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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Soft White Bread (Gluten-Free)

    This recipes comes to us from Kathy Scholz.

    In a small bowl combine:
    ½ cup warm water
    2 teaspoons sugar
    4 teaspoons dry yeast granules
    Set aside and let stand for 15 minutes

    2 cups white rice flour
    2 cups tapioca flour
    ¼ cup sugar
    4 teaspoons xanthan gum
    2/3 cup dry milk
    1 ½ teaspoons salt
    Combine the above six ingredients in a large bowl (use largest mixing bowl).

    1 ½ cups water
    4 tablespoons melted butter or oil
    1 teaspoon gluten-free vinegar
    3 eggs

    Mix above dry ingredients in a large bowl, and the four liquid ingredients in a small bowl, then add the butter mixture and yeast mixture to the dry ingredients. Beat on high for 2 minutes. Use two small greased bread pans, as one large one seems to cause the bread to rise too high and become like a mushroom. Allow to rise in pan, then bake at 350 degrees 20 - 25 minutes. Adjust time depending on size of loaves. Can also be made as sandwich rolls, as indicated below: use small individual pie tins (about 4 across, purchase in paper goods supply store, round out the bottom crease with your thumb and finger, or press the tin down on the bottom of a jar the appropriate size to round out the crease, these may be reused time and time again) spray the tins with cooking oil, divide dough to make about 12 sandwich rolls, place pie tins on two cookie sheets, allow to rise, if desired brush with a mixture of egg and water, sprinkle sesame seed or poppy seeds over top, before baking. Bake until nicely browned in 15 -20 minutes.

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    This looked like a great recipe - I followed it religiously - after 20 minutes of baking I gave it another 10 minutes & after cooling the center was still very raw. What a waste of time & money - too bad it tasted very good at the edges.

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    Guest Charlene Ashton

    Posted

    I use this recipe all the time, in fact I have 'modified' it for use in my bread machine. I always get a light loaf that reminds me of white wheat bread. I also use this to make hot dog and hamburger buns.

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    This is the best recipe for gluten free white bread that I have found yet. It is more like a wheat bread and even my family and friends enjoy it.

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    What did I do wrong? For me too, the first time I baked it the batter was very thick and it took a long time to bake. The second time the batter wasn't even a dough! But the first one tasted great!

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    Guest Debbie Bluestein

    Posted

    I love this recipe! My family gobbles it up! It is very easy to make, I do leave it in the oven for about 10 minutes longer stated. My only problem is that the bread keeps collapsing as it cools after de-panning. Any help that you can offer would be great.

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    I know that if I put too much dough in the bread pan it will be still doughy in the middle. Careful with how much you put in. I only fill it up about 2'- 2 1/2'. I let it rise for about 1 1/2 hour. The unfortunate part is it does collapse a little. I haven't figured that out yet. Susan...the reason the batter could have been more thick and then not as thick was how long you blended or left something out of the ingredients. It is best to blend it until it is like a paste. Just don't put too much batter in the pan and allow it to rise and it should turn out fine. Also...wait to take it out of the oven until the top is brown. Hope this helps!

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    Guest Sidney Abernathy

    Posted

    This recipe is terrible. I spent all the time preparing the ingredients and the money purchasing them, only to have the bread fall. It came out looking great but it ended up looking like a brick. What a disappointment.

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    I made this bread for my family (we have three celiacs in our family of six), this bread went over very well. My four year old took some convincing that it was actually gluten free. He kept poking it and saying "no special bread does not feel soft, gluten bread feels like this." He finally ate it and was very happy. I am going to try to use this recipe for cinnamon rolls.

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    I use this recipe all the time, in fact I have 'modified' it for use in my bread machine. I always get a light loaf that reminds me of white wheat bread. I also use this to make hot dog and hamburger buns.

    Would it be possible to get the 'modified' bread machine version of this recipe from you?

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    I use this recipe all the time, in fact I have 'modified' it for use in my bread machine. I always get a light loaf that reminds me of white wheat bread. I also use this to make hot dog and hamburger buns.

    Charlene,

    How did you modify the recipe?? My daughter is 6 years old and is on a gluten free diet. I'm in search of a bread that she likes. She says she wants something soft like the "real bread"

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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