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    Healing, Nutritious Beef Bone Broth (Gluten-Free)


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 02/11/2015 - Broth is the new black. Read the food magazines and blogs and you will inevitably come upon an article about the benefits of broth. But, unlike so many health foods, broth is not an overhyped fad food.

    Photo: CC--Amber De GraceBroth can be digested by every body, and broth is healthy for everyone.

    For people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance, broth can be part of a diet that promotes healing and wellness of the gut, the immune system, the bones and more.

    From baby to granny and from sickest to healthiest, broth has something for everyone.

    Ingredients:

    • 4 pounds beef marrow and knuckle bones
    • 3 pounds meaty rib or neck bones
    • 4 or more quarts cold filtered water
    • ½ cup cider vinegar
    • 3 onions, coarsely chopped
    • 3 carrots, coarsely chopped
    • 3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
    • several sprigs of fresh thyme, tied together
    • 1 teaspoon dried peppercorns, crushed
    • l bunch flat parsley, chopped

    Directions:
    Place the knuckle and marrow bones into a very large pot with vinegar and cover with water. Let sit for one hour.

    Meanwhile, place the meaty bones in a roasting pan and brown at 350 degrees in the oven.

    When well browned, add to the pot along with the vegetables. Pour the fat out of the roasting pan, add cold water to the pan, set over a high flame and bring to a boil, stirring with a wooden spoon to loosen up coagulated juices.

    Add this liquid to the pot. Top with water, if needed, just enough to cover the bones.

    **NOTE: Remember to keep the liquid no higher than one inch below the rim of the pot, as the volume expands slightly during cooking.

    Bring pot to a boil.

    A large amount of frothy scum will rise to the top, and it is important to remove this with a spoon or mesh skimmer. After you have skimmed, reduce heat and add the thyme and crushed peppercorns.

    Simmer stock for at least 12 and as long as 72 hours. Just before finishing, add the parsley and simmer another 10 minutes.

    At this point, the broth will look more like a scary brown liquid with globs of gelatinous and fatty material. It won’t even smell very good.

    However, all you need to do is to strain it properly to get a delicious and nourishing clear broth that you can use for myriad soups and stews and other dishes.

    So, remove bones with tongs or a slotted spoon, and strain the stock through a sieve or mesh strainer and into a large bowl.

    Refrigerate the bowl and, once it’s cold, remove the hardened fat from the top.

    Transfer to smaller containers, and freeze for long-term storage.

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    Guest debbh

    Posted

    Thank you for your healthy bone broth recipes. Have made chicken bone broth and it always makes good soup or stew base. Will make beef broth next and also will try fish broth when I can get fish heads. It's easy to do, just takes time to simmer. So nutritious and made with ingredients most people would throw away. YUM!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/17/2015 - Homemade bone broth is a great foundation for a healthy diet, and helps to promote gut healing, and overall health.
    Simmering animal bones and marrow, feet, tendons, and ligaments in water for one or two days turns collagen into gelatin, and produces a rich complex soup of amino acids and highly absorbable minerals like calcium, magnesium, sulfur, silicon, phosphorus, along with trace minerals.
    For best results use organic pasture raised, or free-range chickens. Many commercially-raised chickens produce stock that does not gel properly.
    Ingredients:
    1 whole free-range chicken or 2 to 3 pounds of bony chicken parts, such as backs, breastbones, necks and wings 2-4 chicken feet gizzards from one chicken 4 quarts cold water 2 tablespoons vinegar 1 large onion, coarsely chopped 2 carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped 3 celery stalks, with leaves, coarsely chopped 1 bunch flat parsley Directions:
    If you are using a whole chicken, cut off the wings and remove the neck, and the gizzards from the cavity.
    Cut chicken parts, including neck and wings, into several pieces.
    Place chicken or chicken pieces in a large stock pot with water, vinegar and all vegetables, except parsley.
    Let stand 30 minutes to 1 hour. Bring to a boil, and skim away any froth that rises to the top.
    Reduce heat, cover and simmer for at least 6 to 8 hours, and up to 24 hours. Longer simmering time makes richer and more flavorful broth.
    About 10 minutes before finishing the stock, add parsley. This is important, as is adds ionized minerals to the broth.
    Remove chicken carcass and any meat and bones with a slotted spoon. If using a whole chicken, let it cool and then strip the meat away.
    Keep the meat to use in other meals, such as chicken salad, casseroles, enchiladas. You can also add it to any soup you might make with the broth later on.
    Strain the stock into a large bowl and refrigerate until the fat rises to the top and hardens.
    Skim off fat and store the stock in covered containers in your refrigerator or freezer.
    Use broth liberally whenever a recipe calls for broth.

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