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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Christmas Sugar Cookies (Gluten-Free)

    3 cups gluten-free flour mix*
    2 eggs
    1 teaspoon soda
    1 cup sugar
    1 teaspoon cream of tartar
    1 teaspoon almond (or flavoring of your choice)
    1 cup gluten-free margarine

    Sift flour, soda & cream of tartar - cut in margarine or butter (I find that margarine is easier when rolling out the cookies). Beat eggs, add sugar & almond - mix well. Pour egg mixture into flour mixture and mix well by hand.

    Chill at least 15 min (several days is also ok). Roll out to desired thickness on floured surface and cut into shapes. Decorate with colored sugar, or if you prefer, after baked & cooled frost and then sprinkle with colored sugar, etc.

    2 cups powdered sugar mixed with some melted butter & lemon juice frosts one batch. Bake at 350F for 9 minutes.

    * Bette Hagman's Four Flour Mix (from The Gluten-Free Gourmet Bakes Bread).
    Garfava Bean Flour 2/3 part
    Sorghum Flour 1/3 part
    Cornstarch 1 part
    Tapioca Flour 1 part



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    I found that Bette Hagman's gluten-free flour mix works better it tastes better they taste closer to the 'real thing' that is 2 parts white rice flour 2/3 parts potato startch 1/3 part tapioca flour and don't forget the xantham gum. I didn't see it in the recipe 1 1/2 teaspoons will do it it will keep them together.

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    Guest Sharon the Blogger Queen

    Posted

    Nailed it!!!! These are perfect for the holiday party today. I had to make some adjustments to the recipe because of food allergies and I didn't have Tartar. Here are my changes:

    Egg = egg replacer

    Tartar = doubled the baking soda instead

    Butter = Shortening + butter flavor

    Flour mix = Bobs Red Mill Gluten-Free Baking Mix (Yeah Bob!!)

     

    I pressed the dough into a fat disc and chilled for about an hour. Then I rolled it between sheets of plastic. Also, I ALWAYS use parchment for baking - no stick, no mess.

     

    I'm so Happy!

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    I've made these for my grand daughter for Christmas and Valentine's Day and she just loves them!! They are hard to roll out, so I pat them out on gluten free flour then press the cookie cutter in and take off with a spatula.

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    I am really happy that this website exists, I was born with celiac disease, and when I was a baby I almost died because of it. And not being able to eat like other people can be irritating. I mean I know that everyone around you isn't gonna stop eating gluten just 'cause I can't have it, I know that VERY well; I'm just glad I can have something just as good and possibly better.

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    Nailed it!!!! These are perfect for the holiday party today. I had to make some adjustments to the recipe because of food allergies and I didn't have Tartar. Here are my changes:

    Egg = egg replacer

    Tartar = doubled the baking soda instead

    Butter = Shortening + butter flavor

    Flour mix = Bobs Red Mill Gluten-Free Baking Mix (Yeah Bob!!)

     

    I pressed the dough into a fat disc and chilled for about an hour. Then I rolled it between sheets of plastic. Also, I ALWAYS use parchment for baking - no stick, no mess.

     

    I'm so Happy!

    Hi Sharon, sounds like you've got to grips with this recipe so can you tell me what it means by soda, is it bicarb of soda? Thank You Charlotte

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    This is my 8yr old sons 1st christmas gluten free, he is also allergic to refined suger. This website has given me lots of ideas. Thank you!

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    2¼ cup rice flour
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    2 teaspoons gluten-free baking soda
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    ¼ teaspoon salt
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    Scott Adams
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    Jules Shepard
    In the celiac world, there remains a long-standing controversy over whether to exclude oats and oat products from the list of "safe" gluten-free grains.  When I was diagnosed with celiac disease, standard protocol recommended against including oats in a gluten-free diet, but more recent studies show that oats themselves are likely not the source of a celiac reaction.  Instead, researchers now believe that the fact that milled oats are often contaminated with other gluten-containing grains has skewed diagnostic testing of reactions to gluten from oat products.
    The most recent scientific statements on the inclusion of a reasonable amount of oats (1 cup or less per day) in a gluten-free diet indicate that most individuals with celiac disease can actually tolerate uncontaminated oats.  However, health professionals (including the American Dietetic Association) recommend that newly diagnosed celiac patients avoid oats until the disease is well-controlled with full resolution of symptoms and normal blood tests demonstrate that tissue transglutaminase levels (IgA tTG) are under control.  Gastroenterologists also universally caution that introducing oats into your diet should only be done under the guidance of your physician.
    Federal food labeling laws and rules have incorporated this recent research and have not per se excluded oats from future "gluten-free" labeling, so long as the manufacturer seeking to dub its oat containing product "gluten-free" demonstrates that there is less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten in that product, just as in any other.  Thus, it seems the greatest hurdle to reintroducing oats to your gluten-free diet will be the shortage of mills and processing plants which produce certified "gluten-free" oats (and the resulting high cost of those few products)!
    I decided to try these outrageously expensive "gluten-free" oats myself to expand my baking horizons (of course, I discussed this with my physician first...).  I doubt I will be sitting down to a big bowl of oatmeal anytime soon, since I still love my grits and they are probably 1/5 the price of gluten-free oats!  However, as it would be challenging to make oatmeal-like cookies with grits, I dove into my $12 box of oats to see what happened.  (Granted, as time goes by, companies like Bob's Red Mill are thankfully making gluten-free oats more prolific -- and thus, less expensive -- they will always be more expensive than my grits!)
    Just as an aside, I recently found a product available (finally) in the United States that would probably make a mean oatmeal cookie for those of you who are unable or unwilling to give the gluten-free oats a try.  On one of my European adventures many years ago I thoroughly enjoyed German muesli made with rice flakes, but have since been unsuccessful finding them Stateside.  Imagine my surprise when, on a slightly less exciting adventure last week, I discovered them at David's Natural Market in Columbia, Maryland!
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    ~jules
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    1 teaspoon baking powder
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    Silka Burgoyne
    Ever since my husband diagnose with celiac disease, he was a littlebit depressed because he could not just simple go and grab something toeat. At the beginning, he tried to keep an open mind and went to storesthat sell gluten-free products. Most of the time, he was disappointedwith the taste of the products. One day, he came home from work andtold me how his co-workers teased him with a yummy looking chocolatechips cookie and he felt extremely depressed because he could not eatthem and he absolutely LOVES to snack. I found his co-workers' actionvery childish and decided that I would create a recipe the my husbandwould love and he could has plenty of supply at work so when the samesituation ever happen again, he would be prepared.
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    This recipe will makes about 2 - 21/2 dozen cookies.
    Preparation Time: 10 minutes
    Cook Time: 12-15 minutes

    INGREDIENTS:
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    Preheat oven to 375 degree and line 2 baking sheet with parchment pager or use nonstick spray to grease the baking sheet. Mix melted butter, brown sugar and sugar until incorporated, add eggs and vanilla extract until blended In a medium bowl, whisk Silka Flour Mix, baking powder, baking soda, xanthan gum and salt Stir the dry ingredients to the butter mix until incorporated.  Stir in white chocolate chip and Macadamias nut (optional) into the cookie dough  If the dough appears to be a little dry, add in milk but it's entirely optional Use a tablespoon to scoop the cookie dough onto prepared cooking sheet, space them about 2 inches apart Bake for 12-15 minutes or until cookies turn golden cool cookies for 5 minutes before transferring them into a wire rack

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