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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Yeast-free Pizza Crust (Gluten-Free)

    ½ cup cornstarch
    ½ cup rice flour
    2/3 cup milk or milk substitution
    2 eggs
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoons Italian spices
    Dash of garlic powder or salt

    Mix gently, do not over-beat. Pour batter into greased pizza pan. Bake at 425F for 20 minutes.

    For crispier crust, brush top with oil and bake five additional minutes. Add sauce and bake or freeze for future use.

    Option: Cook on top of stove in a small frying pan like a crepe. Use medium-low heat, cook until set, do not brown. Use a 6 pan for kids size.


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    I wasn't able to have pizza for a year (that's when I found out I was allergic to wheat and yeast). I have to say this is SO easy and very yummy! I make it at least once a week :-)

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    Guest Jan McClay-Coles

    Posted

    I was just diagnosed with celiac at age 51 and I've been a little depressed until I read this article - there is hope and it can taste good too!

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    Thank You! After poisoning myself for over a decade, I have finally discovered that I am intolerant to yeast and gluten. The thought of not enjoying a pizza again has been difficult for me. Finding your article and recipe has made me a happy woman! Thanks again!

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    Pretty good crust. Descent texture for being gluten free. I was a little puzzled though when my dough was a liquid. I poured it into a pan, baked about 5 min till it was solid/spongy like. Moved to bigger pan added my topping and finished cooking. This method worked perfectly...

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    When cooking the crust make sure you fill a pizza pan at the oven while on the rack, like a pumpkin pie. Its all liquid so make sure the pan is 12inch and has a small lip on the edge. Also grease the pan very, very well. It's very good. Nice texture and holds shape like pizza should.

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    I decided to try this, since it's a batter, and I've discovered that anything that involves bread is better when made with batter, because it's softer and not as dense.

    It worked great! I had awesome pizza this evening, thanks to you!

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    I am a 31 year old mother of four little ones (1-7 yrs.). Our son was diagnosed with autism two years ago and we began the gluten-free diet then. Since then, our daughter has been diagnosed with Lyme's disease (which we heard people with Lyme's are often gluten intolerant as a result of their disease) so we put her on the same diet. Well, two weeks ago I was diagnosed with celiac, so now I am on the diet as well. Funny how things like that work out. Anyway, our son is also yeast intolerant, so finding this recipe was such a blessing - our family loves pizza! Thank you so much for helping families deal with gluten/yeast intolerance's!

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    this crust tastes just like popovers. I think this same recipe will actually make popovers. I liked it a lot as a pizza crust. It seems really too thin when you pour it in the pan (I used a 9x13 cookie sheet) but it does puff up to a nice thickness. Thanks for the recipe.

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    Made this for a friend cuz I wanted to give her homemade pizza as a Christmas gift. She can't have corn, gluten, yeast or dairy so I substituted arrowroot for the cornstarch, unsweetened almond milk for the liquid and added a tablespoon of olive oil to the batter. It came out great especially compared to the commercial pizza crusts out there. I'm gluten intolerant myself so I've tried my fair share of them. After I cooked it, I took the crust out of the pan, put it on a wire cooling rack, added the toppings and put the rack/crust back in the oven so it would be crispy vs bready. The finishing touch was some fresh basil on top. Had some left over toppings so I whipped up a batch so I could taste the crust/pizza myself. I'm so impressed with how quickly it can be made as well as the flavor. Thank you!!

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    Made this for my housemate who can't have gluten, yeast, or sugar. I thought, "Surely this will be like putting cheese and sauce on a cardboard sheet," but no. This recipe produces a crust with a great texture, and great flavor.

     

    My housemate and I both thank you.

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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