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  • Jen Cafferty
    Jen Cafferty

    Quinoa the Amazing Gluten-Free Grain

    Celiac.com 05/29/2009 - Quinoa is making a comeback as a "wonder grain." Before going gluten free, most people have never heard of quinoa. But, once you embrace the gluten-free lifestyle, you should learn more about this amazing grain.

    Quinoa is an ancient grain that has been grown in South America for thousands of years and was called the "gold of the Incas." The grain resembles millet and has a bitter protective saponin coating that protects the grain from being eaten by birds and insects.

    Today, many companies that sell quinoa in the United States remove the bitter saponins. This allows you to prepare the quinoa without having to rinse it first.

    Red Quinoa - A Gluten-Free GrainQuinoa is gluten-free, high in fiber and a complete protein, meaning it has all nine amino acids. Quinoa also contains high amounts of lysine, manganese, magnesium, iron, copper and phosphorus. Due to quinoa being a complete protein, it is an excellent food choice for the gluten-free vegan.

    To prepare the quinoa for cooking, either purchase pre-rinsed quinoa or rinse the quinoa in a strainer until the saponins are removed. To cook the quinoa, add one part of the grain to two parts liquid in a saucepan. After the mixture is brought to a boil, reduce the heat to simmer and cover. One cup of quinoa cooked in this method usually takes 15 minutes to prepare. When cooking is complete, you will notice that the grains have become translucent, and the white germ has partially detached itself, appearing like a white-spiraled tail.

    Serve quinoa as a replacement for rice or couscous. Quinoa is delicious served cold or warm and can be frozen and reheated. It is recommended to prepare the entire box of quinoa and freeze the unused portions for later use.

    Tuscan Quinoa Salad Recipe

    Ingredients
    2 cups cooked quinoa
    ¼ cup scallions, chopped
    2 cloves garlic,minced
    1 box cherry tomatoes, sliced in half
    ½ cup pine nuts, toasted
    ½ cup fresh parsley, chopped
    ½ cup fresh basil, chopped
    3 T olive oil
    juice from half of a lemon
    kosher salt and pepper to taste

    To Prepare
    Prepare quinoa according to recipe on package. Add remaining ingredients to quinoa. Season with salt and pepper to your liking. You may replace oil and lemon juice with Italian dressing. 


    Sources for info on quinoa:
    Quinoa Corporation
    Eden Organics
    Homegrown Harvest



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    Very interesting article and I will certainly try some quinoa. Just one thing, Ms Cafferty suggests using it instead of rice or couscous, but I thought couscous contains gluten. Am I mistaken?

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    There are at least a few people (including myself) who react strongly to Quinoa - it makes me horribly ill. Just lucky in my intolerances, I guess - it's showing up in a lot of packaged gluten-free food now, hopefully it will continue to be well-marked in ingredients.

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    There are at least a few people (including myself) who react strongly to Quinoa - it makes me horribly ill. Just lucky in my intolerances, I guess - it's showing up in a lot of packaged gluten-free food now, hopefully it will continue to be well-marked in ingredients.

    Thank you for your comment. I too cannot digest Quinoa. I just tried it for the 3rd time and within 3 hours had extreme nausea, sweating and diarrhea. I did not rinse the quinoa before cooking it and wonder if that would have made any difference. I am leery to try it again to find out.

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    Thank you for your comment. I too cannot digest Quinoa. I just tried it for the 3rd time and within 3 hours had extreme nausea, sweating and diarrhea. I did not rinse the quinoa before cooking it and wonder if that would have made any difference. I am leery to try it again to find out.

    Please note that Quinoa is gluten-free unless it is cross contaminated in the field or processing plant. Quinoa grown in South America is almost never cross-contaminated.

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    One caveat is that most Quinoa products are a combination of quinoa and CORN. Chances are, if you have a gluten allergy, you may very likely have a corn allergy. I had a similarly bad reaction to eating Quinoa pasta because it had corn in it (I didn't read the package carefully enough). So far, I haven't found any quinoa without corn.

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    Great information on a grain I've heard of but hesitated to use simply because I'm not familiar with it.

    It's delicious, I've just started going Gluten-free as my mom has celiac sprue. Try preparing the quinoa as box directed, but replace the water with equal parts water and milk. Then add a few handfuls of your favorites: walnuts, dried cranberries, frozen blueberries or strawberries, pecans, bananas, etc. then add 2 tsp vanilla extract and 2 tsp. cinnamon and a dash or two of nutmeg if you'd like. You can add flaxseed or anything else you'd like to make it more nutrient-rich, if that's even possible! I love this nutty cinnamon treat for breakfast. I make the whole box and freeze the remainder, then reheat in a saucepan with a little milk for the next time.

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    I have been using the Quinoa for a while now and I find it very versatile. I use it for breakfast, boiled in skimmed milk a teaspoon of honey and a choice of fruit sprinkled on top...or for dinner I boil in salted water a few sprigs of mint, a handful of fresh peas and to finish a little butter placed on top.

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    Guest GirlnPurpledress

    Posted

    Very interesting article and I will certainly try some quinoa. Just one thing, Ms Cafferty suggests using it instead of rice or couscous, but I thought couscous contains gluten. Am I mistaken?

    Yes, couscous is not wheat or gluten free.

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    I also have a problem digesting quinoa. This morning I had intestinal pain and found in my bowel movement a whole intact undigested grain. One might be because I didn't wash the quinoa. Two is that you should boil it for as long as possible till the tails are wiggling out. I probably didn't cook some of it well enough. Also I would recommend three times the water in case it boils down too quick.

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    Try cooking quinoa in a rice cooker instead (still a ratio 2:1). The grains cook much better and softer that way without having to watch it closely.

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    I also have a problem digesting quinoa. This morning I had intestinal pain and found in my bowel movement a whole intact undigested grain. One might be because I didn't wash the quinoa. Two is that you should boil it for as long as possible till the tails are wiggling out. I probably didn't cook some of it well enough. Also I would recommend three times the water in case it boils down too quick.

    I broke out with another round of rash and other than absolutely gluten-free food, quinoa was all I had eaten. This is what I found online and I will NEVER eat Quinoa again!

     

    Ever hear of saponins? If not think of the word soap and you'll be headed in the right direction since saponins are molecules that make a soap-like foaming reaction when shaken in a water-based solution. While they are said not to attach themselves to carriers as the gluten proteins do, saponins can poke holes in the cell membranes of the microvilli (this is all in your gut mind you). This, of course, is profoundly irritating. In short quinoa might as well be a grain and in some ways it might as well have gluten too. At least if it did people who probably should not be eating it now, would not be eating it.

     

    So to answer the question, "is quinoa gluten-free?", Yes. But don't eat it.

     

    What do you eat besides quinoa, wheat and all these other problematic grains? We've talked a bit here before about how white rice is a fairly reasonable option for most people. Since white rice has had the bran removed it is primarily a starch and the potentially irritating anti-nutrients in the bran are eliminated. If you are trying to lose weight it may not be the first thing you should turn to depending on your situation and particular health status but it is probably the best option out there in terms of grains and grain-like products.

     

    Beyond that the best way to avoid the problems faced by celiac sufferers is to make your diet primarily one of meats, fruits, vegetables and some tubers like sweet potatoes. This will have the dual benefit of eliminating gluten and similar lectins from your diet as well as clearing out the processed food content so your body can thrive on whole, clean foods that help spark all the right hormonal signals for health and vitality.

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  • About Me

    As the Founder of the Gluten Free Cooking Expo, Jen Cafferty works daily with people dealing with gluten intolerances. Jen is gluten-free and her two children and husband are also gluten-free. Providing classes and consulting to gluten-free clients in the Chicago area, Jen is an excellent resource for your gluten-free questions and concerns.

    For More Information: Visit the Gluten Free Cooking Expo's Blog for more quick and easy quinoa recipes. For more Thanksgiving recipes go to www.gfreelife.com and download the Gluten-Free Dairy-Free Thanksgiving E-Cookbook.

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