 2 tsp. unflavored gelatin to replace 1tsp. xanthum gum in some recipes such as cookies. Cornmeal or crushed potato chips can be substituted when a recipe calls for a coating or crunchy topping. Buy in bulk.  Once you found something you like, save big by buying in a large quantity.  The Gluten-Free Mall  has bulk discounts and many other ways to save you money. See their "Shop Smart & Save Money!" section on the top-right corner of their site.
    Create or join a bulk buying group.  Ask around at your local support group, or link up with local folks online.  If you like the same products buy a bulk order and split it. Cook ahead and freeze meals in individual or family-size servings.  If you are not someone that cooks and you are watching your budget, it makes sense to learn. Invest in a good vacuum food sealer.  This will help keep leftovers fresh for longer = less waste. Bake 1-2 times per month.  Things like Pizza crusts, bread, and pie crusts will freeze well if wrapped properly. Make gluten-free cookie dough from scratch and freeze in a roll.  Cut and bake what you need.  This will curb your desire to buy an expensive mix. Start a gluten-free dinner swap (like a holiday cookie swap).  Get a few families to cook up a large quantity of gluten-free meals and swap them for variety! Join a food co-op.  Co-ops are groups who use their purchasing power to get lower prices. Make your own blend of gluten-free flours ahead of time and store in an air tight container. To prevent contamination, purchase extra appliances (like a toaster) from Craig’s List or Goodwill. Track your purchases.  Seeing it in black and white can be very revealing. Consult with your employer’s human resources department.  Do they offer a flexible spending account (FSA) benefit?  These accounts hold your money pre-tax for medical purchases.  If so, will the FSA recognize gluten free food (and related shipping charges)?  Get it in writing!  If your employer doesn’t offer this benefit, ask them to look into it.  This will save you about 30%. If you are not using an FSA and you spend a lot of money on medical expenses, consult with your accountant.  Are a portion of your gluten-free food purchases tax deductible?  Shipping charges often can be reimbursed from this account, as can mileage to and from specialty stores.

    Rick Lenger
    Celiac.com 10/12/2009 - It has been 9 months since my celiac diagnosis. It seems hard for me to believe that until January 23, 2009 I had never even heard of celiac disease. I have made up for lost time in the past few months. Hopefully, my story will help others who are newly diagnosed with celiac disease to hang on to hope and be encouraged that things are going to get better – much better as they move into a gluten free lifestyle. 
    In 1971 I had a panic attack. I have never been the same since that day. I won’t go into the details of it because most people know what a panic attack is like.  So I had a complete physical which included blood panels for the first time. When I got the results I found out I had an extremely elevated alkaline phosphatase level (400), normal is 80-130. My first thought was, “What the heck is alkaline phosphatase?”  The doctor was alarmed.  He ran more tests and suggested a liver biopsy.  He thought I might have liver cancer. No liver disease was found. From that panic attack until my celiac diagnosis I was always anxious about my liver. I also fought the fear of more panic attacks.   Nothing was ever conclusive. It just hung out there for over 35 years.  Every time I changed doctors and had my blood tested I went through the same series of tests and concerns. Nothing definitive was ever diagnosed.  Finally, my doctor told me my elevated counts were “normal for me.”
    Fast forward to the year 2003.  Without any reason I lost 20 lbs. over an 8 week period. I thought it was kind of cool to be “skinny”. I had always being kind of “doughy.” When I had a physical I found my alk-phos was now over 400.  I was anemic and more fatigued than ever.  My doctor wanted me to have a colonoscopy and an endoscopy. He said he was more worried about the anemia than the high alkaline phosphate. I had a colonoscopy, but refused the endoscopy on grounds that I couldn’t bear the thought of having a tube put down my esophagus.  What a mistake!  I could have gotten this diagnosis 6 years earlier.  The colonoscopy revealed no disease. When I did finally have an endoscopy in 2009 I was totally sedated and the test took about 4 minutes. It was the easiest test I’ve ever had.  My doctor thought I was depressed and put me on anti-depressants.  After adjusting to the meds I think I felt a little better, but deep down I knew something major was going on.  I figured if I were the President I would be sent to the Mayo Clinic for a couple of weeks and they would find out what was plaguing me. I thought my problem could be found only by the best doctors in the world and it would be at great expense – more than I could afford, so I decided to just live the best I could.
    Before my diagnosis I was not absorbing many, if any, nutrients.  At 6’2” I was a gaunt 156 lbs.  I had rapid heart beat, shortness of breath, fatigue, anemia, terrible muscle cramps all the intestinal issues known to man. Numerous blood counts were way off. The 98 lb. weakling at the beach could have kicked sand in my face all day long. My wife told me she couldn’t look at me anymore. It’s hard to look at someone who is suffering from serious malnutrition.  Everything I ate went right through me.  I didn’t think about it at the time, but as I reflect back on it I know I would have died by now if I hadn’t gotten off the gluten. Now I can see signs of celiac since childhood. I was delayed in reaching puberty until I was a junior in high school. I also had fears that we not reasonable.  There were some things going on neurologically for sure.

    I began feeling better within a few days after being diagnosed and going gluten free last January.  My weight began going up, and I just knew the anemia would go away and so would the high alk-phos.  6 weeks after diagnosis (March 2009) I went in for a blood test.  I was convinced the bloodwork would show normal levels in every category. I was proud and giddy.  I couldn’t wait to get the results.  Surprise, surprise!  The blood count for anemia had not changed and the alkaline phosphatase was over 600! What the heck was going on!  At least I felt better.
    I stumbled across a couple of articles on the internet about high alkaline phosphatase in celiacs and possible reasons.  Many celiacs have low calcium and vitamin D, and in some cases it causes high alk-phos.  Without getting too technical it seems that the alk-phos plays a role in bone growth and can go into overdrive when calcium and Vitamin D are extremely low. The solution for us may be in taking lots of calcium and Vitamin D supplements.  I know this is controversial, but I decided to go directly to the source of vitamin D (the Sun) for 15 minutes of sunlight each day.  I also have been taking a great gluten free calcium/magnesium supplement for the past 6 months.  Last week I went in for more bloodwork.  I know I continue to feel better all of the time, but after my last blood work I’m a little nervous about the actual results.  The nurse called me the day after the blood was drawn and told me my count for anemia is now in the low normal range and the alkaline phosphatase is 300!  It had dropped 300 points in 6 months.  I think I’m on to something.  I feel like I’m on the right track and will continue the supplements. I haven’t mentioned how low my cholesterol was in January.  The LDL was 33 and the HDL was 18.  The total cholesterol was 61. The doctor said it was the lowest cholesterol he had ever seen! Now it has gone up to a total of 140!  Something is definitely working!  I think just being gluten free for 9 months has been better than anything else, but I continue to be hopeful about the calcium and vitamin D supplements.
     I have gained 50 healthy lbs. since discovering I’m a full blown, card carrying celiac. I’m working out every other day with weights and I figure of the 50 extra lbs. about 25 of it is muscle and the rest is fat.  Oh well.  I do look better.  My wife can look at me again and I can even look at myself once in a while. I had no idea what it was like to feel normal.  Good things can be found through every struggle. Were it not for these trials I would not have found my faith and learned to trust God. I wouldn’t change that for anything. Everything happens for a reason. I do wonder what I may have done with my life had I been gluten free from birth.  I don’t spend too much time thinking about it, though, since I can do nothing to change it. I consider it miraculous that I could have been in education as a teacher and administrator for 32 years before I hit the wall in 2005.   I’m 60 years old now.  I really look forward to the future. I feel like my best years are ahead of me.


    Jefferson Adams
    Love of Beer Fuels Gluten-free Brewer
    Celiac.com 02/10/2011 - Like a lot of people, Lenord Dorr loves beer.  In fact, Lenord Dorr loves beer so much, he opened his own homebrew store. Unlike most people, though, who love beer and open beer-brewing shops, Lenord Dorr also has celiac disease.
    Now, in general, loving beer and brewing beer does not jibe well with having celiac disease, since people with celiac disease have bad reactions to the wheat, and barley so central to the brewing process.
    For Dorr, however, celiac disease and the love of beer and brewing is driving spark behind his own homebrew store.
    "In 2001, I got sick with celiac, and gluten-free beers were just not available," said Dorr. "So I started brewing my own beers."
    Ultimately, Dorr said, brewing gluten-free beers became a passion that "grew into my own business."
    Dorr's shop offers the beginners through the professional brewer a complete range of ingredients and equipment for making wine or beer. Everything from Colorado grains, specialty sugars, malt extracts, and the equipment needed to magically turn those ingredients into a favorite brew.
    Of course, Dorr offers plenty of ingredients to make gluten-free beers.
    "There are more brewers than I thought," Dorr said. "There are a lot out there and many more who want to be."
    Dorr and his wife, Rebecca, opened the doors to the Homebrew Connection just after Thanksgiving, and they have since sold 14 new beer-brewing kits.
    "We'll have 14 new brewers after Christmas. That's exciting," Dorr said.
    The Homebrew Connection is located just off Main Street at 20 S. Nevada Avenue in Montrose, Colorado. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.
    Link: www.thehomebrewconnection.com


  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Did You Miss the Gluten-Free Fireworks This Past Fourth of July?
    Celiac.com 08/14/2018 - Occasionally, Celiac.com learns of an amusing gluten-free story after the fact. Such is the case of the “Gluten-Free Fireworks.” 
    We recently learned about a funny little event that happened leading up to Fourth of July celebrations in the town of Springdale in Northwest Arkansas. It seems that a sign advertising "Gluten Free Fireworks" popped up near a fireworks stand on interstate 49 in Springdale. 
    In case you missed the recent dose of Fourth of July humor, in an effort to attract customers and provide a bit of holiday levity, Pinnacle Fireworks put up a sign advertising "gluten-free fireworks.” 
    The small company is owned by Adam Keeley and his father. "A lot of the people that come in want to crack a joke right along with you," Keeley said. "Every now and then, you will get someone that comes in and says so fireworks are supposed to be gluten-free right? Have I been buying fireworks that have gluten? So then I say no, no they are gluten-free. It's just a little fun."
    Keeley said that their stand saw a steady flow of customers in the week leading up to the Fourth. In addition to selling “gluten-free” fireworks, each fireworks package sold by Pinnacle features a QR code. The code can be scanned with a smartphone. The link leads to a video showing what the fireworks look like.
    We at Celiac.com hope you and your family had a safe, enjoyable, and, yes, gluten-free Fourth of July. Stay tuned for more on gluten-free fireworks and other zany, tongue-in-cheek stories.
    Read more at kark.com
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Stress-Related Disorders Associated with Higher Risk for Autoimmune Disease
    Celiac.com 08/13/2018 - It’s not uncommon for people to have psychiatric reactions to stressful life events, and these reactions may trigger some immune dysfunction. Researchers don’t yet know whether such reactions increase overall risk of autoimmune disease.
    Are psychiatric reactions induced by trauma or other life stressors associated with subsequent risk of autoimmune disease? Are stress-related disorders significantly associated with risk of subsequent autoimmune disease?
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether there is an association between stress-related disorders and subsequent autoimmune disease. The research team included Huan Song, MD, PhD; Fang Fang, MD, PhD; Gunnar Tomasson, MD, PhD; Filip K. Arnberg, PhD; David Mataix-Cols, PhD; Lorena Fernández de la Cruz, PhD; Catarina Almqvist, MD, PhD; Katja Fall, MD, PhD; Unnur A. Valdimarsdóttir, PhD.
    They are variously affiliated with the Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Centre for Rheumatology Research, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; the Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; the Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; the Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; the Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; and the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
    The team conducted a Swedish register-based retrospective cohort study that included 106, 464 patients with stress-related disorders, 1,064 ,640 matched unexposed individuals, and 126 ,652 full siblings to determine whether a clinical diagnosis of stress-related disorders was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease.
    The team identified stress-related disorder and autoimmune diseases using the National Patient Register. They used Cox model to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs of 41 autoimmune diseases beyond 1 year after the diagnosis of stress-related disorders, controlling for multiple risk factors.
    The data showed that being diagnosed with a stress-related disorder, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, acute stress reaction, adjustment disorder, and other stress reactions, was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease, compared with matched unexposed individuals. The team is calling for further studies to better understand the associations and the underlying factors.
    Source:
    JAMA. 2018;319(23):2388-2400. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.7028  

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-Free Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Breasts
    Celiac.com 08/11/2018 - Need a quick, easy, reliable gluten-free dish that will satisfy everyone and leave the cook with plenty of time to relax? This recipe is sure to do the trick. Best of all, it's super easy. Just grab some chicken breasts, season them, hit them with a sprig of rosemary, wrap some bacon around them, and chuck them on the grill and call it dinner. Okay, you can add some rice and veggies.
    Ingredients:
    4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves 4 thick slices bacon 4 teaspoons garlic powder 4 small sprigs fresh rosemary salt and pepper to taste Directions:
    Heat an outdoor grill to medium-high heat, and lightly oil the grate.
    Sprinkle 1 teaspoon garlic powder on a chicken breast and season with salt and pepper. 
    Place a rosemary sprig on each chicken breast. 
    Wrap the bacon around the chicken and the rosemary. 
    Hold bacon in place with a toothpick or extra rosemary stem.
    Cook the chicken breasts until no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, about 8 minutes per side. 
    Keep an eye out for any grill flare ups from the bacon grease. 
    Remove the toothpicks and serve with steamed rice and your favorite vegetables for a winning meal.

    Connie Sarros
    Five-Minute Healthy Breakfasts
    Celiac.com 08/10/2018 - You’ve heard for years that it’s wise to start your day with a healthy breakfast.  Eating food first thing in the morning gets your metabolism revved so you have energy throughout the day.  There’s also the issue of incorporating healthy foods into your first meal of the day.  Ideally, every meal should include fiber and foods from a variety of food groups.  But the reality is that most people don’t have time in the morning to create an involved meal.  You’re busy getting ready for work, packing the kids’ lunches and trying to get everyone out of the door on time.  
    Don’t fret.  The task of preparing a healthy breakfast just got easier.  You can make 5-minute breakfasts and, with a little bit of planning, you can sneak fiber into those meals without spending a lot of extra time with preparation.  An ideal breakfast will include whole grains (from gluten-free cereals, breads, muffins, or uncontaminated oats), a low-fat dairy item (1% milk, low-fat yogurt, or low-fat cheese), and a source of protein (such as peanut butter or eggs).  Adding fruit is a plus.  
    If you can tolerate uncontaminated oats, make a bowl of oatmeal and add a little extra fiber by stirring in chopped walnuts and dried cranberries.  If you like scrambled eggs, toss some fresh spinach (sliced into thin strips), 1 chopped canned artichoke heart, two tablespoons crumbled feta cheese, and a dash of Italian seasoning to the egg as it cooks.  
    If you have time on weekends to make healthy gluten-free pancakes (which  means that you added perhaps flax seed meal or shredded apples or something that qualifies as fiber to the batter), then freeze the pancakes between sheets of wax paper, place them in a freezer bag, and freeze so they’ll be handy on busy weekday mornings.  If you don’t have time to make them prior to need, you can always use commercial frozen gluten-free pancakes.  In a bowl, mix together a few raisins, half of a chopped pear or apple, a few dashes of cinnamon and a couple of tablespoons of chopped walnuts.  Spoon this mixture down the centers of two toasted (or microwaved) pancakes, drizzle each with 1 teaspoon of pancake or maple syrup, then fold in the sides of the pancakes to make two breakfast sandwiches.
    Brown rice is brown because the bran layer is still on the rice, and the bran layer is the part that’s so high in fiber.  White rice is much lower in fiber and has less nutritional value.  Brown rice isn’t just for dinner anymore.  It offers a nice breakfast alternative from traditional hot cereals.  The next time you make brown rice for dinner, make a little extra and save some for breakfast the next morning.  In the A.M., mix the rice (about 1 cup) with a few chopped pecans, a few raisins, 1/2 cup milk, 3 tablespoons pancake syrup, a dash each of vanilla and cinnamon, then microwave the mixture for 1 minute, stirring once after 30 seconds.  Let it sit for 30 seconds to thicken before eating.  Or stir together 1 cup cooked brown rice, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 navel orange diced, some chopped dates, dried cranberries, and shredded coconut; heat this in the microwave and then top it off with 1/2 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt.
    Just a note about using the microwave—it’s not an exact science.  Different ovens have different power levels so what cooks in 30 seconds in one person’s microwave may take 45 seconds in someone else’s unit.  Unless you want the food to splatter all over the sides of the oven, you’ll need to cover any liquids or soft foods with waxed paper.  
    There will be days when you don’t have time to sit down at the table and enjoy a leisurely breakfast.  On these days, make a “grab-and-go” breakfast that you can take with you.  Gluten-free wraps keep for several weeks in the refrigerator and they make great fill-and-go containers on busy mornings.  Spread a wrap with peanut butter, sprinkle some fortified gluten-free dry cereal on top, then drizzle with a teaspoon of pancake syrup; roll up the wrap and you have the perfect dashboard dining breakfast to eat on the way to work.  Or scramble an egg, spoon it down the center of the wrap, and then top it off with a little salsa and pepper-jack cheese before rolling it up. If you only have three minutes before you have to leave the house, spoon some low-fat cottage cheese into a cup, stir in a dash of cinnamon, top with a little low-fat gluten-free granola or fortified dry gluten-free cereal, sprinkle berries or chopped peaches over the top, grab a spoon, and you’re ready to go!
    Smoothies can be made in literally one minute.  Toss some frozen raspberries into a blender, add a 12-ounce container of low-fat lemon yogurt, a little milk, and two teaspoons of vanilla; blend, then pour the mixture into a large plastic cup.
    If you oversleep, don’t panic.  Have some back-up foods on hand that you can grab and eat en route to work, like a gluten-free protein bar and a banana, or a bag of nuts and dried fruit, or flax seed crackers with a handful of cheese cubes, or toss some gluten-free granola over a container of yogurt and grab a spoon to take along.
    All of the above suggestions can be made in five minutes or less.  Take the time to start your day off with a healthy breakfast—you deserve to do that for yourself and for your family.
    Apple English Muffins by Connie Sarros
    This recipe is from my newly-released book Student’s Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies.  While this isn’t a gluten-free cookbook, most of the recipes are naturally gluten-free or can very easily be converted to gluten-free.  
    Preparation time:  4 minutes.  Cooking time:  30 seconds.  Yield:  1 serving
    Ingredients:
    1 tablespoon peanut butter  1 gluten-free English muffin, toasted  1/8 large apple, peeled, cored and sliced thin ½ teaspoon butter  ¾ teaspoon brown sugar 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon Directions:
    Spread peanut butter on one toasted English muffin half.  Lay the apple slices on top. In a small microwave safe bowl, heat the butter in the microwave on high for 15 seconds.  Stir in the brown sugar and cinnamon then nuke for another 15 seconds.  Stir until smooth.  (If necessary, pop it back into the microwave until the brown sugar melts).   Drizzle the cinnamon mixture over the apple slices then place the second half of the English muffin on top. Note:  If you’re out of apples, use a pear, ripe peach or nectarine, mango, or even a banana.

    Jefferson Adams
    Can a New Gluten-Free Cricket-Flour Cookbook Turn Americans on to Eating Bugs?
    Celiac.com 08/09/2018 - Whatever one might say about crawfish, shrimp and crustaceans in general, Americans don’t typically eat bugs. Can a former Ralph Lauren marketing executive turn the world on to flour made from crickets?
    Over the last few years, Americans have been presented with a buffet of alternative proteins and meals. Robyn Shapiro’s company, Seek, has created all-purpose, gluten-free, and Paleo blended flours, which can be used cup for cup in any recipe calling for flour. 
    The company, which makes pure cricket powder for smoothies, ice creams, and other liquid-based foods, is now selling cinnamon-almond crunch cricket protein and snack bites. To get the public interested in its cricket protein and cricket flour products, Shapiro has collaborated with famous chefs to create recipes for The Cricket Cookbook. 
    The book’s cast includes La Newyorkina chef Fany Gerson, a Mexico City native known for her cricket sundaes; noted Sioux chef and cookbook author Sean Sherman; and former Noma pastry chef Ghetto Gastro member, Malcolm Livingston, among others.
    Other companies have sought to promote the benefits of insect protein, including Chapul, which makes cricket protein bars and powders, and Exo, which makes dairy- and gluten-free cricket protein bars in flavors like cocoa nut and banana bread. These companies, along with others in the business tend to aim their products at Paleo dieters by promising more protein and no dairy.
    Seek’s chef-focused approach makes it unique. By pairing with noted chefs who already use bugs and bug protein in their cooking, Shapiro is looking to make the public more comfortable and confident in using bugs to cook and bake. So far, the response has been slow, but steady. Seek has already raised nearly $13,000 from 28 backers, well on its way toward its $25,000 goal. 
    Seek’s cricket flours and other products will initially only be available via Kickstarter. If that goes well, the products will be sold on Seek’s website. Early backers will get a discount and a chance for a signed copy of the book. Seek hopes to debut their products nationwide starting in the fall. 
    Could gluten-free cricket flour and the new cookbook be the next big gluten-free Christmas gift? Stay tuned for more on this and other gluten-free stories.
    Source:
    grubstreet.com