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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    CONNIE SARROS' GREEK BURGER PATTIES


    Connie Sarros

    This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2003 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.


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    Celiac.com 09/18/2014 - Right now, it is considered the “in” thing to be on a low carbohydrate diet.  Dr. Atkins has become a household word.  Try this great low carb recipe for your gluten-free and low carb diet.

    Dairy-free:  Omit the cheese.
    Vegetarian:  Substitute crumbled gluten-free veggie burgers for the lamb.
    Vegan:  Substitute crumbled gluten-free veggie burgers for the lamb.  Omit the cheese.

    Photo: CC--Don LaVangeIngredients:

    • 3 green onions, sliced
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
    • ¾ lb. ground lamb
    • 2 teaspoons oregano
    • ½ teaspoon cumin
    • ½ teaspoon dill
    • ½ teaspoon mint
    • ¼ teaspoon pepper
    • 2 Tablespoons parsley, chopped
    • 1 tomato, minced
    • 3 Tablespoons low-salt feta cheese, crumbled
    • 2 teaspoons lemon juice

    Directions:
    In a small pan, sauté onions and garlic in oil over medium heat until tender but not browned; transfer to a medium bowl.  Add remaining ingredients to bowl and mix well.  Form into 4 patties.  Grill or broil patties about 4 minutes per side or until cooked through.  Serves 4.

    Calories: 305; Total fat: 25g; Saturated fat: 10.1g; Cholesterol: 68.1mg; Sodium: 135.6mg; Carbohydrates: 4.4g; Fiber: 0.7g; Sugar: 1.1g; Protein: 15.7



    Image Caption: Photo: CC--Don LaVange
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    Jules Shepard
    Ingredients:
    ½ cup granulated cane sugar
    ½ cup butter or Earth Balance Buttery Sticks (dairy-free & vegan) or Earth Balance Buttery Spread (dairy-free and soy-free & vegan) at room temperature
    ½ cup vanilla yogurt (dairy or soy, coconut or rice)
    1 cup unsweetened applesauce
    2 large eggs (or egg substitute (Ener-G) works great)
    2 cups Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour*
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    2 teaspoons gluten-free baking powder
    2 tablespoons (heaping) flax seed meal
    ¼ cup certified gluten-free oats
    1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon. nutmeg
    ½ cup baking raisins
    cinnamon-sugar mixture for the tops
    extra oats for the tops
    *(The recipe for my homemade all purpose gluten-free flour blend is in my books, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating, and The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten-Free.  You may also find it on my Web site)
    Directions:
    Preheat the oven to 350 F (static) 325 F (convection)
    Oil or line muffin cups and set aside (makes approximately 15 regular sized muffins or 48 mini-muffins)
    Combine the sugar and butter in a large mixing bowl, beating until fluffy. Add in the eggs or egg substitute, applesauce and yogurt, and mix well.
    In a separate bowl, whisk together all the dry ingredients. Gradually add them into the wet ingredients and beat until incorporated. Stir in the raisins last.
    Fill muffin cups to 2/3 full and then sprinkle cinnamon-sugar and additional oats on top.
    Bake for approximately 20 minutes for mini-muffins, 25-30 minutes for regular sized muffins. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely...Enjoy!


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/11/2010 - The holidays are upon us, once again, and that means it's time toremind folks that a little planning and preparation will help anyonewith celiac disease or gluten intolerance to enjoy a safe, deliciousgluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday season without worrying aboutinadvertently eating wheat or gluten.

    For folks cooking a gluten-free turkey dinner at home, here are some helpful tips to make things easier:

    First, make sure the turkey you plan to serve for your gluten-freeholiday dinner is, in fact, a gluten-free turkey. This is notautomatically true. Many brands of turkey are processed with addedgluten—so, don't assume, and make sure to check the ingredients list.Celiac.com offers a pretty comprehensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make yourgluten-free shopping easier. Second, make sure that any stuffing you serve is gluten-free! Accept nosubstitute. There's no need to risk putting gluten-based stuffing inyour turkey. You can astound and delight all your guests withceliac.com's delicious Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe (below). Third, prepare a simple, delicious gluten-free gravy using Celiac.com'sThanksgiving Holiday Gluten-Free Turkey Gravy recipe, or your favorite gluten-freegravy mix. Note: Be careful, many bouillon cubes contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes.  Tip: Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour.
    Prepare easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes by browsing Celiac.com'sextensive listing of gluten-free recipes, where you will find sidedishes to impress even the snootiest gourmet.

    Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items likeprepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allowyou to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending allof your time in the kitchen!

    Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered anddelivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall, and your purchases there actually directly support Celiac.com.

    Here are some helpful holiday tips and information for anyone planning to dine out, or at a friend or relative's house:
    Ali Demeritte's blog entry: The Dinner Party Drama—Two Guidelines to Assure a Pleasant Gluten-Free Experience. Danna Korn's article: Venturing Out of the House: Restaurant Realities. Aimee Eiguren's blog entry: Eating Out Gluten-Free and Without Fear. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free at Restaurants. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free Meals at Small or Moving Restaurants. Celiac.com's Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe
    Ingredients:
    5-6 cups white, gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    3 cups celery, chopped
    2 shallots, minced
    1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, chopped
    1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced
    1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced
    1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced
    1-1½ cups gluten-free chicken broth
    ½ cup white wine
    1 egg yolk
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon pepper
    Bits of cooked sausage or bacon, diced chestnut, pecan, apple,cranberry, currant, or raisin (optional) *Make sure any sausage isgluten-free!

    Preparation:
    Sauté shallots, onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent.

    Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or twominutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Add wine andcontinue cooking over medium heat until liquid is reduced by half.Remove from heat and allow to cool.

    Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Note: If cooking stuffing inside turkey, add just 1 cup of chicken broth.

    Place the egg yolk in a large bowl and carefully spoon two or threeounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whiskingthe mixture.

    Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Make sure toblend a small amount of stock into the egg first to prevent scrambledeggs.

    Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and eggmixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly.Add the salt and pepper and mix.

    Place the stuffing mixture into a greased casserole dish and cook  in400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, untildone.

    Note: The stuffing is done when you can insert a toothpick into thestuffing and it comes out clean. Make sure you bake stuffing until thetoothpick comes out clean.

    Serves about six to eight people.

    Suggestion: Add finely diced cooked sausage or bacon bits to thesautéed vegetables, or toss in bits of diced chestnut, pecan, apple,cranberry, currant, or raisin. *Make sure any sausage is gluten-free!
    Gluten-free Classics: Holiday Pumpkin Pie
    Ingredients:
    ¾ cup granulated sugar
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon ground ginger
    ¼ teaspoon ground clove
    2 large eggs (Duck eggs work great!)
    1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!)
    1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk (Delicious with evaporated goat's milk!)
    1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) gluten-free pie shell
    Whipped cream (optional)

    Directions:
    Mix sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggsin large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stirin evaporated milk.

    Pour into gluten-free pie shell.

    Bake in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near centercomes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately orrefrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving.

    *Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe

    Jefferson Adams
    Stuffing is standard fare at just about every Thanksgiving or holiday meal that involves a bird. This recipe will help those with gluten-sensitivities to keep the stuffing right there on the plate next to the turkey. Served with mashed potatoes, gluten-free gravy, and maybe a little cranberry sauce, and you've got the makings of a great gluten-free holiday!
    Ingredients:
    5-6 cups white, gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    3 cups celery, chopped
    2 shallots, minced
    1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, chopped
    1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced
    1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced
    1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced
    1-1½ cups gluten-free chicken broth
    ½ cup white wine
    1 egg yolk
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon pepper
    Bits of cooked sausage or bacon, diced chestnut, pecan, apple, cranberry, currant, or raisin (optional) *Make sure any sausage is gluten-free!
    Preparation:
    Sauté shallots, onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent.
    Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or two minutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Add wine and continue cooking over medium heat until liquid is reduced by half. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
    Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Note: If cooking stuffing inside turkey, add just 1 cup of chicken broth.
    Place the egg yolk in a large bowl and carefully spoon two or three ounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whisking the mixture.
    Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Make sure to blend a small amount of stock into the egg first to prevent scrambled eggs.
    Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and egg mixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly. Add the salt and pepper and mix.
    Place the stuffing mixture into a greased casserole dish and cook  in 400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, until done.
    Note: The stuffing is done when you can insert a toothpick into the stuffing and it comes out clean. Make sure you bake stuffing until the toothpick comes out clean.
    Serves about six to eight people. Scale recipe according to amount of stuffing required.
    Suggestion: Add finely diced cooked sausage or bacon bits to the sautéed vegetables, or toss in bits of diced chestnut, pecan, apple, cranberry, currant, or raisins.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/22/2012 - Thanksgiving is upon us once again, and celiac.com is again offering gluten-free information, tips and recipes to help make your gluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday celebrations a smooth and delicious success!
    If you are planning a gluten-free turkey dinner at home, these helpful tips will make your work easier:
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    Roasted Garlic Chive Mashed Potatoes
    Ingredients:
    5 large russet potatoes (about 4½ pounds), peeled and cut into chunks
    1 head of garlic (8-10 cloves), roasted
    1 cup fresh cream, warmed
    ¾ cup (1½ sticks) butter, room temperature
    1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme
    1 tablespoon finely chopped chives
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper
    Directions:
    Use a knife to cut off 1/4 to a 1/2 inch of the top of cloves, exposing the individual cloves of garlic. Drizzle lightly with olive oil, and wrap in foil. Place in oven at 400 degrees F, and roast for about 30 minutes, until cloves are soft.
    While garlic is roasting, wash and peel potatoes and cut into 6 chunks each.
    Add 1 teaspoon of salt to a large pot of water, add potatoes and boil until the potatoes are soft (about 25-30 minutes).
    When garlic is soft, remove from oven and allow to cool slightly. Once cool, place garlic on a plate and use a wooden spoon to squeeze roasted garlic out of the clove.
    When potatoes are done, strain them into a colander and let stand for 5 minutes to allow them to steam dry over the pot they were cooked in.
    Mash the potatoes.
    Stir in the cream, butter, roasted garlic, thyme and chives, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.
    For a sure-fire dessert hit, serve up some Classic Gluten-free Holiday Pumpkin Pie.
    Round out your gluten-free dinner with gluten-free side dishes from Celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes. Meanwhile, be sure to check out these other gluten-free Thanksgiving recipes that will help make your holiday dinner a success:
    Spiced Pumpkin Soup Red Pepper Pumpkin Seeds Cranberry Sauce with Ginger and Raisins (Gluten-Free) Roasted Acorn Squash (Gluten-Free) Butternut Squash Soup with Apples (Gluten-Free) Baked Apples (Gluten-Free) In addition to our ever-popular recipe for Classic Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie, we offer this delicious recipe for gluten-free Ginger Crust Pumpkin Pie.
    Whether you plan on dining at home, dining out, or dining at a friend or relative's house, check these web sites for helpful gluten-free tips and information:
    Ali Demeritte's blog entry: The Dinner Party Drama—Two Guidelines to Assure a Pleasant Gluten-Free Experience. Danna Korn's article: Venturing Out of the House: Restaurant Realities. Aimee Eiguren's blog entry: Eating Out Gluten-Free and Without Fear. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free at Restaurants. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free Meals at Small or Moving Restaurants. HuffingtonPost Gluten-free Goddess Pinterest PNW Local News

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    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.