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    The Gluten-Free Mall


    Celiac.com Sponsor: Banner
    • Only the best. Only gluten free.

    The Gluten-Free Mall

    At Gluten Free Mall, this is our promise to you and we strive to achieve it every day!

    One of the first to recognize the need for easy and convenient access to gluten free foods, Gluten Free Mall has been providing delicious, high-quality solutions since 1998. We specialize in offering new and unique items that you might not find at your local market or grocery, and are one of the only online retailers offering frozen shipping right to your door! With literally hundreds of brands and items to choose from, you'll find everything from handy baking mixes to frozen meals, tasty snacks to wholesome cereals – we even carry select vitamins, personal care items, and household cleaners. Best of all, it's all guaranteed gluten free!

    From our extensive product selection and friendly customer service to our fast and convenient shipping, Gluten Free Mall is dedicated to providing our customers with the best online shopping experience in gluten free foods. So stop by today and shop awhile!

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  • Related Articles

    Destiny Stone
    Irish Study of Gluten-Free Foods
    Celiac.com 06/10/2010 - New research is currently underway in Ireland, as researchers test "pseudo-cereals" to determine the quality of  replacements for glutenous grains such as, wheat, rye and barley. Many celiacs, especially those with delayed diagnosis', suffer from malabsorbtion and malnutrition. It is therefore more important for celiacs to ingest grains that are vitamin fortified than it is for non-celiacs. Researchers at Teagasc Food Research Ashtown are attempting to address the nutritional concerns for gluten-free products. They are working to  formulate gluten-free bread products that are tasty, and have higher nutritional properties.
    Doctor Eimear Gallagher, of Teagasc Food Research Ashtown, is leading the current research project which primarily focuses on using “pseudo-cereals” such as amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat, to replace gluten containing grains,  also known as wheat, rye and barley. Dr. Gallagher suggests that the demand for new and improved gluten-free bread products is growing  rapidly due to greater public awareness of celiac disease, and the rise in positive celiac diagnoses'.
    Celiac affects approximately 1 percent of the population. Which means that 1 percent of the population must look for alternatives to favored grain products such as bread, pizza and cereals to name a few. While there is a large variety of gluten-free products on the market, many gluten-free products are described as being crumbly, brittle, bland and often rendered  inedible. Gluten-free products are not only considered inferior in texture and taste to their wheat counterparts, but they are also criticized for having inferior nutritional value. Most mainstream breads and grains are vitamin fortified and therefore contain many essential nutrients, vitamins, and fiber. However, most gluten-free grains are typically made with starches and refined flours such as rice, corn and potato starches, which are low in nutrients and are not usually fortified.
    Dr. Gallagher and researchers are studying characteristics of pseudo-cereals to replace wheat in grain products. Amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat are naturally high in nutritional values with high levels of protein and dietary fiber, which make them excellent grain alternatives  for celiacs. Dr. Gallagher's findings showed that all of the pseudo-cereal breads revealed a significant increase in antioxidant and polyphenol activity, compared to the gluten-free control group.
    Teagasc  food researchers are also working hard to create a dairy-based ingredient that can produce the same properties in bread as gluten does. So far researchers have discovered that casein aggregates and forms a protein network which can retain gas in gluten-free dough. The reactions are similar to gluten containing wheat dough, but this is a work in progress and more studies are needed.
    Dr. Gallagher's studies have revealed significant information on ingredients, formulations and technologies used to make gluten-free products, which will help provide edible and healthy alternatives to gluten-free products.
    Source:

    ScienceDaily (May 26, 2010)

    Celiac.com Sponsor: Review
    Panasonic SD-YR2500 Automatic Gluten-Free Bread Maker Review
    I've now been gluten-free for over 20 years, yet I've never broken down and purchased a bread machine, nor have I ever used one. It should go without saying that I am also eating very mediocre gluten-free bread.
    Recently I was given the opportunity to review Panasonic's new SD-YR2500 Automatic Gluten-Free Bread Maker. This is the first bread maker made by Panasonic specifically for making gluten-free breads. Needless to say, I was very excited to finally get to test out this machine and discover why they are so popular among those who are on a gluten-free diet.
    The machine arrived undamaged, which was no surprise given how well it was packaged—it was double boxed, and the inside display box included molded Styrofoam that protected the machine very well. It took only a few minutes to unpack and set it up.
    My next step was selecting a recipe to use—I went with one that has been on Celiac.com for many years, and is highly rated. I decided to substitute the different flours used in the recipe with Bob's Red Mill 1-1 Baking Flour, as I didn't have the many different flours listed in the original recipe. Basically I used a highly modified version of a recipe that I've never tried before, and made it in a bread machine that I've never used before—how well could this possibly turn out, right?
    I hope you are surprised to learn that, all things considered, it was easily the best gluten-free bread I've ever made, and was light years beyond the packaged stuff I've been eating for years (the company shall remain nameless, but you're probably eating it too!). I think the scientific control that the bread machine offers, for example, the timed mixing and kneading processes, the long rising time and the perfectly even baking temperature help make even a total amateur baker like myself look like a professional.
    My experience with this gluten-free bread machine left me with confidence and the feeling that I can easily improve on an already improvised recipe, and have fun experimenting with different versions of it (I'm going for a rosemary loaf next time!). Overall Panasonic's SD-YR2500 was very easy to use, and the nice thing about this bread machine is that it will do all of the hard work for you. Just add the ingredients select the ideal setting and turn it on. You'll never get sore kneading bread by hand again.
    My first experience with Panasonic's SD-YR2500 was an excellent one, and it made me wonder: Why have I waited so long for excellent gluten-free bread?
    For more info visit their site.

    Maria Lerario
    Gluten-Free Grocery Store Bread Reviewed
    Celiac.com 11/17/2015 - For most people, when they think of gluten, the first thing that comes to mind is bread. And for most people with celiac or a gluten sensitivity, that is what we miss most.
    While people with celiac or gluten sensitivity may never be able to experience the wide selection or soft texture that "glutenous" bread offers, there are still some tasty gluten-free bread options available at most grocery stores. In order to find the best gluten-free bread options, I went to my local Giant Eagle and tried all of the gluten-free bread available and explored four main aspects: taste, texture, price, and variety.
    The three brands of gluten-free bread offered at Giant Eagle were Schar, Udi's, and Goodbye Gluten.
    In the variety category, Udi's offered the largest selection of bread with the choice of white bread, multigrain bread, cinnamon raisin bread, and millet-chia bread and omega flax and fiber bread. Udi's also offers a large variety of other products ranging from muffins and cookies, to pizza crusts and tortillas.
    While Udi's may have the largest variety of the three brands, Schar offered a few different kinds of bread as well, with a cinnamon raisin and multigrain option along with an assortment of rolls.
    In the category of price, Goodbye Gluten came in as the most inexpensive per ounce at $0.27 per ounce. Udi's was in the middle $0.37 per oz. and Schar was the most expensive of the three, coming in at $0.40 per oz.
    Now let's get down to business. Taste and texture—the two aspects that are hardest to get right when making gluten-free bread. In my opinion, Udi's won both categories with the tastiness, most normal textured bread. My only critique was the slices of bread weren't big enough! All three brands seemed to have their slices of bread on the smaller side, but Udi's bread seemed to be especially small.
    Although Udi's took the first prize in three of the four categories, that is not to say the other two brands were not good. I was impressed with all three brands, but my main critique covers the texture category.
    The Goodbye Gluten bread seemed to be very dense, and while most gluten-free bread crumbles more than normal, I felt that the Goodbye Gluten loaf broke easier than the other two. However, it was very moist, something that is hard to come by in gluten-free bread.
    With the Schar bread, I felt that it was a little dry and grainy rather than moist and chewy like normal gluten filled bread. However, I found that when I toasted the bread, it had a texture more consistent with normal toast.
    Overall, I was satisfied with all three brands, but Udi's was the favorite. With the texture and taste being spot on, I did not need much else to convince me, but the added bonus of the reasonable price and large variety made it the most desirable gluten-free bread available.

    Celiac.com Sponsor: Review
    GliadinX AN-PEP Enzymes Break Down Gluten in the Gut - A Product Review
    GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX (see Sources below).
    GliadinX does not prevent and is not a cure for celiac disease, however, extensive scientific research has been conducted at multiple medical centers which has shown that it effectively breaks down gliadin into small, harmless fragments before it can reach the small intestine. GliadinX is perfect for celiacs who still want to eat outside of their home, and not have to worry about cross-contamination, and for those who are gluten sensitive and wish to continue eating gluten.
    The quote below was made by Dr. Stefano Guandalini, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center-Comer Children’s Hospital, Chicago, IL, and was published in Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755:
    "12. Treatment of the Extra-Intestinal Manifestations of CD
    the only one that is currently on the market is the gluten-specific enzyme, GliadinX (AN-PEP). Unfortunately, it is only capable of detoxifying 0.2 g of gluten or roughly that of 1/8 of a slice of gluten-containing bread. For this reason, it should only be used as an adjunct to the GFD when there are concerns for accidental gluten contamination and in an effort to ameliorate symptoms, not as a replacement for the GFD."
    Many people have asked Celiac.com how they can order this product, so we've included a "Buy Now" link below to order them directly from the manufacturer:

     
    Sources: Scientific publications on AN-PEP enzymes:
    Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase

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