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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    This recipe comes to us from Jonathan Hammer. Follow standard beer brewing procedures with respect to sterilization and fermentation.
    Recipe Per 1 gallon product:
    1 pound buckwheat honey
    1/3 ounce Challenger Hops
    Yeast nutrient
    Water to make 1 gallon
    Ale Yeast
    Reserve small amount of hops. Boil honey, water, and bulk of hops for 30 minutes. Add reserved hops and boil for another 5 minutes. Strain off the hops. Cool to room temperature. Add yeast nutrient as per package directions. Transfer wort to glass carboy. Prepare yeast as per package directions and add.
    Fermentation can last up to 6 weeks.
    When fermentation is complete, siphon into another glass carboy and store in a cool location for clarification (about 2 more weeks).
    Siphon off clarified brew into a pot and add ¼ cup dissolved Dextrose (corn sugar primer) per gallon. Bottle immediately. Age for another 2 weeks or until tired of waiting and drink (hopefully not all at once, but celebration is appropriate at this point). Note that some additional clarification may take place; sediment will gather in the bottom of the bottles. Also, this stuff definitely improves with age.
    I think the secret to getting a flavorful beer is in using buckwheat honey which is very dark and rich, and a fairly strong flavored hops. This is to my taste. Other combinations of honey and hops, however, will yield different tastes. I understand that there are about 300 different types of honey available and who knows how many different types of hops, so an infinite variety of different tasting honey-based ales can be made. Well, maybe not infinite, but at least there are enough combinations to keep someone drunk for a few hundred years trying to test them all.
    Honey suppliers in the US may be found from the national honey boards web site at http://www.nhb.org. It is interesting to note that in northern Europe and England honey based ales were brewed well before knowledge of malting barley made its way north from the middle east. The reformation probably played a major role in England in the demise of mead and honey-ales (Protestants did not need as many candles as Catholics, less bees were kept, and consequently the price of honey soared). The availability of cheap barley malt and cheap imported French wines probably sealed the fate of mead and honey-ales, along with their numerous variations.
    Aside from finding a gluten-free beer, I have enjoyed researching the history of beer, wine, and mead.

    Wendy Cohan
    Before I went gluten-free, cous-cous salad was one of my all-time favorites, and I made it often. Cous-Cous is not a grain itself, but a tiny grain-like semolina pasta common in the Middle-Eastern/North African countries, and of course it contains gluten. Now I have re-created three salad recipes using a naturally gluten-free grain called Quinoa (pronounced “keenwa”). This unique grain, or seed, which was a staple food of the Incas in South America due to its stellar nutritional profile, comes in two varieties – plain, and the earthier “Inca Red”.
    These lively whole-grain salads are easy to prepare for guests, potlucks, and picnics. They keep well, and can be ready in minutes. I usually make the Middle-Eastern version, but sometimes a meal like grilled lamb-chops or herb-roasted chicken works better with the Mediterranean version. The Mediterranean version is also great to make in the summer when fresh herbs and local tomatoes are in season. When fresh corn is in season, I love to make the version with corn and beans, highlighted by red onion and a zip of lime.
    You simply toss all ingredients together with the quinoa, then with the dressing. Taste and adjust seasoning. Chill salad in refrigerator briefly. Salad can be “refreshed” the next day by adding a small amount of fresh lemon juice or vinegar, and lightly tossing. Enjoy the taste of a wholesome nutritious grain that is safe for anyone with gluten sensitivity, yet easily available in your natural foods market.
    Quinoa is very adaptable, and you may find yourself coming up with new versions. I’ve tasted quinoa salads with edemame, and bay shrimp, or nori, ginger and dark sesame oil. I can even imagine a quinoa salad with winter squash, walnuts, chopped parsley and sweet onions, and diced apples, using apple cider vinegar and walnut oil. You’ll come up with the best results by making use of locally grown fruits and vegetables in season. Now I can’t wait for those summer tomatoes and corn from my garden!
    Cook ¾ cup prepared quinoa in 1 ½ cup water, ½ tsp. salt, and 1 TBSP. olive oil until thin ring around seed is visible and grain is tender but not mushy. Drain off any excess water thoroughly. Gently fluff with fork and allow to cool briefly while assembling remaining ingredients. Combine quinoa with the remaining ingredients in whichever recipe you choose.
    Middle-Eastern Style:
    ½ cup each:
    Thinly sliced quartered carrots
    Dried (Zante) currants
    Sliced green onions/scallions
    Finely chopped parsley
    Sliced almonds, lightly toasted
    Dressing:
    2 TBSP. Apple Cider Vinegar
    1 TBSP. freshly squeezed lemon juice or orange juice
    ¼ cup canola or walnut oil, or light, mild tasting olive oil
    1 clove garlic, finely minced or use a garlic press
    1 TBSP. honey
    1/8 teaspoon curry powder + 1/8 teaspoon cloves
    ¼ tsp sea salt
    Mediterranean Style:
    1/2 cup each:
    Thinly sliced diced seeded cucumbers
    Chopped kalamata olives
    Sliced green onions/scallions or red onion
    Diced tomatoes, or halved cherry tomatoes
    Crumbled sheep-feta cheese (optional)
    Pine nuts, toasted (optional garnish)
    Dressing:
    2 TBSP. Red Wine Vinegar
    1 TBSP. freshly squeezed lemon juice
    ¼ cup olive oil
    2 teaspoons honey
    1 teaspoon g.f. Dijon mustard
    1 clove garlic, finely minced, or use a garlic press
    ¼ teaspoon dried Italian seasoning, or pinch each ½ teaspoon garam masala, or dried marjoram & oregano
    ¼ teaspoon sea salt
    Dash freshly ground black pepper
    South of the Border Style:
    ¾ cup canned or fresh cooked small red beans or black beans
    ¾ cup frozen sweet white corn kernels, or an equivalent amount of freshly grilled sweet corn kernels cut off the cob
    ¼ cup finely diced red onion
    ¼ cup finely chopped cilantro (or substitute fresh basil in season)
    ½ cup diced fresh tomato (optional)
    Dressing:
    ¼ cup each freshly squeezed lime juice
    1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    ¼ teaspoon cumin
    ½ teaspoon sea salt
    ¼ teaspoon black pepper
    Sprinkle of crushed red pepper flakes (to taste, optional)
    Finely chopped parsley, mint & parsley, or parsley & basil


    Jefferson Adams
    Oh, Chicken, how can I prepare thee? Let me count the ways. This is a great, quick spin on everyday chicken thighs and can easily spice up an ordinary middle-of-the-week dinner. The combination of spices is potent and aromatic but the real kick comes from the cider vinegar. I’ve played around with different combinations and quantities of spices depending on which flavor I want to highlight—that’s the fun part. Thighs are great over brown rice, on a salad, with veggies, in tacos or even on their own. Thighs also cook great on the grill in the summertime.
    Ingredients:
    8 skinless, boneless chicken thighs
    6 tablespoons honey
    3 teaspoons cider vinegar
    2 teaspoons garlic powder
    2 teaspoons chili powder
    2 teaspoons paprika
    2 teaspoons black pepper
    1 teaspoon ground cumin
    1 teaspoon ginger
    1 teaspoon ground red pepper
    1 teaspoon salt
    Directions
    In a small bowl, mix honey and cider vinegar and set aside.
    Combine all spices in medium a bowl and mix well. Add in chicken thighs and work until well coated with spice mixture. Place thighs on a broiler pan and broil for 5-6 minutes on each side.
    After chicken in fully cooked, remove from over and brush half of the honey glaze over thighs. Cook for another minute and repeat with the reverse side of the chicken. Serve with you favorite side dish. Thighs are great the next day.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/30/2014 - Pork tenderloin is a versatile favorite. This recipe for marinated pork tenderloin makes a tasty, grilled version that is gluten-free and ready to please.
    Ingredients:
    2 (¾ pound) pork tenderloins ¼ cup balsamic vinegar ¼ cup gluten-free soy sauce ¼ cup packed brown sugar 1½ teaspoons onion powder 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon black pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil Place soy sauce, brown sugar, sherry, dried onion, cinnamon, garlic powder, black pepper and olive oil in a large resealable plastic bag. Seal, and shake to mix.
    Place pork in bag with marinade, seal, and refrigerate for 6 to 12 hours.
    Heat grill for high heat.
    Lightly oil grill grate.
    Place tenderloins on a lightly oiled grill, and discard marinade.
    Cook 20 minutes, or to desired doneness.
    Slice into medallions, and serve.

  • Recent Articles

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years
    between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its coeliac disease, a sensitivity to the
    protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When
    you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible.
    As awareness of coeliac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities
    are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the
    list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the
    top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of
    gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city.
    The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture
    rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included.
    Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list,
    including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts
    the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge
    330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their
    variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this
    list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe
    eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:

     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com