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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    This recipe comes to us from A.J. McEvoy.
    Yeast Mix:
    ¼ cup warm water
    1 ½ teaspoon sugar
    2-teaspoons Red Star yeast (or your favorite gluten-free brand) Dry Mixture:
    1 cup tapioca starch
    ½ cup quinoa flour (or you can try amaranth flour in its place)
    ½ cup sweet rice flour
    ½ cup potato starch
    1/3 cup powdered dry milk
    ¼ cup soy flour
    3 tablespoons sugar (I prefer C&H Ultra-Fine Bakers Sugar; it mixes best)
    2 teaspoons xanthan Gum Wet Mixture:
    2 large eggs, well beaten
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 cup warm water
    ¾ teaspoon apple cider or wine vinegar Start yeast mix, and leave it in a warm (not HOT) place so it can grow while you mix the other ingredients. By the time the other ingredients are combined, the yeast mix should have a cap of cream-colored froth on top. If your yeast doesnt do this, either your water was too hot, or your yeast is old and dead.
    Measure ingredients in the order listed into a large mixing bowl, making sure to mix thoroughly (I like to run the whole dry batch through a sifter afterward, but this is really not necessary). Add the oil to the eggs. Add the vinegar to the water. Then add these to each other.
    Add wet mix to dry mix, stirring well. You can use a dough mixer, but a good, strong arm will do the trick nicely. Lastly, add the yeast mixture, stirring until evenly mixed. Cover bowl loosely with plastic wrap, leaving it in a warm (and preferably, dark) place to rise for 30 minutes.
    After first rise, stir dough, beating out most of the air-bubbles. Grease a medium-sized bread pan. Spoon the dough into the pan; then cover and let rise a second time in a warm, dark place for another 30 minutes.
    Bake at 350 degrees for 50-60 minutes. Leave to cool in pan for 10 minutes, then remove from pan to cool on a cooling rack for no less than 15 minutes before slicing (When Im over-eager and slice the bread too soon, it caves in the middle, leaving bread slices that are misshapen).
    FOR PIZZA CRUST:
    Use basically the same recipe, reducing water in wet mixture to ¾ cup, and using brown rice flour in place of quinoa flour in the dry mixture.
    After first rise, spoon dough into the middle of a greased 12 pizza pan. Dust top of dough ball with tapioca starch, so it wont stick to your hands. Dust fingertips as well. Using your fingers, flatten the dough, working to stretch it to the outer edges of the pan. Over a sink, use a turkey baster to puff air across the crust to remove the excess starch from the crusts top (Or, if youre feeling particularly uncouth, you can just blow on it!) Brush crust with olive oil. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and leave pan in a warm dark place to rise for 30 minutes.
    Bake crust for 12-15 minutes in a 350 degree oven. Remove from oven. Cover with sauce and toppings. Bake at 350 for 15-20 minutes.

    Scott Adams
    This recipe comes to us from Ayesha Iqbal.
    Use in equal measures:
    -Chick pea flour (also known as gram flour and basin in Indian shops)
    -Pounded yam flour

    Mix the two flours together (50:50) with some water and a little oil to produce dough. Leave the dough in the refrigerator to rest (1 hour).
    Make small balls and shape into flat bread and cook in a flat pan / griddle/ frying pan. It can be cooked with or without oil. The dough can stay in the fridge for a few days. The flat bread can be frozen and reheated in the toaster.

    Scott Adams
    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup butter
    2 eggs
    3 tablespoons sour milk mixed with a bit of lemon juice
    1 teaspoon soda
    Vanilla
    2 cups corn starch
    Pinch of salt
    3 bananas (mashed)
    Mix everything together with the exception of the bananas. In a separate bowl, beat the bananas with a mixer until smooth. Combine the two and mix thoroughly. Bake in a loaf pan at 325F for 60-70 minutes (or longer) until a toothpick stuck in the center comes out clean.

    Jefferson Adams
    The season of green is upon us once again and a Saint Patrick’s Day celebration wouldn’t be complete without a hearty piece of Irish soda bread. Reminiscent of a large scone, this recipe yields delightfully sweet bread. My Irish friends tell me a good crumbly piece of “Leprechaun Bread” goes great with a sharp cheddar cheese. I think a dab of butter and sprinkle of cinnamon is a nice topper as well.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup brown rice flour
    ¼  cup tapioca flour
    ¼  cup potato starch
    1 teaspoon xanthan gum
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    ½ teaspoon baking soda
    ½ teaspoon unflavored gelatin
    ½ teaspoon nutmeg
    ¼ cup buttermilk
    6 tablespoons melted butter
    1 tablespoon honey
    1 egg, beaten
    ½ cup raisins or currants, soaked in hot water for 10 minutes
    Directions:
    Preheat oven to 350° F and line a standard loaf pan or baking dish with parchment paper.
    In a large bowl, combine all dry ingredients until well-incorporated.
    In a second bowl, stir together buttermilk, butter, honey, egg and soaked raisins.
    Hollow out a small well in the dry ingredients and slowly pour in the wet mixture. Stir until combined and sticky. Form into a loaf and transfer to baking pan. Cook for 35-40 minutes until a knife inserted in the middle comes out clean.
    Let cool and remove from parchment-line dish.


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    Did you actually get a complete celiac panel?   https://www.verywellhealth.com/celiac-disease-blood-tests-562694 Doing allergy testing (IgG) is well sort of helpful, but not very accurate per all the leading allergy groups.  You can google that.   Since 2012, have you ever thought about going gluten free for six months?  Unless you really need a firm diagnosis, it is something to consider.  My hubby did that some 20 years ago and is healthy.  Oddly,  I was  diagnosed with celiac d
    Thank you so much.  No doctor would refer me to a gastro doctor, so I made an appointment myself without referral.  I took all my copies of bloodworkwith me and begged for help.  I explained my situation. He was one of the best in my town.  I was told to throw all my integrative tests in the trash and to gain 20 pounds and I would feel better.  At the time I was my normal thin self.  He said my bloodwork looked good and I was not a risk factor.  I may try to see another specialist and see if any
    Yes, celiac runs in families. You can have testing done to see if you carry the chromosomes that predispose you to it. There are many folks who have the chromosomes who never develop celiac, but it is my understanding that if you don’t have those chromosomes then you probably don’t have celiac.... with the caveat that they are finding more genetic markers as time progresses. If your brother has celiac, you are at risk, but not guaranteed to develop celiac disease. All celiacs have to be ext
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