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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Gluten-free Income Tax Deduction Tips

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Caption: Photo: CC--401(k) 2012

    Celiac.com 02/10/2016 - Can you take a tax deduction for your celiac-related gluten-free purchases? Well, income tax season is upon us once again, and so it's time to brush up on our tax rules.

    Photo: CC--401(k) 2012People with celiac disease can rack up thousands of dollars per year in extra food, medical, and other health-related costs. However, many people who eat gluten-free diets as treatment for celiac disease or other medical conditions may be eligible for tax breaks.

    Check out our earlier article on the topic: Are You Due For a Gluten-free Tax Break. Also, check out The Celiac Tax Deduction: What's New? by Howard J. Kass, C.P.A.

    Meanwhile, over at Forbes, Todd Ganos has a funny article where he riffs on gluten-free and celiac themes to drive home the point that one-size trusts and asset protection schemes are often not what they claim to be, and many of them are ineffective products aimed at people with less resources. To avoid getting stuck with a poor product, Ganos recommends turning to the IRS and to US case law to best vet the contents of any given asset protection product, especially such names as "The Gluten-Free Impenetrable Castle Asset Protection Trust."

    Remember, if you eat a gluten-free diet as treatment for celiac disease or other medical conditions you may be eligible for tax breaks.

    First and foremost, we at Celiac.com are neither lawyers, accountants, or tax professionals, and do not give tax advice. So, be sure to check in with the IRS, an accountant or a tax professional for answers to your specific tax questions and challenges. Stay tuned for more as tax season progresses.


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    Please update for 2015 /2016 rules…this refers to an article written in 2012….old information.

    The tax rules haven't changed since then with regard to this deduction.

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    Nice to have this option and I imagine for large gluten-free families it makes a difference, but not for us. Our extra expenses (3 people) are only about $400/year and does not make a dent in our already squeezed middle-class taxes, since we do not have any other major medical expenses.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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