Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Preheat oven to 350.
    In a bowl mix:
    2 ¼ cups tapioca flour
    1 tsp. salt
    1/3 cup sugar
    ½ tsp. xanthan gum (omit for pie crust)
    In a blender or food processor mix:
    1 cup Filberts/Macadamias
    ¼ cup water
    ½ cup canola oil
    1 tsp. vanilla
    Grind the nuts very fine. Add contents of food processor to bowl and mix. Roll into balls and flatten. Bake on greased cookie sheet at 350 for 10 - 15 minutes, or until they begin to turn golden-brown. The recipe makes 2 ½ dozen cookies.
    This dough rolls out on a potato-starch-floured board quite successfully to make cookie-cutter cookies. It also makes an excellent pie crust - flaky and delicious. Cover the edges with foil and pre-bake for 15 minutes before filling.

    Scott Adams
    Ingredients:
    1 ½ cup gluten-free flour
    ¼ cup sweet rice flour
    1 teaspoon xanthan gum
    ½ teaspoon baking soda
    ½ teaspoon gluten-free baking powder
    1/8 teaspoon salt
    1 stick unsalted butter, room temperature
    1 cup sugar
    2 eggs
    2 teaspoon grated orange zest
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1 ½ cup chopped toasted walnuts
    Directions:
    Mix together gluten-free flour, sweet rice flour, xanthan gum, baking soda, baking powder and salt.
    Cream the butter until white. Add the sugar and beat until fluffy, about 5 minutes. Blend in the eggs, one at a time. Add the orange zest and vanilla, then stir in the nuts. Slowly incorporate the dry ingredients to form a soft dough. Refrigerate the dough for at least one hour or overnight.
    Preheat the oven to 375F. Lightly grease 2 cookie sheets and line with parchment paper.
    Divide the dough into 3 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a log 1 ½ to 2 inches thick. Place 2 logs on one sheet, and one log on the other sheet, leaving enough space between them for the dough to spread while baking. Bake the logs for 20 minutes.
    Remove the cookie sheet from the oven and let sit for 5 to 10 minutes. Slice the logs on a slight diagonal about ¾ inch thick. Place the slices, cut side down, on the cookie sheets. Lower the oven temperature to 350F and bake the slices for 10 to 12 minutes. Cool on a cooling rack. Store in an airtight container.

    Scott Adams
    This recipe comes to us from Susan Carmack.
    ¼ cup white sugar
    ½ cup brown sugar
    ½ cup butter
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1 egg
    1 cup white rice flour
    ¼ cup almond flour
    ½ teaspoon baking soda
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon guar gum
    1 cup chocolate chips
    Mix the ingredients in a food processor or mixing bowl. Add chocolate chips. Make little cookies. Bake at 350F for 6 minutes.

    Jefferson Adams
    Gingersnaps are one of my favorite holiday treats, and one of the treats that I had given up as part of my gluten-free diet.
    Here's a recipe for delicious soft, chewy, gluten-free gingersnaps that will put a holiday smile on your face and have people begging for more.
    Ingredients:
    ¾ cup shortening
    1½ cups brown sugar
    2 eggs
    ⅓ cup molasses
    ⅓ cup white sugar
    2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
    2¾ cups gluten-free flour mix
    1 teaspoon xanthan gum
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1 teaspoon ground ginger
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon ground cloves
    Directions:
    Preheat the oven to 350°. Mix the gluten-free flour, xanthan gum, and baking soda together in one bowl.
    Cream the butter and sugar in another bowl. This works best with an electric mixer. If you are doing it by hand, make sure the butter is soft.
    Add the eggs, then molasses (Plantation Barbados unsulphured molasses gets high marks, so I use that for this particular recipe), then apple cider vinegar to the creamed butter and sugar.
    Add the spices, and slowly, stir in the combined dry ingredients until the mixture is just blended. The dough should be somewhat firm, so add more or less flour as needed. I usually bake a test cookie or two to get it just right.
    Roll the dough into small balls (about one inch). Place them on a greased cookie sheet, and bake for 10 to 12 minutes, depending on your oven. Watch the first batch carefully, to judge how much time to give them.
    Here's the recipe for my basic gluten-free flour:
    Gluten-free flour mix:
    1 part white rice flour
    1 part tapioca starch
    1 part cornstarch
    I find it convenient to mix a large batch ahead of time, and then store it in an airtight container.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Forum Discussions

    Once that IBS is there they often just write every GI issue off to that. Funny story I was diagnosed as IBS symptoms only in my early 20's he told me to figure out what I can and can't eat . The immunology Dr I saw from 2016-2018 helped fill in the blanks and connect the dots for the various confusion of why some non breaded chicken breast bothered me =, but never any made by my mom or myself (people who use meat tenderizer-gluten) A-Ha thanks Dr. The coffee that was supposedly my tremors were j
    Good points, Ennis! And I might point out that this matter of gross amounts of loose flour lying and blowing around in Costco stores does not seem to happen much, if at all, with the bags of flour in grocery stores --- at least I have never noticed it like I have at Costco.
    this is a fundamental issue with MOST grain flour manufactures. I mean really...you package a product in a bag that cannot contain said product?  I mean frack, I can order almond and coconut flour in AIR TIGHT sealed bags. I mean even the 25lb bulk bags...HAVE A PLASTIC bag  INSIDE the giant paper bag to contain your flour. WHY can grain flour manufacture not do this? I order coconut, almond, and hazelnut flours in bulk and NEVER have this kind of issue...but my flours are also very expensive
×
×
  • Create New...