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    Molasses Spice Cookies (Gluten-Free)


    Lisa Clauset

    These are the perfect holiday cookie. They are soft on the inside with just enough crisp on the outside. Delicious with a cup of tea!


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    Ingredients:
    2 ¼ cups gluten-free flour (optional: Bistro Blend All Purpose Gluten-Free Flour*)
    1 tsp pumpkin pie spice (combo of cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves and cardamom)
    1 tsp ground cinnamon
    2 tsp baking soda
    ½ tsp xanthan gum
    3/4 cup butter, melted
    1 cup sugar, plus more for rolling or sprinkling
    1 egg
    1/3 cup molasses

    Directions:
    Mix gluten-free flour, pumpkin pie spice, cinnamon, baking soda and xanthan gum in a bowl, set aside.

    In a stand mixer, mix melted butter, sugar, egg and molasses for about 2 minutes or until well combined. Slowly add the flour mixture to the sugar mixture until well combined.Remove dough from mixer, shape into a large ball and cover completely in parchment paper. Store in the refrigerator for 2 hours or more.

    When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350°F. Remove chilled dough from fridge, and scoop out dough 2 tablespoons at a time. Roll into balls and then roll the dough balls in a small bowl of sugar. Arrange on parchment lined baking sheet, leaving about 2 to 3 inches between each cookie.Bake at 350°F for 12 minutes. Let cool on a cooling rack.

    *The Bistro Blend is a blend of whole grain flours [eco-farmed brown rice flour, sorghum flour, tapioca starch, buckwheat flour, organic coconut flour, xanthan gum].

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    Yum! The cookies turned out great!

    I used Bob's Red Mill gluten-free all purpose flour. They turned out flatter than the picture shows, but very yummy!

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    Guest Rebecca

    Posted

    These were delicious! However, I did decrease the baking soda to 1-1/2 tsp and add 1/2 tsp salt (even 1/4 tsp salt would probably do it). I used a flour mix of 2 cups superfine brown rice flour, 2/3 potato starch, and 2/3 cup tapioca starch. My cookies were also a little flatter than the picture, but I liked them that way. In my opinion these were just perfect - chewy and flavorful with a little crunch along the edges. These will definitely be made again in our household!

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    Glad they turned out for you! These are one of my favorite cookies!

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    These were so good. I changed to Bob Red Mill's all-purpose flour. Everyone ate them up fast. Excited to use them this Christmas.

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    Guest lee

    Posted

    Turned out great. I used Maui Gold natural sugar to coat them. It is coarse sugar with a molasses flavor. I don't have celiac but my wife does but I'll share some with her.

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  • About Me

    I live in Boulder, Colorado which is a town that is very educated about living gluten-free. I have a background in education and nutrition. Currently I work with a company called the Gluten Free Bistro that produces gluten-free pizza crusts, pasta and flour to restaurants. I also have a deep love for cooking and baking. A sample of my writing and blog can be found here:
    http://delectablyglutenfree.blogspot.com/

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    Scott Adams
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    Jules Shepard
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