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    Researchers 'Very Close' to Developing Celiac-safe Wheat


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 08/28/2013 - Researchers at Washington State University are 'very close' to developing celiac-safe wheat strains, says lead project researcher Diter von Wettstein.


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    Photo: CC--jayneanddRich Koenig, associate dean and director of WSU Extension, says the wheat project involves removing the gluten material that causes the adverse reaction in people who have celiac disease.

    Von Wettstein says that his team has developed wheat hybrids that have 76.4 percent less gluten proteins than conventional strains, and that the next step is to eliminate the remaining percentage.

    Von Wettstein is working two distinct angles on this project. The first approach uses genetic modification, while the seconds does not. He acknowledges that doing it without genetic modification "would be better…But in the end, if the only way to do this is through genetic modification of wheat, it could still be a major advancement for people who suffer from that disease."

    The projects may still take a while as von Wettstein works to identify, selectively silence and remove the responsible genes.

    One caveat is that even if the project is successful, the wheat may not produce flour suitable for baking, though Koenig says that producing wheat suitable for people with celiac disease would be, nonetheless, an "important subsection of wheat production"

    Funding for von Wettstein's research is coming from The National Institutes of Health and Washington State's Life Science Discovery Fund.

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    I don't think gmo wheat is going to be accepted so what is the point here. Especially if the flour is still unsuitable for bread. Farmers can just switch to growing a different grain for celiacs. Sorry, but I think this is a waste of research money.

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    Guest Peggy Detmers

    Posted

    Even if they remove the gluten, the addictive gliadin proteins that break down into an opiate remain. It is best to stay away from grains and eat a paleolithic diet.

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    Hopefully, the gluten-free wheat will be developed without making it just another risky GMO. I get severe stomach pains, and other symptoms, if I eat any of the current GM foods, and there is no reason to believe that I'll be able to tolerate any future ones. I would try non-GM wheat if can be rendered completely gluten-free.

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    One of the dumbest ideas that I can recall hearing about.

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    #1. I am opposed to anything GMO and will do everything I can to avoid it as much as possible.

    #2. After working so hard to avoid wheat the very last thing I would want to do is reintroduce it into my diet, celiac safe or not!

     

    I sincerely wish that the time and money spent on developing a new strain of wheat would be spent on something medically more important.

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    Guest Richard

    Posted

    What good will gluten-free wheat be? Will the wheat flour be any better than rice flour, or buckwheat flour, or quinoa flour without the gluten in it? I doubt it, but I bet it'll cost a lot more!

    Stop doing useless research and find a cure for the disease.

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    I'd never willingly put this thing in my mouth.

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    I say why bother. It is gluten that gives bread all its lovliness. Wheat with less/no gluten will produce the same results in bread that we have now with other grains, and that is pretty awful bread...

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    Why? If it's not good for baking then why not just use other flours?

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    I say why bother. It is gluten that gives bread all its lovliness. Wheat with less/no gluten will produce the same results in bread that we have now with other grains, and that is pretty awful bread...

    I know so many that would agree, what my grand kids would give for a decent piece of bread for a sandwich.

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    Dumbest thing I have ever heard. Quit screwing with the food chain folks!!!!

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    I'm doubtful about the results but glad someone is taking an interest in the problem. I think Franz 7 grains Gluten Free bread is pretty good. It could be I am starting to finally forget what good bread taste like after 2 years. I guess either works.

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    Guest Sachin Rustgi and Diter von Wettstein

    Posted

    I don't think gmo wheat is going to be accepted so what is the point here. Especially if the flour is still unsuitable for bread. Farmers can just switch to growing a different grain for celiacs. Sorry, but I think this is a waste of research money.

    Celiac-safe wheat lines do not exist but will be accepted, when the source of celiac causing indigestible protein fragments from the ~50 gliadin and low molecular weight glutenin proteins have been eliminated from the endosperm of the bread and pasta wheat grains. Different celiac patients are sensitive to different gliadins or low molecular weight glutenins. These have thus to be silenced or eliminated. Baking properties are alone determined by the six high molecular glutenin proteins, which are retained in the grain. Our research has established that gene introduction(s) via transgenic methods, does not influence the expression of the rest of the genes in the genome of a plant, and cause less variation in comparison with conventional breeding methods, where a gene is introduced via crossing into plant genotypes. It is a mistake to talk about gluten-free wheat as gluten comprises all proteins, lipids, fatty acids, starch and cell walls in the grain. Gluten contains 80% of the total 11-13% of proteins stored in a wheat grain. The rest is represented by the other chemical molecules, which are either unaltered or even increased in the prospective wheat celiac safe genotypes. Field planting of “Genetic modified organisms†(gmo), i.e., wheat lines, is permitted with appropriate space planting of the genetic transformants from other varieties upon permits obtained from the relevant US government organization.

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    Guest Sachin Rustgi and Diter von Wettstein

    Posted

    Hopefully, the gluten-free wheat will be developed without making it just another risky GMO. I get severe stomach pains, and other symptoms, if I eat any of the current GM foods, and there is no reason to believe that I'll be able to tolerate any future ones. I would try non-GM wheat if can be rendered completely gluten-free.

    Most likely you have been testing GM-crops like maize and/or soybean. These transgenic crops are tolerant for herbicides or insect/pest resistance due to the introduction of a protein, which might lead to a reaction in exceptional cases.

    Since some celiac patients are sensitive to High Molecular Weight Glutenin, we are producing wheat grains and rice grains that contain Heat-stable (1000C) enzymes that survive baking during bread formation and will upon consumption degrade the celiac inducing proteins of wheat in the stomach and intestine. An added advantage of expressing these natural therapeutic enzymes in wheat grains is to improve the bio-availability of gluten proteins leading to reduced nutritional deficiencies even in healthy individuals.

    In another approach we introduce into the wheat genome a hairpin ribonucleic acid (RNA) which occurs naturally in cereals and is destined to be degraded. We target it to the transcripts of celiac inducing proteins.

     

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    Guest Sachin Rustgi and Diter von Wettstein

    Posted

    Even if they remove the gluten, the addictive gliadin proteins that break down into an opiate remain. It is best to stay away from grains and eat a paleolithic diet.

    The complex mixture of seed storage proteins known as “glutenâ€, in a single bread wheat variety, is comprised of up to 45 different gliadins, 7–16 low-molecular-weight glutenins and 3–6 high-molecular-weight glutenins. We undertook two different approaches to either eliminate celiac causing gliadin and glutenin protein families by silencing their master regulator responsible for there synthesis and accumulation in wheat grains or detoxify all gluten proteins by expressing gluten degrading enzymes, i.e., ‘glutenases'. Thus, these two approaches take care of celiac causing epitopes (un-digestible protein peptides) derived from both gliadins and glutenins.

    Strict adherence to a diet totally devoid of any wheat, barley, rye and oat grains, or specialty foods manufactured for gluten sensitive, intolerant and allergenic individuals has demonstrated to slowly deteriorate gut health of the consumer by its negative influence on gut microbiota (micro-organisms). It has been shown that this type of diet also increases risk of colon cancer in the consumers. It is because of the lack or reduced content of dietary fibers (which are fermented by the gut micro-organisms to generate health beneficial compounds) and bioactive compounds like a number of antioxidants.

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    Guest Diter von Wettstein and Sachin Rustgi

    Posted

    One of the dumbest ideas that I can recall hearing about.

    “If you were a celiac patient you would not consider you're healing a dumbest ideaâ€.

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    Guest Diter von Wettstein and Sachin Rustgi

    Posted

    #1. I am opposed to anything GMO and will do everything I can to avoid it as much as possible.

    #2. After working so hard to avoid wheat the very last thing I would want to do is reintroduce it into my diet, celiac safe or not!

     

    I sincerely wish that the time and money spent on developing a new strain of wheat would be spent on something medically more important.

    There is no reason for you not to avoid genetically modified organisms. But there are 1.5% or more of the populations world-wide that have celiac disease and are seriously disabled by the disease.

    That is not the opinion of other celiac patients. Additionally we are working on a project of engineering wheat lines for eliminating immunogenic gluten proteins and increase dietary fiber and lignin content in wheat grain to avoid obesity. This is now possible with the new transgenic technologies.

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    Guest Sachin Rustgi and Diter von Wettstein

    Posted

    What good will gluten-free wheat be? Will the wheat flour be any better than rice flour, or buckwheat flour, or quinoa flour without the gluten in it? I doubt it, but I bet it'll cost a lot more!

    Stop doing useless research and find a cure for the disease.

    Strict adherence to a diet totally devoid of any wheat, barley, rye and oat grains, or specialty foods manufactured for gluten sensitive, intolerant and allergenic individuals has demonstrated to slowly deteriorate gut health of the consumer by its negative influence on gut microbiota (micro-organisms). It has been shown that this type of diet also increases risk of colon cancer in the consumers. It is because of the lack or reduced content of dietary fibers (which are fermented by the gut micro-organisms to generate health beneficial compounds) and bioactive compounds like a number of antioxidants. In view of the above a number of countries recommend a daily bread intake of about 250g-350g (depending on national food habits), whereas the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends eating bread several times per day, which is not possible in case of celiac patients. Thus, it is important to develop celiac safe wheat lines, which are devoid of celiac disease causing protein elements, but retain and/or show compensatory increase in amount of other beneficial molecules. Moreover, some individuals are sensitive to wheat, barley and rye gluten proteins, some to oat proteins. Thus, the logical solution is to make these grains suitable for human consumption and that is what our project is about.

    Another emerging problem is the detection of low amount of gluten in the specialty (allegedly ‘gluten-free') foods manufactured for gluten sensitive, intolerant and allergenic individuals using the traditional antibody based kits, which often result in misdiagnosis leading to mislabeling of commodities. The American Dietetic Association recently reported a number of cases where gluten contamination was observed in flours derived from the inherently gluten-free grains (these samples were collected from a number of grocery stores), which impose a threat to the health of consumers due to misbranding. Thus, a general solution will be develop grains naturally devoid of the toxic proteins, and eventually make cultivation of these grains a norm rather than as a specialty crop.

    An added advantage of eliminating low molecular weight glutenins and gliadins, which are exceptionally poor in an essential amino acid lysine is the compensatory increase in the amount of lysine rich proteins, which improves the nutritional value of wheat proteins close to milk proteins and also improve their bioavailability. Thus, these changes in protein composition of wheat will not result in reduction of its total grain protein content but will rather improve its nutritive value.

     

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    Guest Sachin Rustgi and Diter von Wettstein

    Posted

    I'd never willingly put this thing in my mouth.

    If you mean bread made from celiac safe wheat than you don't need to unless you have developed celiac disease. However we believe that the debate about the transgenics the so called Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) will settle down with time and the GMO's will be accepted without any resistance by the general public. It has happened to all new technologies, including radiation induced mutations, which were first created in 1926 by the Nobelist Dr. Hermann Joseph Muller, and now are widely accepted. But it took 50 years for the general public to accept them though the work of Dr. Ake Gustafsson [mentor of Drs. Robert (Bob) Nilan and Diter von Wettstein]. Similarly the microwave ovens initially received lots of skepticism and are now widely accepted.

    It has also been demonstrated by our research on expression profiles of >41,000 genes and >1400 metabolites in the transgenic plants, their parental genotypes, and the lines derived from the cross of parental genotypes, that more variations are introduced in plant genome by crossing in comparison with modifying plants by genetic engineering. Reason behind this difference is reliance of the former procedure on the stochastic natural recombination events whereas the latter process is much more regulated and does not rely on natural recombination. It is clear through the above and the other similar studies that GMOs are nearly isogenic to their parental genotypes, and carry less variations than the lines produced through traditional breeding, thus the myth of them being damaging to our ecosystem are immaterial. The transfer of foreign genes from distantly related organism has also occurred in nature even from organisms as distant as bacteria/Archaea, and is known as ‘horizontal transfer' in scientific language, which means not through a vertical descent. The best the example is the establishment of photosynthetic system in the higher plant. The chloroplast (the food manufacturing unit of plants) and the mitochondria (the powerhouse of the higher organisms) the two vital organelles in a plant cell are considered to be symbionts, who at one time point during the establishment of terrestrial life inhabited the plant cells and later have transferred may vital genes to the plant genome now known as ‘promiscuous DNA'.

    Thus, in future, you may consider taking it into your mouth, because disease resistant, climate resistant and herbicide resistant wheat and barley lines will now be made safely with known genes in two years by transgenic procedures instead of 12-14 years by hybridization and selection.

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    Guest Sachin Rustgi and Diter von Wettstein

    Posted

    I say why bother. It is gluten that gives bread all its lovliness. Wheat with less/no gluten will produce the same results in bread that we have now with other grains, and that is pretty awful bread...

    We are not working on gluten-free wheat, but on celiac safe wheat and wheat with other improved properties.

    Celiac-safe wheat lines do not exist but will be accepted, when the source of celiac causing undigestible protein fragments from the ~50 gliadin and low molecular weight glutenin proteins have been eliminated from the endosperm of the bread and pasta wheat grains. Different celiac patients are sensitive to different gliadins or low molecular weight glutenins. These have thus to be silenced or eliminated. Baking properties are alone determined by the six high molecular glutenin proteins, which are retained in the grain. Our research has established that gene introduction(s) via transgenic methods, does not influence the expression of the rest of the genes in the genome of a plant, and cause less variation in comparison with conventional breeding methods, where a gene is introduced via crossing into plant genotypes. It is a mistake to talk about gluten-free wheat as gluten comprises all proteins, lipids, fatty acids, starch and cell walls in the grain. Gluten contains 80% of the total 11-13% of proteins stored in a wheat grain. The rest is represented by the other chemical molecules, which are either unaltered or even increased in the prospective wheat celiac safe genotypes. Field planting of “Genetic modified organisms†(gmo), i.e., wheat lines, is permitted with appropriate space planting of the genetic transformants from other varieties upon permits obtained from the relevant US government organization.

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    Guest Diter von Wettstein and Sachin Rustgi

    Posted

    I know so many that would agree, what my grand kids would give for a decent piece of bread for a sandwich.

    That will require wheat resistance to every developing viral, fungal and insecticidal pathogens as well as climatic and soil adaptation. Knowing the genes involved - and these are being sequenced and characterized presently - the decent piece of bread can be preserved. The gene technology that can accomplish this is TALE (transcriptional activation like expression), which can induce site-specific mutations in the genome.

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    Guest Diter von Wettstein and Sachin Rustgi

    Posted

    Dumbest thing I have ever heard. Quit screwing with the food chain folks!!!!

    Sorry for your ignorance!

    Breeding of wheat has been carried out for at least 10.000 years.

    Celiac-safe wheat lines do not exist but will be accepted, when the source of celiac causing undigestible protein fragments from the ~50 gliadin and low molecular weight glutenin proteins have been eliminated from the endosperm of the bread and pasta wheat grains. Different celiac patients are sensitive to different gliadins or low molecular weight glutenins. These have thus to be silenced or eliminated. Baking properties are alone determined by the six high molecular glutenin proteins, which are retained in the grain. Our research has established that gene introduction(s) via transgenic methods, does not influence the expression of the rest of the genes in the genome of a plant, and cause less variation in comparison with conventional breeding methods, where a gene is introduced via crossing into plant genotypes. It is a mistake to talk about gluten-free wheat as gluten comprises all proteins, lipids, fatty acids, starch and cell walls in the grain. Gluten contains 80% of the total 11-13% of proteins stored in a wheat grain. The rest is represented by the other chemical molecules, which are either unaltered or even increased in the prospective wheat celiac safe genotypes. Field planting of “Genetic modified organisms†(gmo), i.e., wheat lines, is permitted with appropriate space planting of the genetic transformants from other varieties upon permits obtained from the relevant US government organization.

     

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    Guest Diter von Wettstein and Sachin Rustgi

    Posted

    Most likely you have been testing GM-crops like maize and/or soybean. These transgenic crops are tolerant for herbicides or insect/pest resistance due to the introduction of a protein, which might lead to a reaction in exceptional cases.

    Since some celiac patients are sensitive to High Molecular Weight Glutenin, we are producing wheat grains and rice grains that contain Heat-stable (1000C) enzymes that survive baking during bread formation and will upon consumption degrade the celiac inducing proteins of wheat in the stomach and intestine. An added advantage of expressing these natural therapeutic enzymes in wheat grains is to improve the bio-availability of gluten proteins leading to reduced nutritional deficiencies even in healthy individuals.

    In another approach we introduce into the wheat genome a hairpin ribonucleic acid (RNA) which occurs naturally in cereals and is destined to be degraded. We target it to the transcripts of celiac inducing proteins.

    There is a typographical mistake in our response, by 1000C we meant to say 100 degree celsius

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    Celiac-safe wheat lines do not exist but will be accepted, when the source of celiac causing indigestible protein fragments from the ~50 gliadin and low molecular weight glutenin proteins have been eliminated from the endosperm of the bread and pasta wheat grains. Different celiac patients are sensitive to different gliadins or low molecular weight glutenins. These have thus to be silenced or eliminated. Baking properties are alone determined by the six high molecular glutenin proteins, which are retained in the grain. Our research has established that gene introduction(s) via transgenic methods, does not influence the expression of the rest of the genes in the genome of a plant, and cause less variation in comparison with conventional breeding methods, where a gene is introduced via crossing into plant genotypes. It is a mistake to talk about gluten-free wheat as gluten comprises all proteins, lipids, fatty acids, starch and cell walls in the grain. Gluten contains 80% of the total 11-13% of proteins stored in a wheat grain. The rest is represented by the other chemical molecules, which are either unaltered or even increased in the prospective wheat celiac safe genotypes. Field planting of “Genetic modified organisms†(gmo), i.e., wheat lines, is permitted with appropriate space planting of the genetic transformants from other varieties upon permits obtained from the relevant US government organization.

    You may want to do some more research on this topic. For many years researchers have known that a non-GMO celiac safe wheat does in fact exist:

    http://www.celiac.com/articles/1066/1/Is-Triticum-Monococcum-Einkorn-a-Safe-Wheat-for-those-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

     

    http://www.celiac.com/articles/872/1/Baking-Quality-Wheat-Ancestors-May-be-Safe-for-Those-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

     

    What you are actually doing--which is supported by an ~900K corporate grant (if I recall correctly)--is to create a GMO version that you can patent in order to make money selling the seeds. This is not necessary, as what you seek already exists naturally, and I did explain this to your professor years ago.

     

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    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au