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    Roasted Paprika Chicken (Gluten-Free)


    Jefferson Adams


    • Paprika makes a great seasoning for this tasty gluten-free chicken dish.


    Image Caption: Paprika chicken makes a great gluten-free entree. Photo: CC--Marsha Maxwell

    Celiac.com 11/29/2016 - Paprika is great. Roasted chicken is great. Roasted paprika chicken is exponentially great. This recipe makes a terrific dinner entrée, and goes great over rice.


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    Ingredients: 

    • 8 skinless, boneless chicken thighs
    • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
    • 1 tablespoon sweet smoked paprika
    • About 1½ teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
    • About 1 teaspoon hot sauce
    • About 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for drizzling
    • 2 tablespoons butter
    • 1 large clove garlic, grated or finely chopped
    • 1 shallot, finely chopped
    • ¼ cup chopped flat leaf parsley
    • Salt and pepper

    Directions:
    Wash rice and put on the stove to cook. 

    While the rice is cooking, place the tomato paste in a small bowl and stir in ¼ cup of the boiling pasta water. Stir in the paprika, Worcestershire and hot sauce.

    Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat.

    Drizzle the chicken thighs with olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and add to the skillet.

    Cook until browned on the bottom, about 5 minutes.

    Flip and baste liberally with the paprika paste.

    Brown the other side, about 5 minutes longer, then flip again and brush with more of the paprika paste.

    In a large skillet, add about 1 tablespoon olive oil and the butter to melt over medium heat.

    Add the garlic and shallot, and cook for 3 minutes.

    Serve chicken thighs each over rice.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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