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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Jefferson Adams
    This is one of my favorite soups because of it’s so simple to make yet still yields a rich, rustic texture. A few simple spices and fresh ginger beautifully compliment the sweetness of the potatoes.
    Unlike a lot of soups I prepare, I like to leave this one un-blended. The softness of the potatoes pieces is really comforting. This soup goes great with a piece of gluten-free bread. I also like to top it with a mild salsa or chutney.
    Mango chutney offers a delightful surprise to the palate and makes for a sophisticated presentation.
    Ingredients:
    3 large sweet potatoes, peeled and diced
    2 small yellow onions, chopped
    4 gloves garlic, minced
    1 tablespoon fresh ginger
    1 tablespoon curry powder
    1 teaspoon coriander
    3 tablespoons butter
    6 cups chicken stock

    Directions:
    Heat butter in a large stock pot or soup pot. Add onions and garlic and sauté until onions begin to sweat, 3-5 minutes.
    Add sweet potatoes, spices and fresh ginger, sauté for another 1-2 minutes.
    Slowly add chicken stock 1 cup at a time, slowly stirring. Gently simmer until potatoes are soft and easily pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes, depending on size of potato pieces.
    Serve in warmed bowls.


    Jefferson Adams
    I remember zucchini and squash growing in the neighbor's garden when I was a kid. Though I didn't much care for it then, I've come to love zucchini. Good zucchini soup is a delight to taste. This summer favorite goes nicely warm, but I prefer it chilled and garnished with dill for cool, delicious, savory soup at its best.
    Ingredients:
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 garlic cloves, roasted
    2 onions, chopped
    2 potatoes, peeled and diced
    8 zucchini, chopped
    1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
    1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary
    1/2 teaspoon dried basil
    1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
    4 cups chicken broth
    1 cup whole milk
    1/4 cup dry potato flakes, gluten-free
    1 tablespoon gluten-free tamari or soy sauce
    4 tablespoons chopped fresh dill weed
    Directions:
    Take a head of garlic and slice off the top. Add a splash of olive oil and place on foil in toaster oven. Roast garlic head for about 1 hour at 375 F.
    In a large frying pan, melt butter; add onion and sauté until translucent. Add diced potato, zucchini, thyme, rosemary, basil, and white pepper, and cook for 5 minutes.
    In a medium-sized cooking pot, add broth and bring to boil. Add zucchini/potato mixture; reduce heat and simmer about 15 minutes.
    When cooked, transfer ingredients in small portions to a food processor or blender. Add the roasted garlic cloves and purée the ingredients and pour into cooking pot.
    Add milk and bring just to below boiling, but do not boil.
    Add instant mashed potato flakes and soy sauce and stir well. Adjust seasonings to taste.
    Chill, and serve garnished with dill weed. Spread the remaining garlic on toasted gluten-free bread and eat with soup! Yum!


    Jefferson Adams
    In my house, summertime means fresh vegetables and great salads. Salads are a quick and easy way to add splash to just about any meal, and to add extra nutrients to your diet. They are packed with fiber, vitamins and minerals, and can brighten your palate, along with your meal.
    Here's an easy recipe for one of my favorite, delicious summertime salads. It is quick, easy and very flexible. It can be made as is, or adapted to your favorite vegetables, or to what you have on hand. However you make it, it's sure to help keep you and your guests happy and healthy and smiling all summer long.
    Ingredients:
    Red leaf or green leaf lettuce Heirloom tomato wedges Organic carrot, shredded Red bell peppers, sliced thin Avocado, peeled and sliced Sunflower seeds, roasted Cucumber, peeled and sliced Cilantro, in small sprigs (as desired) Directions:
    Rinse lettuce and pat dry with a paper towel or spin it in a salad spinner.
    Tear lettuce into pieces of desired size and toss into a large salad bowl or individual serving bowls.
    Place desired quantities of other fresh ingredients into the bowl(s). Top with sunflower seeds. I've found that adding some cilantro sprigs to my salad really makes it pop with flavor. If you don't like cilantro, feel free to skip it.
    In fact, you can feel free to add and subtract any ingredients at will. Add your favorites, or skip what you don't like. This particular salad offers numerous variations, all delicious.
    Serve with honey-mustard dressing on the side.
    Honey-Mustard Vinaigrette Salad Dressing
    Ingredients:
    1 cup olive oil 1 clove garlic, peeled & sliced in half 1 tablespoon dijon mustard 1 tablespoon honey 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar salt pepper Directions:
    Rub the sides of a bowl with garlic, then discard. In the bowl whisk together mustard, honey and vinegar. Slowly whisk in the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Scale recipe as needed.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/20/2013 - A good winter vegetable soup recipe is a must, especially for those really cold days when you need a good hot pot on the stove to warm things up and raise spirits with the aroma of good food.
    This winter vegetable soup does the trick nicely. It features tasty seasonal vegetables like squash, turnip, carry, chard and apple to deliver a rich, hearty soup. I like to add rice to mine for an extra hearty kick.
    Ingredients:
    4 leeks, white and pale-green parts only, halved lengthwise, cut into 1-inch pieces, and washed well 3 medium carrots, cut into cubes 3 medium shallots, finely chopped 3 celery stalks, cut on the bias into ½-inch-thick pieces 1 quart canned chicken stock 1 cup water 1 sweet potato, peeled and cut into cubes 1 Russet potato, cut into cubes 1 pound Swiss chard, stems trimmed, leaves coarsely chopped 1 cup peeled, cored and coarsely chopped Granny Smith apple 1 cup peeled and coarsely chopped turnip 1 cup peeled and chopped butternut squash 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 cup coarsely chopped onion 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2 tablespoons thinly sliced fresh dill 1 ounce piece Parmesan cheese rind Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper Directions:
    Heat oil in a large saucepan on medium-high heat.
    Add first leeks, then shallots and celery, and sauté until translucent.
    Add apple, turnip, squash, carrot, potato and sweet potato; season with salt, then sauté 5 minutes.
    Add stock, and Parmesan rind.
    Bring to a boil and simmer, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes or until vegetables are tender.
    Add salt and pepper to taste. Cool slightly.
    Carefully pureé in a blender. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/25/2018 - The latest studies show that celiac disease now affects 1.2% of the population. That’s millions, even tens of millions of people with celiac disease worldwide. The vast majority of these people remain undiagnosed. Many of these people have no clear symptoms. Moreover, even when they do have symptoms, very often those symptoms are atypical, vague, and hard to pin on celiac disease.
    Here are three ways that you can help your healthcare professionals spot celiac disease, and help to keep celiacs gluten-free: 
    1) Your regular doctor can help spot celiac disease, even if the symptoms are vague and atypical.
    Does your doctor know that anemia is one of the most common features of celiac disease? How about neuropathy, another common feature in celiac disease? Do they know that most people diagnosed with celiac disease these days have either no symptoms, or present atypical symptoms that can make diagnosis that much harder? Do they know that a simple blood test or two can provide strong evidence for celiac disease?
    People who are newly diagnosed with celiac disease are often deficient in calcium, fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and zinc. Deficiencies in copper and vitamin B6 are less common, but still possible. Also, celiac disease is a strong suspect in many patients with unexplained nutritional anemia. Being aware of these vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease can help people get bette advice, and hopefully speed up a diagnosis.
    2) Your dentist can help spot celiac disease
    Does your dentist realize that dental enamel defects could point to celiac disease? Studies show that dental enamel defects can be a strong indicator of adult celiac disease, even in the absence of physical symptoms. By pointing out dental enamel defects that indicate celiac disease, dentists can play an important role in diagnosing celiac disease.
    3) Your pharmacist can help keep you gluten-free
    Does your pharmacist know which medicines and drugs are gluten-free, and which might contain traces of gluten? Pharmacists can be powerful advocates for patients with celiac disease. They can check ingredients on prescription medications, educate patients to help them make safer choices, and even speak with drug manufacturers on patients’ behalf.
    Pharmacists can also help with information on the ingredients used to manufacture various vitamins and supplements that might contain wheat.
    Understanding the many vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease, and the ways in which various types of health professionals can help, is a powerful tool for helping to diagnose celiac disease, and for managing it in the future. If you are suffering from one or more of these symptoms, and suspect celiac disease, be sure to gather as much information as you can, and to check in with your health professionals as quickly as possible.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
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