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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    Holiday Pumpkin Bread (Gluten-Free)


    Jennifer Arrington

    During the holidays I find myself missing certain holiday foods terribly.  The one that really gets me is pumpkin pie.  No matter what anyone says, it’s just not possible to make a gluten-dairy-sugar-free pumpkin pie and call it a pie...


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    So, this holiday, in the quest for something pumpkin-y I came up with a simple recipe for pumpkin bread that I can eat with abandon, that tastes great, and that doesn’t contain any gluten, dairy, or table sugar (sucrose).

    Gluten-Free Pumkin BreadIngredients

    1. 1 package (8 oz.) Fearn Brown Rice Baking Mix.  The box contains 2 packages of mix – 8oz each.
    2. 1 - 15 oz. can pumpkin
    3. ½ to 1 tsp. cinnamon
    4. ½ to 1 tsp. pumpkin pie spice
    5. 2 eggs
    6. ½ cup olive oil
    7. ½ cup unsweetened applesauce

     

    Directions

    1. Preheat oven to 350F.
    2. Place a small amount of olive oil in the bottoms of 4 mini-loaf pans. (I use ceramic pans purchased from Michaels for a whopping 99c each).
    3. In a large mixing bowl, mix eggs and pumpkin until well blended.
    4. Add oil and applesauce and mix well.
    5. In a separate bowl, combine one package of Fearn Brown Rice Baking Mix with the cinnamon and pumpkin pie spice.  (I vary my amounts of spice depending on the mood of the day but usually use between ½ - 1 tsp of each.)
    6. Mix the dry ingredients into the pumpkin mixture until all ingredients are well blended.   The mixture will be quite thick.
    7. Spoon into 4 prepared mini-loaf pans.
    8. Bake at 350F for 35-45 minutes or until the tops are brown.  Test for "doneness" with a toothpick. 

     

    I enjoy my pumpkin bread served warm with Organic Smart Balance butter spread.  My children (who can thankfully eat mostly anything) eat it with a dollop of Redi Whip.  If I eat it for dessert, I heat up a slice and then add Silk Soy Vanilla Yogurt on the side.  This quite satisfies my dessert-with-cream longing.

    Happy gluten-free eating!


    Image Caption: Gluten-Free Pumkin Bread
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    Guest beth boncher

    Posted

    My mom and I have come up with a pumpkin pie that uses tofu, apple juice, rice(for the crust, but still experimenting), and pumpkin along with other spices. This tastes pretty close to pumpkin pie. We are still working on the crust.

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    Guest bobbi

    Posted

    Grind one cup of whole almonds in the blender and pack into an oiled or buttered pie pan or dish. Pour in pie filling and do not bake over 300 degrees. Almonds will burn easily. It looks like graham cracker crust but tastes very much like real pie crust.

     

    Vita Mix makes almond butter. My Oster blender works best. This takes a little practice. Do not give up.

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    Guest bobbi

    Posted

    PUMPKIN PIE RECIPE: Mix dry ingredients together

    1 tsp. NOW brand white stevia powder

    1 tsp. sweet and low or other sweetener

    1 tsp cinnamon

    1 tsp. cloves

    1/2 tsp. salt

    Beat into 1 can pumpkin

    Stir wet ingredients together and beat into pumpkin:

    3 eggs

    2 tsp. vanilla, 1/4 tsp. rum flav., few drops maple flav, opt.

    I bake in an ground almond crust at 300 degrees for about 4o min. until center is almost set. Oven vary.

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    Guest Elizabeth

    Posted

    You can also look up the recipe for "Quinoa Applesauce Cake" and replace the applesauce with a can of pumpkin to make a singular flour gluten-free pumpkin cake/bread! This recipe was my invention :) I've even done a "Quinoa Carrot Cake" with a bit of fresh ground ginger and apple with the 2 cups of carrot shreds. There is a recipe online for this.

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    Guest Maureen

    Posted

    I know this sounds weird, but what could I sub for the applesauce? LO is allergic to apples as well as wheat and I am trying to find a decent spice cake for her.

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    Guest Cedars

    Posted

    I know this sounds weird, but what could I sub for the applesauce? LO is allergic to apples as well as wheat and I am trying to find a decent spice cake for her.

    You aren't the only one out there with the apple thing going. Just so you know you aren't alone. I make my pumpkin pie (LOVE pumpkin anything) with rice milk.

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    Scott Adams
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    Scott Adams

    This recipe comes to us from Gladys Jones.
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