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    • Scott Adams

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    Buckwheat Flour Makes Healthier, Better Tasting Gluten-free bread


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 09/28/2010 - Buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads taste better than regular gluten-free breads, and have properties that may benefit people with celiac disease, according to a new study.


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    Moreover, buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free flour could be used to create high quality, antioxidant rich bread products that benefit people with celiac disease and offer new market possibilities, says the team behind the study, M. Wronkowska, D. Zielinska, D. Szawara-Nowak, A. Troszynska, and leader M. Soral-Smietana of the Polish Academy of Sciences.

    Soral-Smietana notes that buckwheat's mineral content and antioxidant activity make it ideal for new buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads. Buckwheat flour contains high-quality proteins, and is rich in antioxidants and minerals such as, flavonoids, phenolic acids, B vitamins , and carotenoids. Because of these properties, Buckwheat has recently caught the attention of food scientists.

    In their study, the research team found that enriching gluten-free flour with 40 per cent buckwheat flour creates gluten-free bread “with more functional components and higher anti-oxidative and reducing capacities,” in addition to offering health benefits to people with celiac disease.

    To produce their buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads for the study, the team replaced between ten and 40 per cent of corn starch with flour made from common buckwheat Fagopyrum esculentum Moench. Corn starch is a common ingredient in gluten-free breads.

    They found that gluten-free bread enhanced with 40 per cent buckwheat flour had the highest antioxidant capacity and reducing capacity, and this was positively correlated with their total phenolic contents. The 40 per cent enhanced bread also demonstrated the highest overall sensory quality when compared to a gluten-free bread control.

    The team found that higher buckwheat concentrations made for higher levels of magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. From their results, they concluded that gluten-free bread formulated with 40 per cent buckwheat flour could be developed and dedicated to those people suffering from celiac disease. In addition to being healthier than current gluten-free breads, such bread would also likely taste better, because the “…overall sensory quality of buckwheat enhanced breads was significantly higher than that obtained for gluten-free bread.”

    Source:


    Image Caption: According to a new study, buckwheat flour makes healthier bread
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    Guest Donnie

    Posted

    I can't eat any of the gluten free breads or other baked goods that are on the market. I'm severely allergic to corn, and to the sulfites that are used to bleach or process food starches. It would be ideal if some companies would produce a least some products that could be eaten by people who need to avoid corn and sulfites, as well as gluten. I really like buckwheat, and eat it quite often.

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    Great to see the professionals confirming what I have felt about buckwheat since I started cooking gluten free a year ago! I saw a comparison of most gluten free flours and picked buckwheat and quinoa as being more nutritious than usual rice, tapioca and cornflour mixes. Has any similar study been done on Quinoa? Would be interested to see how that compares with buckwheat. I regularly use quinoa, dessicated coconut and ground linseed instead of plain rice flour as they both provide more fiber to keep things moving.

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    Buckwheat is my favorite flour. I use it often in exchange for other gluten free flours. It is divine in waffles and pancakes.

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    Guest Becky

    Posted

    Buckwheat is great...I discovered it in 1994 in the USA and have been a fan ever since. It tastes great and it has that sticky quality that is needed in bread. Great to see that the experts have found it too! I hope it becomes more popular and available from now on.

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    Guest Dolores Mita

    Posted

    Do you have a recipe for bread made with Buckwheat flour? Do you know which companies make a buckwheat bread?

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    Guest fionnuala

    Posted

    I can't eat any of the gluten free breads or other baked goods that are on the market. I'm severely allergic to corn, and to the sulfites that are used to bleach or process food starches. It would be ideal if some companies would produce a least some products that could be eaten by people who need to avoid corn and sulfites, as well as gluten. I really like buckwheat, and eat it quite often.

    Hi I realize this response is two years after submitted article on buckwheat, but I just found it now. I am new to gluten free baking and struggle with quantities for buckwheat, like in pancake mixture , what do you mix it with. Love to know more.

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    Hi I realize this response is two years after submitted article on buckwheat, but I just found it now. I am new to gluten free baking and struggle with quantities for buckwheat, like in pancake mixture , what do you mix it with. Love to know more.

    I love buckwheat pancakes and make them every Sunday. I use 100% buckwheat flour, a couple of eggs and mix in water until the desired consistency is reached. It is best to hand mix with a whisk. I do this the night before, and then let the batter sit in the refrigerator for 12 hours (seems to make a better pancake). I use coconut oil on a non-stick skillet, Pour a ladle full onto the skillet, let it cook almost all the way through. (this is the trick most people don't know, as soon as the pancake is cooked all the way through it will hold together, if it is not ready to be flipped it will fall apart and make a huge mess). I usually mix up some toppings, whether it be slightly stir fried apples with some berries, or even an egg over easy with stir fried veggies if you are trying to avoid sugar.

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    Do you have a good recipe for me to use to make buckwheat bread and rolls?

     

    My husband developed an allergy to wheat, soy and peanuts. I appreciate your help. Thanks.

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams

    The following was written by Donald D. Kasarda who is a research chemist in the Crop Improvement and Utilization Research Unit of the United States Department of Agriculture. If you have any questions or comments regarding the piece, you can address them to Don at: kasarda@pw.usda.gov.
    Most sprouted wheat still has gluten or gluten peptides remaining. Although the sprouting begins enzymatic action that starts to break down the gluten (a storage protein for the plant) into peptides and even amino acids. Generally this is not a complete process for sprouts used in foods so some active peptides (active in celiac disease) remain.

    Wendy Cohan
    Celiac.com 10/02/2008 - Whole grains are good sources of B-Vitamins and minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and selenium, but one of their most important nutritional benefits is the fiber they bring to our diets.  Whole grains such as wheat, brown rice, and oats include both soluble and insoluble fiber.  Soluble fiber is easy to remember – it is water soluble, and as such can be assimilated into the body, where it plays an important role in blood sugar regulation and cholesterol balance.   Soluble fiber also helps provide a sense of fullness or satiety.  Insoluble fiber is - you guessed it - insoluble in water, and is not assimilated into the body, but passes through the digestive tract and is eliminated.  That does not mean insoluble fiber has a less important nutritional role to play.  Insoluble fiber is very important in keeping our digestive and elimination systems regular.  Fiber aids the transit of toxic substances out of the body, and in doing so, helps to reduce the incidence of colon and rectal cancers.
    In eliminating gluten grains from your diet, have you wondered what you are missing nutritionally?  Are you able to get adequate replacements for the nutrients in wheat, barley, rye, and oats, from the other nutritional components of your diet?  The answer is a qualified yes.  We know this on several levels.  For tens of thousands of years, entire cultures have thrived without growing or consuming any of the gluten grains.  We also know, from looking at what nutrients gluten grains provide, that there are more than adequate sources of these nutrients in alternative grains, and from vegetable sources.  Fiber is something we do need to be aware of, though.  Studies have shown that standard gluten-free diets are low in fiber, especially when baking with the “white” alternative products like white or sweet rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch.  We can remedy this by eating alternative grains in whole, unprocessed states, and by including nuts, seeds, and other sources of fiber such as dried coconut and legumes in our diets.  Wheat is an excellent source of Vitamin E, so those on gluten-free diets might want to supplement with a good brand of Vitamin E.
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    See the chart attached to this article (the link to it is in the "Attachments" section below) for the nutrient content of the many gluten-free alternative grains, starches, and nut flours.  The highest levels of nutrients in each category are noted, and you can see what nutritional powerhouses grains like teff, quinoa, sorghum, and amaranth are compared to white rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch.  


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/30/2010 - Presently, the only proven treatment for celiac disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet. As part of a gluten-free diet, people with celiac disease are encouraged to avoid consuming foods containing rye, along with avoiding wheat and barley.
    However, there is surprisingly little evidence to document the adverse effects of rye in cases of celiac disease. To address this deficiency, a team of clinicians set out to determine conclusively whether rye should be excluded from the celiac diet.
    The team included S. M. Stenman, K. Lindfors, J. I. Venäläinen,  A. Hautala, P. T. Männistö,  J. A. Garcia-Horsman,  A. Kaukovirta-Norja, S. Auriola, T. Mauriala, M. Mäki, and K. Kaukinen
    They are affiliated variously with the Department of Pediatrics, and the Pediatric Research Center of the Medical School University of Tampere, the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery at Tampere University Hospital, the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of Kuopio, the Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, the Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of Helsinki, and Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    The goal of the team was to determine whether rye secalin triggers toxic reactions in vitro in intestinal epithelial cell models to the same degree as wheat gliadin.
    Moreover, they examined whether the harmful effects of secalin can be reduced by germinating cereal enzymes from oat, wheat and barley to hydrolyze secalin into short fragments as a pretreatment.
    The data showed that secalin did trigger toxic reactions in intestinal Caco-2 epithelial cells in a similar manner to gliadin. Secalin triggered epithelial cell layer permeability, tight junctional protein occludin and ZO-1 distortion, and actin reorganization.
    High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS), showed that germinating barley enzymes best degraded the secalin and gliadin peptides. Further in vitro analysis showed that germinating barley enzyme pretreatment ameliorated all toxic secalin-triggered reactions.
    From these results, the team concludes that germinating enzymes from barley offer efficient degradation of rye secalin.
    In future, these enzymes might be utilized as a novel medical treatment for celiac disease or in food processing in order to develop high-quality celiac-safe food products.
    Such enzyme treatments might pave the way for either new treatments for celiac disease, or, new methods of processing rye for production of new, celiac-safe foods.

    SOURCE: Clinical & Experimental Immunology DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2010.04119.x


  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.
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    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
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    Itchy Rash
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    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com