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    Gluten-Free Chicken with Lemon Sauce and Capers


    Jefferson Adams
    • This delightful dish blends tangy lemon, salty capers and spices to turn ordinary chicken breasts into a big, gluten-free hit for supper.

    Gluten-Free Chicken with Lemon Sauce and Capers
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Annabelle Orozco

    Celiac.com 08/18/2018 - This happy marriage of tangy lemon, salty capers and spices turn ordinary chicken breasts into an extraordinary entree. Easy to make and sure to appeal to even picky eaters, this creamy, tangy recipe will take your chicken from seven to eleven in no time.

    Ingredients:

    • 4 chicken cutlets
    • 1½ cups chicken broth
    • 5 tablespoons potato starch
    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 3 tablespoons capers
    • 4 cloves garlic, minced
    • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
    • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
    • 1 teaspoon lemon pepper
    • 1 splash heavy cream
    • Zest and juice of 1 lemon
    • Parsley, for garnish, as desired

    Directions:
    On a plate, combine kosher salt, pepper, lemon pepper and 2 tablespoons of potato starch. 

    Cover the chicken cutlets in potato starch mixture and place on a separate plate. 

    Sprinkle half of the lemon zest over the cutlets and gently pat it on.

    Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. 

    Brown chicken until cooked through, about 3-4 minutes on each side. 

    Move browned cutlets to a fresh plate.

    In a bowl, whisk lemon juice, chicken broth, capers, garlic and remaining zest until smooth. 

    Pour into skillet with drippings and whisk until blended. 

    Add cream, as desired and stir until blended and smooth. 

    Return chicken to pan and heat for about 2 minutes. 

    Serve cutlets on white rice with your favorite vegetables on the side.

    Spoon sauce over cutlets and garnish with parsley, as desired.


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    Guest Sheri

    Posted

    The recipe only accounts for 2 of the 5 TBS of potato starch. Do you make roux with the rest before adding the liquid?

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/05/2014 - Beer can chicken is one of those simple, no fuss grilling options that never fails to draw a smile from guests.
    It’s easy to prepare, easy to cook, and plenty tasty when it’s done right.
    Ingredients:
    1 whole chicken (about 3 pounds) ½ cup brown sugar 3 tablespoons paprika 3 teaspoons dry mustard 1 tablespoons chili powder 1 tablespoon garlic powder 1 tablespoon onion powder 2 teaspoons lemon pepper 1 teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper ½ (12 fluid ounce) can gluten-free beer (If your gluten-free beer comes in a bottle, rinse an empty soda can and fill it half way with gluten-free beer) Directions:
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    Place the half-full can of beer in a small oven-proof baking dish.
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    Fortunately, sesame chicken is pretty easy to make. Here's a recipe for delicious gluten-free sesame chicken that comes together easily, and will have your guests smiling.
    Ingredients:
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    Cook until seared and golden on one side, then turn and cook until golden again, about 2-3 minutes. Remove chicken onto a paper towel as it finishes cooking.
    Pour chicken stock mixture over top and toss to coat, then turn off heat.
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    Gluten-free Chicken Francese
    Celiac.com 05/03/2017 - If you're looking for a rich, decadent dinner entree that also happens to be gluten-free, then look no further. This recipe for chicken Francese, that's Italian for "chicken in the French style," delivers a rich, flavorful entree that is sure to leave a trail of smiles and empty plates.
    Ingredients:
    2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, filet thinly to create 2 to 3 breasts servings 1cup very condensed chicken broth ¼ cup white wine juice of 1 lemon 3 eggs grated parmesan cheese 2 garlic cloves, crushed parsley ½ cup unsalted butter potato starch, for dredging White rice, or gluten-free pasta Directions:
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    Dust chicken with potato starch.
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    Add broth and butter, and cook until butter melts.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-Free Chicken with Lemon Sauce and Capers
    Celiac.com 08/18/2018 - This happy marriage of tangy lemon, salty capers and spices turn ordinary chicken breasts into an extraordinary entree. Easy to make and sure to appeal to even picky eaters, this creamy, tangy recipe will take your chicken from seven to eleven in no time.
    Ingredients:
    4 chicken cutlets 1½ cups chicken broth 5 tablespoons potato starch 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons capers 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 teaspoon lemon pepper 1 splash heavy cream Zest and juice of 1 lemon Parsley, for garnish, as desired Directions:
    On a plate, combine kosher salt, pepper, lemon pepper and 2 tablespoons of potato starch. 
    Cover the chicken cutlets in potato starch mixture and place on a separate plate. 
    Sprinkle half of the lemon zest over the cutlets and gently pat it on.
    Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. 
    Brown chicken until cooked through, about 3-4 minutes on each side. 
    Move browned cutlets to a fresh plate.
    In a bowl, whisk lemon juice, chicken broth, capers, garlic and remaining zest until smooth. 
    Pour into skillet with drippings and whisk until blended. 
    Add cream, as desired and stir until blended and smooth. 
    Return chicken to pan and heat for about 2 minutes. 
    Serve cutlets on white rice with your favorite vegetables on the side.
    Spoon sauce over cutlets and garnish with parsley, as desired.

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    • Maureen and Cyclinglady, Of the foods you listed. . .. I would focus on the Chocolate. Chocolate has Tyramine in it and it could/can cause rashes that  might be confused for DH. Sometimes Tyramine get's confused for/in high sulfite foods as triggers. Here is a great overview article on this topic. http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-red-wine-headache-health-0608-20160525-story.html you might also have trouble with headaches if it tyramine is causing you your trouble. People who have trouble Tyramine might also have trouble with consuming cheeses. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2738414/ As for the Milk causing/triggering your DH don't rule Adult onset dairy allergy. While rare it does occur in the literature/research when you search it out. I am including the research here in the hopes it might help you or someone else entitled "Adult onset of cow's milk protein allergy with small‐intestinal mucosal IgE mast cells" https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1398-9995.1996.tb04640.x It is generally thought most of grow out of a Milk Allergy at approx. 3 years old. But for some lucky one (I guess) we never do apparently.  (I speak for my friend on this board JMG).  He found out he was having trouble with dairy as an adult better never realized until about 6 months ago. With delayed onset allergies it is often hard to tell if it (allergen) is effecting us because we might not associate it with our dairy consumption because it might happen a day or two latter. See this WHFoods article about food allergens/sensitivies.  It is very long/exhaustive but it is very helpful if you have time to study it in more detail. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?pfriendly=1&tname=faq&dbid=30 I will quote some key points for your information. Symptoms of Food Allergies "The most common symptoms for food allergies include vomiting, diarrhea, blood in stools, eczema, hives, skin rashes, wheezing and a runny nose. Symptoms can vary depending upon a number of variables including age, the type of allergen (antigen), and the amount of food consumed. It may be difficult to associate the symptoms of an allergic reaction to a particular food because the response time can be highly variable. For example, an allergic response to eating fish will usually occur within minutes after consumption in the form of a rash, hives or asthma or a combination of these symptoms. However, the symptoms of an allergic reaction to cow's milk may be delayed for 24 to 48 hours after consuming the milk; these symptoms may also be low-grade and last for several days. If this does not make diagnosis difficult enough, reactions to foods made from cow's milk may also vary depending on how it was produced and the portion of the milk to which you are allergic. Delayed allergic reactions to foods are difficult to identify without eliminating the food from your diet for at least several weeks and slowly reintroducing it while taking note of any physical, emotional or mental changes as it is being reintroduced." Here is their information on Tyramine's. Tyramine "Reactions to tyramine (an amino acid-like molecule) or phenylalanine (another amino acid-like molecule) can result from eating the following foods: Fermented cheeses Fermented Sausage Chocolate Sour Cream Red wine Avocado Beer Raspberries Yeast Picked Herring Symptoms of tyramine intolerance can include urticaria (hives), angioedema (localized swelling due to fluid retention), migraines, wheezing, and even asthma. In fact, some researchers suggest that as many as 20 percent of migraines are caused by food intolerance or allergy, and tyramine intolerance is one of the most common of these toxic food responses." Here is an old thread on tyramine and especially how it can trigger headaches. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/95457-headache-culprit-is-tyramine/ I would also suggest your research a low histamine food diet.  Rashes/hives etc. can be triggered my disregulaton of histamine in the body. The other thing in chocolate that might be causing your problems is Sulfites. Here is a website dedicated to a Sulftie allergy. http://www.allergy-details.com/sulfites/foods-contain-sulfites/ Chocolate bars are on their list of sulfite contaning foods but probably most noted in dried fruits and red wine. Knitty Kitty on this board knows alot about a sulfite allergy. I want to go back to the possible dairy allergy for a second as a possible trigger. . .because it has been established as connected to DH . . .it is just not well known. Here is current research (as I said earlier) most dairy allergies are studied in children but it does occur in approx. 10 pct of the GP unless your of Asian descent where it is much more common. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29555204 quoting the new research from this year on children. "When CMP (Cow's Milk Protein) was re-introduced, anti-tTG increased, and returned to normal after the CMP was withdrawn again." and if adults can also (though rarely) it seem develop "Adult onset of cow's milk protein allergy with small‐intestinal mucosal IgE mast cells" (see research linked above) as the research shows  you should at least trial removing dairy from your diet if you haven't already and see if your DH doesn't come back when you re-introduce it. It just takes 15 or 20 years for medical doctor' to incorporate new research/thinking into clinical practice.  And note the research on this happening in adults is 20+ years old and as far I know doctor's . . . are not aware of this.  I know I wasn't until recently and I research things alot of to help myself and my friends. But I know you can't do what you don't know about.  So this is why I am trying to share what I learned so that other might be helped and this research might not  lay hidden another 20 years before doctor's and their Celiac/DH patients become aware of it. And if it helps you come back on the board and let us know so it can help others too! If it helps you it will/can help someone else! if they know it helped you then they will/can have hope it might help them too and why I share and research these things for others'. . . who don't know or don't have time to research this for themselves. I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice. Good luck on your continued journey. I know this is a lot of information to digest at one time but I hope at least some of if it helpful and you at least have a better idea of what in your chocolate could be causing your DH (idiopathic) as the doctor's say (of an unknown cause mild) DH symptom's. Or at least it is not commonly known yet that Milk can also cause trigger (DH) in children and adults who have a Milk allergy undiagnosed. . .because we don't don't typically think  or associate it with adults like maybe we should if we are not of Asian descent. Maureen if this doesn't help you you might want to start a thread in the DH section of the forum. As always  2 Timothy 2: 7   “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included. Posterboy by the grace of God,
    • I hooe you can get some answers with your new GI doc.
    • Many of us deal with doctor issues and diagnosis, you got a really bad draw indeed. Most doctors dismiss Celiac as their is no money in the cure for them IE a gluten free diet and not medications.

      Keep up updated on your new doctor and testing, good to see you finally found one that listens and can help, I got through on doc #5 I think it was.
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