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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams
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    Gluten-free Lemony Coconut Snowballs

      Lemon zest adds a nice twist to these gluten-free coconut snowballs.

    Caption: Photo: CC--Stacy Spensley

    Celiac.com 03/30/2017 - As we say goodbye to winter, these gluten-free coconut snowballs are sure to please. They're easy to make, a snap to bake and a nice lemony zing makes plenty tasty.

    Ingredients:

    • 1 cup sweetened flaked coconut
    • ½ cup almond meal
    • ½ cup potato flour
    • 1¼ cups confectioners' sugar
    • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
    • 1½ teaspoons vanilla extract
    • 4 teaspoons milk
    • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon zest
    • Dash of salt

    Directions:
    Grind ½ cup of the coconut in food processor.

    Chop remaining coconut and set aside.

    To the blender, add potato flour, ¼ cup of the confectioners' sugar and the salt.

    Pulse and blend more. Put aside in a bowl.

    In the blender, beat butter and vanilla on medium speed until smooth and creamy.

    Gradually add ½ cup of confectioners’ sugar and extracts, beating until well mixed. Add potato flour, salt, almond meal and beat until combined. Stir in coconut. Cover dough and chill for 30 minutes.

    Heat oven to 350 degrees.

    Roll dough into 1-inch balls.

    Place dough balls 1 inch apart on an un-greased baking sheet.

    Bake cookies until firm, but tender, 15 minutes.

    Remove to rack, let cool completely.

    In small bowl, stir together remaining 1 cup confectioners' sugar, lemon zest, and enough milk until smooth, but still thick.

    Dip cookies in glaze (about ½ teaspoon for each), letting it drip down sides.

    Dip in chopped coconut and set aside for glaze to dry.


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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Scott Adams
    This recipe comes to us from Ann Sokolowski.
    Preheat oven to 350F and line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.
    Combine:
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    1 egg, slightly beaten
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    Scott Adams
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    Silka Burgoyne
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