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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    THE CALIFORNIA CIDER COMPANY MAKES ACE PREMIUM GLUTEN-FREE HARD CIDERS


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    The California Cider Company was founded in Graton, California in 1993.


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    Ace CiderThe ACE brands are ACE APPLE, ACE PERRY, ACE APPLE HONEY, ACE BERRY, ACE JOKER, ACE PUMPKIN, ACE PINEAPPLE, ACE BLACKJACK 21 and SPACE. The ciders range from the dry JOKER to the sweeter ACE BERRY and the champagne-like BLACKJACK 21 made with all local Sonoma apples. SPACE is a bloody orange mimosa at 6.9%abv. ACE Ciders are available in 46 states, go to acecider.com for more details.

    All our styles are all natural, all fruit and gluten-free and vegan. The ciders are unpasteurized but cold filtered 4 times so that they are fresh and clean to the taste. They are a lower calorie , lower alcohol alternative to wine and beer and very refreshing.

    The California Cider Company is the largest, independent, family owned cidery in the US, with we believe the best range of ciders for all tastes.

    Visit our site for more info: acecider.com.


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    Guest Cindy

    Posted

    Just bought Ace Pineapple Cider a few days ago before reading this article. I would highly recommend. It may be a bit sweet for some tastes but I prefer it over other brands of apple cider for sure (I have not tried any other flavors of Ace brand).

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    Guest Charlie Beau

    Posted

    The Ace Joker is the best stuff on earth for celiac sufferers and your small intestine will love you!

     

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  • Related Articles

    Kim Hopkins
    Celiac.com 06/24/2009 - If you are like the majority of people diagnosed with celiac disease, it probably took you many years of experiencing debilitating symptoms, talking to multiple doctors who gave you varied theories and diagnoses, thinking that you would never feel better…before you finally got it figured out.  Whether you had a positive experience with your health care professionals or not, hearing the diagnosis can lead to feeling lost and unsure of what to do next.  It can be quite overwhelming.  After all, food plays an important part in our culture – it’s how we share special moments together, celebrate, and nurture one another.  A big sense of loss can overcome someone when they hear that they can no longer eat wheat, barley, rye, and contaminated oats.  Some people say they go through the roller coaster of emotions similar to the grieving process.
    Can you make the necessary lifestyle adjustments to feel better and regain your health?  Absolutely!  Everyone’s pace is different and you need to give yourself time.  Is there a way that may help you to adjust a bit more quickly and with less frustration?  Yes:  consider hiring a personal coach that specializes in food challenges.
    What Is A Personal Coach?
    Coaching is a powerful, ongoing relationship which focuses on clients making important changes in their lives.  Coaching uses a process of inquiry and personal discovery to build a client’s level of awareness and responsibility, and provides the client with structure, support, and feedback.  The coaching process helps clients to both define and achieve personal and professional goals faster and with more ease than would be possible otherwise.   In coaching, the focus is on designing the future, not getting over the past.
    The field of coaching is booming and there are many coaching niche areas.  Business coaching for executives and teams has become quite popular.  Coaching children and teens to help them excel with academics is on the rise, as is parenting coaching.  Many small business owners higher coaches to help them increase revenue.
    Coaching usually occurs in the context of a long-term relationship, where the client’s goals, dreams, and vision drive the action.  The belief is that there are multiple paths to reach a goal, and that the client knows the way (though they might not realize it at the time).  The coach assists the client to become a “change master.”  To this end, coaching and adjustment to dietary changes go hand-in-hand.
    A Personal Coach Specializing In Dietary Restrictions Can Help You To:

    Learn the gluten-free lifestyle - Where to buy gluten-free food, product reviews, how to prepare gluten-free recipes, where to eat out, how to become a skilled label reader, understanding the safe & unsafe ingredient lists, decrease cross-contamination risk, how to set up your kitchen, where to find out if your cosmetics, hair care products, and medications are safe. Develop a support network - Website resources, how to get the most out of your primary care doctor, engaging a specialist such as a dietician or nutritionist. Vary your diet, taking into consideration essential nutrients. Adjust for the financial impact- Learn to live gluten-free on a budget. Brush up on your advocacy and education skills – Practice explaining celiac to friends, relatives, and coworkers, advocate to you/your child’s school, learn how to eat out safely, manage your anxiety. Monitor any ongoing symptoms and known associate health risks - Iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, fertility problems, leaky gut syndrome, candida, food sensitivities, other auto-immune disorders. Keep up on the latest research and what it may mean for you – there are many exciting studies happening that may have an impact on how you take care of yourself. Assist with other goals to help your life feel more balanced.
    How Does Coaching Work?
    Generally, most coaches have a structure that includes three to four sessions each month, with quick check-ins by phone and email in between.  Coaching sessions can be either one-on-one, in small groups, or a combination of both.  They can be in-person, via phone, or a combination of both throughout the month, which allows for financial and logistical flexibility.  In-person sessions can include shopping, practice with advocating, and cooking.A coach will encourage clients to set goals that they truly want, ask them to do more than they have done on their own, help them focus in order to produce results more quickly, and provide the tools, information, support, and structure to help them accomplish more.   It’s like having a personal trainer to assist you with making adjustments to improve your life.
    Who Should Consider Hiring A Coach?

    If you are feeling unsure as to how to adjust your lifestyle around your food challenges. If you are feeling limited by food allergies/intolerance/sensitivities. If you are not sure where to go for information or are overwhelmed by all the information you are finding. If you are restricting yourself from enjoying going out to restaurants, parties, etc. If you are having difficulty sticking to the gluten-free diet. It’s important to find someone that you “click” with.  Most coachesoffer a free initial session to help get to know them, and to answerany questions you might have about the coaching process.

    Kim Hopkins

    Plan your meals:  It sounds simple, but it’s one that is often ignored.  Sit down before you do your weekly grocery run.  Know what you are going to make for each meal including snacks.  Find out what’s on sale before you make your weekly meal plan.  Stick to the list when you shop! Develop a file of dependable, go to gluten-free recipes.  My people report that, when they are short on time, that’s when they are likely to make extravagant purchases.  Take the thinking and guess work out of meal planning by looking through your file.  You can even write down the estimated cost of the meal. Eat foods that are naturally gluten free found at the regular grocery store.  Corn tortillas are cheap and have many uses, including for sandwich wraps.  Beans are a nutrient-rich starch substitute, as are lentils. Eat whole foods.  Whether you are gluten-free or not, it is healthier not to eat packaged, processed foods.  Just because a product is marked gluten free doesn’t mean it’s good for you.  Processed gluten-free products often lack nutrients.  Limit these to a couple times per week or less. Eat foods that are in season.  This means they had to travel less far to reach your grocery store, therefore they will be cheaper. Grow your own.  Learn how to can and/or jar the extras.  Live in a cool climate?  Some veggies can be started inside. Make a soup.  Soups are filling, and they are a great way to use up items in the fridge. Eat more vegetarian and vegan meals.  Eliminating meat from two dinners per week will save you quite a bit of money. Eat breakfast for dinner.  Make a frittata – cook 3 strips of bacon in a skillet.  Set aside and drain off most of the fat.  Add diced onions.  Cook for 5 minutes.  Add diced red pepper.  Cook another 5 minutes.  Add a package of thawed, drained frozen spinach.  Salt and pepper to taste.  Add bacon back in.  Beat 5 eggs and pour them all over the filling.  Top with cheese and bake at 350 for 8 – 12 minutes, or until the eggs are set.  Serves 2 – 3. Get creative.  For thickening sauces or gravy, substitute equal amounts of cornstarch for flour.  Mashed potato flakes also make a great, inexpensive thickener and binder in place of breadcrumbs. Xanthan gum is used in many gluten-free recipes to serve as the “glue” to hold the product together; use 2 tsp. unflavored gelatin to replace 1tsp. xanthum gum in some recipes such as cookies. Cornmeal or crushed potato chips can be substituted when a recipe calls for a coating or crunchy topping. Buy in bulk.  Once you found something you like, save big by buying in a large quantity.  The Gluten-Free Mall  has bulk discounts and many other ways to save you money. See their "Shop Smart & Save Money!" section on the top-right corner of their site.
    Create or join a bulk buying group.  Ask around at your local support group, or link up with local folks online.  If you like the same products buy a bulk order and split it. Cook ahead and freeze meals in individual or family-size servings.  If you are not someone that cooks and you are watching your budget, it makes sense to learn. Invest in a good vacuum food sealer.  This will help keep leftovers fresh for longer = less waste. Bake 1-2 times per month.  Things like Pizza crusts, bread, and pie crusts will freeze well if wrapped properly. Make gluten-free cookie dough from scratch and freeze in a roll.  Cut and bake what you need.  This will curb your desire to buy an expensive mix. Start a gluten-free dinner swap (like a holiday cookie swap).  Get a few families to cook up a large quantity of gluten-free meals and swap them for variety! Join a food co-op.  Co-ops are groups who use their purchasing power to get lower prices. Make your own blend of gluten-free flours ahead of time and store in an air tight container. To prevent contamination, purchase extra appliances (like a toaster) from Craig’s List or Goodwill. Track your purchases.  Seeing it in black and white can be very revealing. Consult with your employer’s human resources department.  Do they offer a flexible spending account (FSA) benefit?  These accounts hold your money pre-tax for medical purchases.  If so, will the FSA recognize gluten free food (and related shipping charges)?  Get it in writing!  If your employer doesn’t offer this benefit, ask them to look into it.  This will save you about 30%. If you are not using an FSA and you spend a lot of money on medical expenses, consult with your accountant.  Are a portion of your gluten-free food purchases tax deductible?  Shipping charges often can be reimbursed from this account, as can mileage to and from specialty stores.

    Rick Lenger
    Celiac.com 10/12/2009 - It has been 9 months since my celiac diagnosis. It seems hard for me to believe that until January 23, 2009 I had never even heard of celiac disease. I have made up for lost time in the past few months. Hopefully, my story will help others who are newly diagnosed with celiac disease to hang on to hope and be encouraged that things are going to get better – much better as they move into a gluten free lifestyle. 
    In 1971 I had a panic attack. I have never been the same since that day. I won’t go into the details of it because most people know what a panic attack is like.  So I had a complete physical which included blood panels for the first time. When I got the results I found out I had an extremely elevated alkaline phosphatase level (400), normal is 80-130. My first thought was, “What the heck is alkaline phosphatase?”  The doctor was alarmed.  He ran more tests and suggested a liver biopsy.  He thought I might have liver cancer. No liver disease was found. From that panic attack until my celiac diagnosis I was always anxious about my liver. I also fought the fear of more panic attacks.   Nothing was ever conclusive. It just hung out there for over 35 years.  Every time I changed doctors and had my blood tested I went through the same series of tests and concerns. Nothing definitive was ever diagnosed.  Finally, my doctor told me my elevated counts were “normal for me.”
    Fast forward to the year 2003.  Without any reason I lost 20 lbs. over an 8 week period. I thought it was kind of cool to be “skinny”. I had always being kind of “doughy.” When I had a physical I found my alk-phos was now over 400.  I was anemic and more fatigued than ever.  My doctor wanted me to have a colonoscopy and an endoscopy. He said he was more worried about the anemia than the high alkaline phosphate. I had a colonoscopy, but refused the endoscopy on grounds that I couldn’t bear the thought of having a tube put down my esophagus.  What a mistake!  I could have gotten this diagnosis 6 years earlier.  The colonoscopy revealed no disease. When I did finally have an endoscopy in 2009 I was totally sedated and the test took about 4 minutes. It was the easiest test I’ve ever had.  My doctor thought I was depressed and put me on anti-depressants.  After adjusting to the meds I think I felt a little better, but deep down I knew something major was going on.  I figured if I were the President I would be sent to the Mayo Clinic for a couple of weeks and they would find out what was plaguing me. I thought my problem could be found only by the best doctors in the world and it would be at great expense – more than I could afford, so I decided to just live the best I could.
    Before my diagnosis I was not absorbing many, if any, nutrients.  At 6’2” I was a gaunt 156 lbs.  I had rapid heart beat, shortness of breath, fatigue, anemia, terrible muscle cramps all the intestinal issues known to man. Numerous blood counts were way off. The 98 lb. weakling at the beach could have kicked sand in my face all day long. My wife told me she couldn’t look at me anymore. It’s hard to look at someone who is suffering from serious malnutrition.  Everything I ate went right through me.  I didn’t think about it at the time, but as I reflect back on it I know I would have died by now if I hadn’t gotten off the gluten. Now I can see signs of celiac since childhood. I was delayed in reaching puberty until I was a junior in high school. I also had fears that we not reasonable.  There were some things going on neurologically for sure.

    I began feeling better within a few days after being diagnosed and going gluten free last January.  My weight began going up, and I just knew the anemia would go away and so would the high alk-phos.  6 weeks after diagnosis (March 2009) I went in for a blood test.  I was convinced the bloodwork would show normal levels in every category. I was proud and giddy.  I couldn’t wait to get the results.  Surprise, surprise!  The blood count for anemia had not changed and the alkaline phosphatase was over 600! What the heck was going on!  At least I felt better.
    I stumbled across a couple of articles on the internet about high alkaline phosphatase in celiacs and possible reasons.  Many celiacs have low calcium and vitamin D, and in some cases it causes high alk-phos.  Without getting too technical it seems that the alk-phos plays a role in bone growth and can go into overdrive when calcium and Vitamin D are extremely low. The solution for us may be in taking lots of calcium and Vitamin D supplements.  I know this is controversial, but I decided to go directly to the source of vitamin D (the Sun) for 15 minutes of sunlight each day.  I also have been taking a great gluten free calcium/magnesium supplement for the past 6 months.  Last week I went in for more bloodwork.  I know I continue to feel better all of the time, but after my last blood work I’m a little nervous about the actual results.  The nurse called me the day after the blood was drawn and told me my count for anemia is now in the low normal range and the alkaline phosphatase is 300!  It had dropped 300 points in 6 months.  I think I’m on to something.  I feel like I’m on the right track and will continue the supplements. I haven’t mentioned how low my cholesterol was in January.  The LDL was 33 and the HDL was 18.  The total cholesterol was 61. The doctor said it was the lowest cholesterol he had ever seen! Now it has gone up to a total of 140!  Something is definitely working!  I think just being gluten free for 9 months has been better than anything else, but I continue to be hopeful about the calcium and vitamin D supplements.
     I have gained 50 healthy lbs. since discovering I’m a full blown, card carrying celiac. I’m working out every other day with weights and I figure of the 50 extra lbs. about 25 of it is muscle and the rest is fat.  Oh well.  I do look better.  My wife can look at me again and I can even look at myself once in a while. I had no idea what it was like to feel normal.  Good things can be found through every struggle. Were it not for these trials I would not have found my faith and learned to trust God. I wouldn’t change that for anything. Everything happens for a reason. I do wonder what I may have done with my life had I been gluten free from birth.  I don’t spend too much time thinking about it, though, since I can do nothing to change it. I consider it miraculous that I could have been in education as a teacher and administrator for 32 years before I hit the wall in 2005.   I’m 60 years old now.  I really look forward to the future. I feel like my best years are ahead of me.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/10/2011 - Like a lot of people, Lenord Dorr loves beer.  In fact, Lenord Dorr loves beer so much, he opened his own homebrew store. Unlike most people, though, who love beer and open beer-brewing shops, Lenord Dorr also has celiac disease.
    Now, in general, loving beer and brewing beer does not jibe well with having celiac disease, since people with celiac disease have bad reactions to the wheat, and barley so central to the brewing process.
    For Dorr, however, celiac disease and the love of beer and brewing is driving spark behind his own homebrew store.
    "In 2001, I got sick with celiac, and gluten-free beers were just not available," said Dorr. "So I started brewing my own beers."
    Ultimately, Dorr said, brewing gluten-free beers became a passion that "grew into my own business."
    Dorr's shop offers the beginners through the professional brewer a complete range of ingredients and equipment for making wine or beer. Everything from Colorado grains, specialty sugars, malt extracts, and the equipment needed to magically turn those ingredients into a favorite brew.
    Of course, Dorr offers plenty of ingredients to make gluten-free beers.
    "There are more brewers than I thought," Dorr said. "There are a lot out there and many more who want to be."
    Dorr and his wife, Rebecca, opened the doors to the Homebrew Connection just after Thanksgiving, and they have since sold 14 new beer-brewing kits.
    "We'll have 14 new brewers after Christmas. That's exciting," Dorr said.
    The Homebrew Connection is located just off Main Street at 20 S. Nevada Avenue in Montrose, Colorado. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.
    Link: www.thehomebrewconnection.com


  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com