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    Gluten-Free Greek Yogurt Chocolate Mousse


    Jefferson Adams


    • This variation on a fabulous dark chocolate mousse recipe is quicker and easier to make than the fluffier traditional version with eggs.


    Gluten-Free Greek Yogurt Chocolate Mousse
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Lauren Bosak

    Celiac.com 04/07/2018 - Looking for a sumptuous, easy-to-make gluten-free, egg-free dessert that will knock the socks off your guests? Try this variation on a fabulous dark chocolate mousse recipe courtesy of Maria Speck. Not only is this mousse quicker and easier to make than the fluffier traditional version, but dark chocolate lovers will really eat it up. 


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    Ingredients:

    • 6 ounces high-quality dark chocolate with 70% cacao, finely chopped
    • 1 cup whole milk Greek-style yogurt
    • ½ cup whole milk
    • 1 or 2 tablespoons Grand Marnier, or other orange liqueur, to taste
    • 4 teaspoons orange marmalade 

    Directions:
    Place the chocolate into a medium heatproof bowl. 

    In a small heavy-bottomed saucepan, bring the milk just to a boil over medium heat. 

    Pour the hot milk over the chocolate, and let it sit for a couple of minutes. 

    Use a spatula or a wooden spoon to stir the mix until smooth. 

    In a small bowl, use a risk or fork to beat the Greek yogurt until smooth. 

    Fold the yogurt into the chocolate mixture using a spatula until thoroughly combined, then stir in the Grand Marnier. 

    Spoon the mousse into four small serving cups, cover with plastic wrap, and chill at least an hour, until firm. They can last up to a day in the refrigerator.

    Spoon a teaspoon of marmalade onto each cup and serve chilled.

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