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  • Jefferson Adams

    Gluten-Free Personal Care Market Sees Rapid Expansion

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 03/16/2011 - The market for gluten-free cosmetics and personal care products seemsto be enjoying some of the same rapid growth seen over the last severalyears by the gluten-free food industry.

    As a result, many companies are moving to create new, gluten-freeproducts and formulations for consumers who suffer from celiac diseaseor gluten intolerance.

    From 2007 to 2009,  gluten-free cosmetics and personal care market sawthe launch of seventeen new gluten-free cosmetics and personal careproducts, while the number of gluten-free lip products rose from one to10, according to Mintel.

    Gluten-free, Vegan, vegetarian and cruelty-free are all making strong headway in the personal and beauty care industry.

    In 2007, a company called Symrise introduced a gluten-free alternativeto common wheat- and milk soy-derived proteins. Symrise's two,gluten-free, plant-based moisturizing ingredients, Hydromoist L andHydromoist O, are derived from lupine and oats, respectively. They makemake a suitable ingredient in certain shampoos.

    In 2009, color cosmetics and personal care manufacturer Logona NaturalCosmetics launched an all gluten-free line featuring 155 products.

    Natural skincare product creator Natural Bodycare has introduced a lineof more than 90 formulas is now 100-percent vegan and mostlygluten-free, with the exception of two products that contain Avenasativa (oat) kernel extract, which may have traces of gluten.

    From cosmetics to body and skin care products and ingredients, themarket for gluten-free personal care products is rapidly expanding.Because of this expansion, people with celiac disease and glutenintolerance can now enjoy personal body care products that just a fewyears ago would have been unavailable. It looks like more gluten-freepersonal care companies, products and developments are just around thecorner.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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