• Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    This article is a paid advertising spot for this Web site. For more information about our advertising programs, including how you can see your ad on this site, please visit our advertising page.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   8 Members, 0 Anonymous, 420 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 06/10/2010 - New research is currently underway in Ireland, as researchers test "pseudo-cereals" to determine the quality of  replacements for glutenous grains such as, wheat, rye and barley. Many celiacs, especially those with delayed diagnosis', suffer from malabsorbtion and malnutrition. It is therefore more important for celiacs to ingest grains that are vitamin fortified than it is for non-celiacs. Researchers at Teagasc Food Research Ashtown are attempting to address the nutritional concerns for gluten-free products. They are working to  formulate gluten-free bread products that are tasty, and have higher nutritional properties.
    Doctor Eimear Gallagher, of Teagasc Food Research Ashtown, is leading the current research project which primarily focuses on using “pseudo-cereals” such as amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat, to replace gluten containing grains,  also known as wheat, rye and barley. Dr. Gallagher suggests that the demand for new and improved gluten-free bread products is growing  rapidly due to greater public awareness of celiac disease, and the rise in positive celiac diagnoses'.
    Celiac affects approximately 1 percent of the population. Which means that 1 percent of the population must look for alternatives to favored grain products such as bread, pizza and cereals to name a few. While there is a large variety of gluten-free products on the market, many gluten-free products are described as being crumbly, brittle, bland and often rendered  inedible. Gluten-free products are not only considered inferior in texture and taste to their wheat counterparts, but they are also criticized for having inferior nutritional value. Most mainstream breads and grains are vitamin fortified and therefore contain many essential nutrients, vitamins, and fiber. However, most gluten-free grains are typically made with starches and refined flours such as rice, corn and potato starches, which are low in nutrients and are not usually fortified.
    Dr. Gallagher and researchers are studying characteristics of pseudo-cereals to replace wheat in grain products. Amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat are naturally high in nutritional values with high levels of protein and dietary fiber, which make them excellent grain alternatives  for celiacs. Dr. Gallagher's findings showed that all of the pseudo-cereal breads revealed a significant increase in antioxidant and polyphenol activity, compared to the gluten-free control group.
    Teagasc  food researchers are also working hard to create a dairy-based ingredient that can produce the same properties in bread as gluten does. So far researchers have discovered that casein aggregates and forms a protein network which can retain gas in gluten-free dough. The reactions are similar to gluten containing wheat dough, but this is a work in progress and more studies are needed.
    Dr. Gallagher's studies have revealed significant information on ingredients, formulations and technologies used to make gluten-free products, which will help provide edible and healthy alternatives to gluten-free products.
    Source:

    ScienceDaily (May 26, 2010)

    Advertising Product-Review
    I've now been gluten-free for over 20 years, yet I've never broken down and purchased a bread machine, nor have I ever used one. It should go without saying that I am also eating very mediocre gluten-free bread.
    Recently I was given the opportunity to review Panasonic's new SD-YR2500 Automatic Gluten-Free Bread Maker. This is the first bread maker made by Panasonic specifically for making gluten-free breads. Needless to say, I was very excited to finally get to test out this machine and discover why they are so popular among those who are on a gluten-free diet.
    The machine arrived undamaged, which was no surprise given how well it was packaged—it was double boxed, and the inside display box included molded Styrofoam that protected the machine very well. It took only a few minutes to unpack and set it up.
    My next step was selecting a recipe to use—I went with one that has been on Celiac.com for many years, and is highly rated. I decided to substitute the different flours used in the recipe with Bob's Red Mill 1-1 Baking Flour, as I didn't have the many different flours listed in the original recipe. Basically I used a highly modified version of a recipe that I've never tried before, and made it in a bread machine that I've never used before—how well could this possibly turn out, right?
    I hope you are surprised to learn that, all things considered, it was easily the best gluten-free bread I've ever made, and was light years beyond the packaged stuff I've been eating for years (the company shall remain nameless, but you're probably eating it too!). I think the scientific control that the bread machine offers, for example, the timed mixing and kneading processes, the long rising time and the perfectly even baking temperature help make even a total amateur baker like myself look like a professional.
    My experience with this gluten-free bread machine left me with confidence and the feeling that I can easily improve on an already improvised recipe, and have fun experimenting with different versions of it (I'm going for a rosemary loaf next time!). Overall Panasonic's SD-YR2500 was very easy to use, and the nice thing about this bread machine is that it will do all of the hard work for you. Just add the ingredients select the ideal setting and turn it on. You'll never get sore kneading bread by hand again.
    My first experience with Panasonic's SD-YR2500 was an excellent one, and it made me wonder: Why have I waited so long for excellent gluten-free bread?
    For more info visit their site.

    Maria Lerario
    Celiac.com 11/17/2015 - For most people, when they think of gluten, the first thing that comes to mind is bread. And for most people with celiac or a gluten sensitivity, that is what we miss most.
    While people with celiac or gluten sensitivity may never be able to experience the wide selection or soft texture that "glutenous" bread offers, there are still some tasty gluten-free bread options available at most grocery stores. In order to find the best gluten-free bread options, I went to my local Giant Eagle and tried all of the gluten-free bread available and explored four main aspects: taste, texture, price, and variety.
    The three brands of gluten-free bread offered at Giant Eagle were Schar, Udi's, and Goodbye Gluten.
    In the variety category, Udi's offered the largest selection of bread with the choice of white bread, multigrain bread, cinnamon raisin bread, and millet-chia bread and omega flax and fiber bread. Udi's also offers a large variety of other products ranging from muffins and cookies, to pizza crusts and tortillas.
    While Udi's may have the largest variety of the three brands, Schar offered a few different kinds of bread as well, with a cinnamon raisin and multigrain option along with an assortment of rolls.
    In the category of price, Goodbye Gluten came in as the most inexpensive per ounce at $0.27 per ounce. Udi's was in the middle $0.37 per oz. and Schar was the most expensive of the three, coming in at $0.40 per oz.
    Now let's get down to business. Taste and texture—the two aspects that are hardest to get right when making gluten-free bread. In my opinion, Udi's won both categories with the tastiness, most normal textured bread. My only critique was the slices of bread weren't big enough! All three brands seemed to have their slices of bread on the smaller side, but Udi's bread seemed to be especially small.
    Although Udi's took the first prize in three of the four categories, that is not to say the other two brands were not good. I was impressed with all three brands, but my main critique covers the texture category.
    The Goodbye Gluten bread seemed to be very dense, and while most gluten-free bread crumbles more than normal, I felt that the Goodbye Gluten loaf broke easier than the other two. However, it was very moist, something that is hard to come by in gluten-free bread.
    With the Schar bread, I felt that it was a little dry and grainy rather than moist and chewy like normal gluten filled bread. However, I found that when I toasted the bread, it had a texture more consistent with normal toast.
    Overall, I was satisfied with all three brands, but Udi's was the favorite. With the texture and taste being spot on, I did not need much else to convince me, but the added bonus of the reasonable price and large variety made it the most desirable gluten-free bread available.

    Advertising Product-Review
    GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX (see Sources below).
    GliadinX does not prevent and is not a cure for celiac disease, however, extensive scientific research has been conducted at multiple medical centers which has shown that it effectively breaks down gliadin into small, harmless fragments before it can reach the small intestine. GliadinX is perfect for celiacs who still want to eat outside of their home, and not have to worry about cross-contamination, and for those who are gluten sensitive and wish to continue eating gluten.
    Many people have asked Celiac.com how they can order this product, so we've included a "Buy Now" link below to order them directly from the manufacturer:

     
    Sources: Scientific publications on AN-PEP enzymes:
    Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.