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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Creamy Tomato Soup (Gluten-Free)

    Caption: The finished creamy tomato soup. Photo: CC--Ian May

    Celiac.com 12/10/2014 - Creamy tomato soup is a comfort food classic that goes great with a gluten-free grilled cheese sandwich. Alas, some canned versions contain wheat flour.

    This gluten-free tomato soup recipe delivers a rich, creamy tomato soup that will warm your body and make your stomach sing with joy. Perfect for a cold day.

    Photo: CC--Ian MayIngredients:

    • 1 (28-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes in their juices (I use San Marzano)
    • 2 cups chicken broth
    • 1 tablespoon olive oil
    • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
    • 1 medium sweet onion, chopped
    • 2 bay leaves
    • ½ teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
    • ½ cup basil, cut to thin ribbons
    • ½ cup heavy cream

    Directions:
    Heat oil and butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat.

    Once butter foams, add onion and a big pinch of salt and fresh ground pepper.

    Cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is completely soft and just beginning to brown, about 12-15 minutes.

    Add broth, tomatoes and juices to the saucepan and stir to crush up tomatoes. Add bay leaves and heat until bubbly.

    When soup bubbles, season with a little salt and pepper, add thyme and basil, and simmer gently until tomatoes begin to break apart, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

    Remove from heat, discard bay leaves, and allow soup to cool slightly.

    Carefully purée soup in a blender until smooth. Be careful. If you don't have an immersion blender, you may have to do this in batches. I always cover the top with a towel, just to be safe.

    Return soup to the stove over low heat and stir in cream. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired.

    Serve with salad, or vegetables, and your favorite gluten-free grilled cheese sandwich for a delicious meal.


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    Looks great. However, recipe instructs to add cream twice. Perhaps should have said add the spices instead of the first mention of cream.

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    Looks great. However, recipe instructs to add cream twice. Perhaps should have said add the spices instead of the first mention of cream.

    I believe Janice is correct, the cream should be added last - and do not let the soup boil after the cream has been added.

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    Delicious - added a large spoon of sugar to reduce acidity of tomatoes but have already been asked by a non-celiac friend for recipe. Thanks for sharing.

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    Guest Charlotte Gareau

    Posted

    Delicious - added a large spoon of sugar to reduce acidity of tomatoes but have already been asked by a non-celiac friend for recipe. Thanks for sharing.

    Use fresh tomatoes instead of canned. Much better flavor.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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