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    Gluten-Free Salted Cod and Potatoes


    Jefferson Adams
    • This delightful dish blends milk, garlic, and herbs to turn simple cod filets into a big, gluten-free hit for supper.

    Gluten-Free Salted Cod and Potatoes
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Eugene Kim

    Celiac.com 09/04/2018 - Want a tasty, simple, reasonably quick gluten-free dinner that is sure to satisfy? This recipe for salted cod and smashed potatoes is just the ticket. Add some arugula with a delightful vinaigrette, and you're home free.

    This recipe pairs smashed potatoes with slated cod, milk, garlic, and herbs for a big, gluten-free suppertime hit.

    Ingredients:

    • 4 cod fillets, 4-6 ounces each
    • 1½ cups whole milk
    • 2 shallots, sliced
    • 1½ teaspoons salt
    • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
    • 2 bay leaves
    • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
    • 1 pound red baby potatoes
    • 2 tablespoons salted butter
    • ¼ cup chives
    • 1 ounce arugula
    • pinch of salt
    • pinch of cracked black pepper
    • 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil

    Tomato and thyme vinaigrette:

    • 5 ounces plum tomatoes
    • ½ teaspoon thyme
    • 1½ cups tomato juice
    • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
    • 2 pinches of salt
    • 1 pinch of cracked black pepper

    Directions:
    For the vinaigrette, add all the ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth. 

    Strain, and season to taste, and put aside.

    Rub the cod fillets with salt and set aside for 25 minutes. 

    Place the potatoes in a pot, bring to a simmer and cook until tender. 

    When potatoes are done, drain away the water, and place potatoes in a bowl. 

    While still warm, crush the potatoes in the bowl, add the melted butter, salt, and the chopped chives.

    Run cod under cold water to rinse all the salt off. 

    Place cod in a large saucepan with the cold milk, thyme, crushed garlic, sliced shallots and bay leaves.

    Bring to a simmer, cook for four minutes, remove and place on plate for serving.

    Place the potato just off the middle of the plate, place the cod on top and spoon over the dressing. 

    Dress the rocket with the olive oil, salt and pepper, and add place beside the cod. 

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    English-style fish and chips are one of my all-time favorites. One of the dishes I've missed the most ever since going gluten-free. I've been discovering new uses for Rice Chex as a gluten-free breading, and this recipe for gluten-free fish and chips is one of the results. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.
    Ingredients:
    1½ quarts vegetable oil, for frying
    2 pounds halibut or firm white fish, cut in  portions
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper
    ½ cup potato starch
    ½ cup tapioca flour
    1 cup rice flour
    2 cups crushed Rice Chex
    1 quart egg wash (equal parts whole eggs and milk, mixed well)
    6 lemons halves, for serving
    Directions:
    Heat the oil in to 375 degrees F. in a Dutch oven or deep frying pot.
    Rinse fish and dab dry with paper towels. Sprinkle the fish with salt and pepper.
    In a mixing bowl, combine and mix rice flour, tapioca flour and potato starch.
    Dip the fish in flour mixture and shake off any excess.
    Dip the fish into the egg wash and then the powdered Rice Chex. Add more Chex as needed to make sure fish is well-coated.
    Repeat the process with each fillet, then carefully drop the coated fish in the fryer.
    Cook the fish in batches until golden brown on both sides, 6 to 7 minutes. Remove from the fryer and place on paper towels to drain excess oil. Serve lemons on the side.
    Serve with chips and tartar sauce.
    English-style Chips:
    Ingredients:
    4 large russet potatoes
    Directions:
    Heat 3-inches of the oil in a deep fryer to 325 degrees F.
    Peel the potatoes and cut them into chips, about the size of your index finger. Put the potatoes in the oil. Fry the chips for 2 to 3 minutes; they should not be crisp or fully cooked at this point. Remove the chips with a spider strainer or slotted spoon, to a paper towel-lined platter to drain.
    Raise oil temperature to 375 degrees F.
    Carefully put the chips in the hot oil. and cook for 4 to 5 minutes until crispy and brown.
    Note:
    I like to do the first part of the chips first, then cook the fish, then finish the chips, as I have a smaller fryer.
    If your fryer is large enough to accommodate both the fish and the chips without lowering the temperature, then you can add the battered fish into the oil on top of the chips, and cook them together. Fry the fish and chips for about 4 to 5 minutes until crispy and brown.


    Jefferson Adams
    Fish tacos have gained a large and growing following over the last few decades. You can find them featured at numerous taquerias and Mexican restaurants. Too often, though, they are coated in batter and so off limits to people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity. After watching so many of my friends writhe in culinary ecstasy as they enjoyed their fish tacos, while I was relegated to standard tacos, I resolved to find a a gluten-free fish taco recipe that I could enjoy; one that would honor the simple roots of the fish taco and bring me the same level of joy as my friends so often enjoy. This simple recipe is makes delicious fish tacos without breaking your budget, or chewing up too much of your time.
    Ingredients:
    1 pound fresh swordfish, halibut or other firm white fish
    1 dozen corn tortillas (3 per person)
    2 Avocados, ripe
    4 Limes, cut into wedges
    Olive oil
    Fresh salsa
    Cabbage
    1 tablespoon cider vinegar
    1 teaspoon salt
    Pepper to taste
    Directions:
    First, get the salsa ready. Either make your own, or choose your favorite salsa from the store.
    Next, slice cabbage into thin strips and place in a small serving bowl. Sprinkle with cider vinegar and salt, and mix well.
    Peel the avocado and remove seed. Chop and reserve for later.
    Warm the tortillas, either by heating in a microwave for 20-25 seconds on high heat, on top of a napkin or paper towel to absorb excess moisture.
    Otherwise, heat the tortillas in a pan on medium-high, flipping regularly until warm and soft. Place warm tortillas on a towel and fold to cover.
    Soak the fish fillets in cold water for at least one minute. Pat dry with a paper towel. Heat a large non-stick pan to medium-high heat. Add a couple of teaspoons of cooking oil to pan. Place fish in pan. Cook fish until barely translucent, but do not overcook. When done, remove to a separate plate. Season with salt and pepper.
    Place a tortilla on a plate, add fish, salsa, cabbage, and avocado. Serve with Mexican style rice. Makes four servings. Adjust recipe as necessary.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/01/2016 - If you're looking for an easy, tasty way to serve fish is a great way to go.
    Now, for this dish, you're not looking for the black cod known as Chilean Sea Bass, but for the American version, usually caught in Alaska, that is much more sustainable. So, be sure to talk to your fishmonger if you're not sure.
    Ingredients:
    1 pound Black cod fillets, cut into pieces 1 tablespoon Sugar 1 tablespoon White miso 1 tablespoon Mirin 1 tablespoon Sake 1 large clove garlic, grated 1/2" finger of ginger, grated 3 cloves garlic, minced Directions:
    Mix the sugar, miso, mirin, sake, garlic and ginger in a small bowl.
    Rub this mixture into the cod then cover and refrigerate overnight
    Move the oven rack to the second position from the top and turn the broiler onto the "high" setting.
    Scrape any extra miso off the fillets and place them on a rack on top of a baking sheet, skin side down.
    Put the pan under the broiler and broil until the cod is golden brown on the top side.
    Turn the fillets skin side up, and continue broiling until the skin is lightly charred and crisp.
    If you have thicker fillets, insert a fork into the thickest part of the fillet to see if it's cooked.
    Cook until the meat is opaque and come apart easily. Serve with rice and favorite vegetables.

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-free Fish and Chips
    Celiac.com 05/27/2017 - The folks in Norwich, England know a thing or two about fish and chips. So does Lucy's Chips, which has operated a popular stall on Norwich market for the last 40 years.
    So, many people were likely surprised to see Lucy's suddenly double in size. And likely even more were surprised to see Lucy's offer a gluten-free version of their popular fish and chips, each prepared in separate areas.
    But Lucy's Chips stall is now under new management, which has driven both the expansion, and the introduction of a new menu to to broaden the appeal of their already popular staples.
    Lucy's had already begun frying its chips in vegetable oil to appeal to vegetarians, and their new menu now boasts a range gluten-free items, including gluten-free versions of unusual products, including battered halloumi, toad in the hole and calamari.
    Barclay Gray, 50, from Sprowston, who runs the stall, said: "Before we were just chips and sausages but…we now have loads of different items available at the stall…to cater to vegetarians and gluten intolerant people.
    Mr Gray explained that the recent expansion means that he can fry his fish and gluten-free products separately.
    Even though Lucy's is under new management, says Mr. Gray, "It has been kept in the family. We're just carrying on and improving where we can."
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    Read more at EDP.co.uk

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    • Maureen and Cyclinglady, Of the foods you listed. . .. I would focus on the Chocolate. Chocolate has Tyramine in it and it could/can cause rashes that  might be confused for DH. Sometimes Tyramine get's confused for/in high sulfite foods as triggers. Here is a great overview article on this topic. http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-red-wine-headache-health-0608-20160525-story.html you might also have trouble with headaches if it tyramine is causing you your trouble. People who have trouble Tyramine might also have trouble with consuming cheeses. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2738414/ As for the Milk causing/triggering your DH don't rule Adult onset dairy allergy. While rare it does occur in the literature/research when you search it out. I am including the research here in the hopes it might help you or someone else entitled "Adult onset of cow's milk protein allergy with small‐intestinal mucosal IgE mast cells" https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1398-9995.1996.tb04640.x It is generally thought most of grow out of a Milk Allergy at approx. 3 years old. But for some lucky one (I guess) we never do apparently.  (I speak for my friend on this board JMG).  He found out he was having trouble with dairy as an adult better never realized until about 6 months ago. With delayed onset allergies it is often hard to tell if it (allergen) is effecting us because we might not associate it with our dairy consumption because it might happen a day or two latter. See this WHFoods article about food allergens/sensitivies.  It is very long/exhaustive but it is very helpful if you have time to study it in more detail. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?pfriendly=1&tname=faq&dbid=30 I will quote some key points for your information. Symptoms of Food Allergies "The most common symptoms for food allergies include vomiting, diarrhea, blood in stools, eczema, hives, skin rashes, wheezing and a runny nose. Symptoms can vary depending upon a number of variables including age, the type of allergen (antigen), and the amount of food consumed. It may be difficult to associate the symptoms of an allergic reaction to a particular food because the response time can be highly variable. For example, an allergic response to eating fish will usually occur within minutes after consumption in the form of a rash, hives or asthma or a combination of these symptoms. However, the symptoms of an allergic reaction to cow's milk may be delayed for 24 to 48 hours after consuming the milk; these symptoms may also be low-grade and last for several days. If this does not make diagnosis difficult enough, reactions to foods made from cow's milk may also vary depending on how it was produced and the portion of the milk to which you are allergic. Delayed allergic reactions to foods are difficult to identify without eliminating the food from your diet for at least several weeks and slowly reintroducing it while taking note of any physical, emotional or mental changes as it is being reintroduced." Here is their information on Tyramine's. Tyramine "Reactions to tyramine (an amino acid-like molecule) or phenylalanine (another amino acid-like molecule) can result from eating the following foods: Fermented cheeses Fermented Sausage Chocolate Sour Cream Red wine Avocado Beer Raspberries Yeast Picked Herring Symptoms of tyramine intolerance can include urticaria (hives), angioedema (localized swelling due to fluid retention), migraines, wheezing, and even asthma. In fact, some researchers suggest that as many as 20 percent of migraines are caused by food intolerance or allergy, and tyramine intolerance is one of the most common of these toxic food responses." Here is an old thread on tyramine and especially how it can trigger headaches. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/95457-headache-culprit-is-tyramine/ I would also suggest your research a low histamine food diet.  Rashes/hives etc. can be triggered my disregulaton of histamine in the body. The other thing in chocolate that might be causing your problems is Sulfites. Here is a website dedicated to a Sulftie allergy. http://www.allergy-details.com/sulfites/foods-contain-sulfites/ Chocolate bars are on their list of sulfite contaning foods but probably most noted in dried fruits and red wine. Knitty Kitty on this board knows alot about a sulfite allergy. I want to go back to the possible dairy allergy for a second as a possible trigger. . .because it has been established as connected to DH . . .it is just not well known. Here is current research (as I said earlier) most dairy allergies are studied in children but it does occur in approx. 10 pct of the GP unless your of Asian descent where it is much more common. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29555204 quoting the new research from this year on children. "When CMP (Cow's Milk Protein) was re-introduced, anti-tTG increased, and returned to normal after the CMP was withdrawn again." and if adults can also (though rarely) it seem develop "Adult onset of cow's milk protein allergy with small‐intestinal mucosal IgE mast cells" (see research linked above) as the research shows  you should at least trial removing dairy from your diet if you haven't already and see if your DH doesn't come back when you re-introduce it. It just takes 15 or 20 years for medical doctor' to incorporate new research/thinking into clinical practice.  And note the research on this happening in adults is 20+ years old and as far I know doctor's . . . are not aware of this.  I know I wasn't until recently and I research things alot of to help myself and my friends. But I know you can't do what you don't know about.  So this is why I am trying to share what I learned so that other might be helped and this research might not  lay hidden another 20 years before doctor's and their Celiac/DH patients become aware of it. And if it helps you come back on the board and let us know so it can help others too! If it helps you it will/can help someone else! if they know it helped you then they will/can have hope it might help them too and why I share and research these things for others'. . . who don't know or don't have time to research this for themselves. I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice. Good luck on your continued journey. I know this is a lot of information to digest at one time but I hope at least some of if it helpful and you at least have a better idea of what in your chocolate could be causing your DH (idiopathic) as the doctor's say (of an unknown cause mild) DH symptom's. Or at least it is not commonly known yet that Milk can also cause trigger (DH) in children and adults who have a Milk allergy undiagnosed. . .because we don't don't typically think  or associate it with adults like maybe we should if we are not of Asian descent. Maureen if this doesn't help you you might want to start a thread in the DH section of the forum. As always  2 Timothy 2: 7   “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included. Posterboy by the grace of God,
    • I hooe you can get some answers with your new GI doc.
    • Many of us deal with doctor issues and diagnosis, you got a really bad draw indeed. Most doctors dismiss Celiac as their is no money in the cure for them IE a gluten free diet and not medications.

      Keep up updated on your new doctor and testing, good to see you finally found one that listens and can help, I got through on doc #5 I think it was.
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