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  • Jefferson Adams

    Gluten-Free Marijuana Edibles Gaining Popularity

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Jonathunder
    Caption: Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Jonathunder

    Celiac.com 03/28/2014 - Great news for some celiac and gluten-intolerant folks in Colorado! Legal marijuana sales began in Colorado on Jan. 1, 2014, and new shop owners have been surprised to find a strong the market for marijuana edibles. More and more, makers of these edibles are including gluten-free selections.

    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--JonathunderIn some ways, it seems both natural and inevitable that the rising retail market for gluten-free good and the rising retail market for edible cannabis products should overlap.



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    That is what is happening now in Colorado. As marijuana retailers such to meet the demand for weed, they are also rushing to meet the demand for edible cannabis products.

    This, in turn, has many manufacturers across Colorado racing to bake, inject, spray and infuse marijuana into nearly every kind of edible form, with many taking steps to include gluten-free items among their products.

    Once relegated to regular marijuana ground up into cookies or brownies, the manufacture of edibles now entails bakers using concentrated extracts of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, marijuana's active ingredient), usually suspended oil, and then incorporated into foods ranging from cookies to mints and candies, olive oil, granola bars, chocolate truffles, spaghetti sauce, and marijuana-infused sodas in flavors like sparkling peach and sarsaparilla.

    Experts say edibles tend to give consumers a slightly different "high," because, instead of entering the lungs and moving directly into the bloodstream, the THC is first processed by the stomach and absorbed via the digestive system. The high takes longer to begin, is usually less intense, and longer lasting than with smoked cannabis.

    All edibles sold in Colorado's marijuana retail outlets are produced in commercial facilities. Many are labeled for potency. Commercial gluten-free products must follow FDA labeling guidelines for purity.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Jenny, I promise your children won't get their hands on any edibles unless they ask for them. Which they probably will when they are in high school. Sorry.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Jenny, YOU are the parent. It's up to YOU to police your own children. They're YOUR responsibility, and no one else's. And whose fault is it that you live with a "user?"

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    Guest Jefferson Adams

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Joke? Obviously you don't know anyone with cancer or the myriad other conditions that cannabis can help alleviate. As for kids, I guess we keep it out of their hands by smart regulation and common sense adult supervision, the same way we make sure your kids don't drink booze or smoke cigarettes.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    Only way your children will get these is if they try really hard. No dispensary will ever sell to anyone under the age of 21. Simmer down please. You lived with one person who happened to abuse marijuana and let his or her life go down the tubes because they found cannabis more appealing than other things.

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    Legalizing cannabis is a big joke. How the hell do you police this eatable produce laced with cannabis to ensure our children do not have access to them?

     

    Seriously this is the biggest let down for the future of our children. I had lived with a long term user and can say first hand there is nothing good about this. God help the future of your country.

    The same way you make sure your kids don't accidentally take all the poisons the big pharma and their doctor friends are shoving down the throats of our people everyday? I suppose it is the same way you keep firearms away from a child or keep them from drowning and stuff like that! It's called being a responsible parent, hello!

     

    I'd bet your own "trusting" Dr. is probably giving your kid Ritalin or some other new poison to make sure he just sits in that chair and shuts up, and because of that problem the Doc has you on some little happy pills, some Ambien and than something to take for dry mouth you got from your mornings legal chemical cocktail...

     

    Watch Sanjay Gupta's Charlottes Web, imagine she was your child, education is the key...

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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