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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    Gluten-Free Airline Travel


    Daniel Moran

    Celiac.com 05/08/2008 - I am here to help you with your needs as you travel, and to be able to keep the "Gluten Monster" away, so you can enjoy your trip.


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    When getting ready to fly you have to expect long delays.  As a celiac that means you have to try to find food.  If you haven’t traveled by plane before you will be in for a big surprise.  The restaurants that are in the airports are always busy.  This means that it is like going to a restaurant at peak time, and, in my opinion, that is not the best time for celiacs to eat in restaurants.  You might want to try the fast food places that are chains if they are in the airport.  The usual method is to try to get the manager to help you.  Give the manager a fresh plastic fork to retrieve your meat or chicken so they don’t use gloves that have bread crumbs on them.  Ask for catsup or mayo packages so you can read the ingredients.  You can ask for them to make a fresh salad if that is what you like.  One of the good things about most of the restaurants in airports is that at many of them you will be able to see the cooks prepare your food. Never be afraid to say “I saw you put my food on the table and bread got on it” and ask for a new meal.

    If there are no chain restaurants at the airport go to one of the restaurants where you can watch your food get made.  Some of the restaurants have the cooking grill right in front of you.  See if they can cook the food (hamburger, chicken) on the grill.  You have to determine if they put the buns on the grill. If they do grill the buns on the same grill where they cook your food there is a good chance that crumbs are there and you should stay away or ask them to clean the grill with the razor blade tool.  You have to determine how busy they are and if they are too busy don’t ask for something like that.  Sometimes I ask for my food to be covered and microwaved.  This is a very safe way to have your food cooked and if it is busy in the kitchen, your food is well protected.

    You still need to be careful with the salads in these types of restaurants.  Remember that these places are usually busy and crumbs fly around everywhere.  If they are slow ask if they can open a fresh bag of processed salad for you because you get very ill from the smallest crumb.

    What Chef Daniel does when Flying
    When I fly I always have a plan B.  I bring a carry on bag with some gluten-free food that is in a clear plastic bag.  This is food that if security says throw it away, I do.  So far all the times I have traveled by air I haven’t been asked to throw anything away. I bring food that can last all day without spoiling.  I bring food that if it gets hot and melts it is still good to eat.  I like ham, pepperoni, cheese, vegetables, peanuts and some candy to keep me going. Just remember to tell the security that you have a special diet in case they ask, but don’t offer the info unless they ask.  You need to be truthful and most folks are going to understand.  Let the security know that you are unable to eat in the local airport restaurants and you have a long day ahead of you. You don’t want to cause any trouble in an airport so be willing to throw it away the second they ask.  You could pull out your chef Daniel restaurant paper to show them how serous you take eating and by providing your list it will show them that you are very serious.  It is just a way to show security how serious you take your health.

    Now you should be ok if you got through security and when the flight attendant comes around offering food, especially if you are on a flight for a long time, you have some food that will carry you over.  Most airlines will take special requests for meals but you are taking a huge chance on eating that food.  The caterers who do these meals for the planes do thousands and thousands of meals.  I don’t take the chance of eating such a meal.  I get way to sick if there is any contamination. When I call in for a special request for a meal I ask for whole fruit or whole vegetables, anything I know that hasn’t been on a cutting board.  

    I usually ask for carrots or other vegetables or fruit that I like.  I am scared of being sick so I will cut or break my food then eat it.  Even at restaurants I ask for whole vegetables for me to cut myself.  If you read my last article about my salad with croutons coming to me you can see why I am so scared of restaurants. Once you are burned you never forget...but you do learn.

    If you call ahead to the airport to ask for a special diet request make sure you are thorough with your request and tell them how sick you can get.  Ask the airlines if you can send a request per email or snail mail with your directions in how to prepare your meal.  I would ask the caterer to tape your request right to your plate so when you board the plane it will be easy to see.  As you board notify the stewards you are the special meal request.  Be sure to have a plan B. Look at your meal carefully when you get it and determine if it is up to your standards.

    I believe this article can help you travel gluten-free on board any airline.  There are always little stops where you can buy a piece of fruit or packaged products but if you want something more like a hot meal you will need to follow my advice to stay safe.

    Gluten-Free Air Travel Hints:

    • You should always try to getthe manager to help you.  In any restaurant they have the most time tohelp you and they will help you because they typically care more thanthe regular workers (today’s restaurants have employees that come inone day and are gone the next.help.  It is sad but that is the way itis so at least try to get the manager.
    • Don’t be ashamed to askfor anything. If you want a hot dog or the chips they put on the sideof the plate ask for a bag with the product inside.  Take out your safeand forbidden lists if needed and look at them to see if you can eat aproduct. 
    • Always have your Chef Daniel's restaurant paper with you in your walletor purse.
    • Always have a copy of your safe and forbidden lists with youin case you need it to read ingredients.
    • Always have a gluten-free restaurant card in the language you need.
    • Crosscontamination is the greatest risk for a celiac when traveling.  Crosscontamination can happen and you would never know it, such as when thechef uses a knife to cut a piece of bread, and then they use the sameknife on your vegetables, or when the chef uses a pair of tongs to flipa breaded chicken and then uses them to flip your sauté chicken.Thereare too many other ways to mention, but the main thing is that glutencould be on the tool before it is used on your meal, and it doesn’tmatter how safe the chef thought he was because you got one crumb andyou are sick for days and that ruins your vacation.
    Chef Daniel

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    I also plan ahead in my travels to find out where all the natural health food stores are wherever I visit, even in Europe. In USA, use map websites to find out about the neighborhood you are visiting.

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    Southwest doesn't serve meals, even on long cross country flights. They serve snacks; people should be aware that their peanuts have wheat flour in them! Who ever heard of such a thing? On a recent flight they were offering a choice of snacks; you guessed it! EVERYTHING offered had gluten! I just sent them an email asking them to consider their gluten free passengers. Some plain potato chips would be welcome.

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    Guest Richard James

    Posted

    I fly on about 110 airplanes every year. I concur with, and practice, everything you list here. Eating a meal is not a great risk for me because on the Delta flights, gluten free meals actually make it to the plane only about 5% of the time, and Rice Chex is, well, Rice Chex. They usually have segregated fruit, yogurt, peanuts, Kind bars, etc., and are always anxious to help with options. My reaction to gluten poisoning is similar to food poisoning. Sudden severe acute sweating followed by waves on nausea, followed by a few hours of throwing up. I contacted my doctor, about this, and he wrote me a prescription for Zophran, a strong anti-nausea medication that you administer by dissolving in your mouth. (Doesn't need to be swallowed where it is just as likely to be returned before it can get into your system.) These tabs stay with me in my computer bag, so I can have them in my hands in seconds whenever I am on the road. I have used them thee times in the last couple of years, once on an airplane, when I mistakenly eaten a glutenous trail mix bought in the airport. It has kept me from throwing up each time. I still feel like crap for a couple days after, but it is far better than throwing up on a plane and suffering the soreness around the rib cage, or the damage to the throat from regurgitation.

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    Daniel Moran
    Celiac.com 05/05/2008 - We have all had our terrible times at a restaurant. It doesn't matter if it is your local diner or a 5 Star restaurant--it is hard to have somebody make our food if the smallest crumb can make you sick, then ruin your day or week. With a little preparation on your part, you can go on a cruise or dine on food made for a king or queen.
    Preparing for Your Travel
    The most important part of any travel is to prepare for it. If you are like our family you search for a fare that the family can afford.  You also have to go the extra step for your food. “PLEASE REMEMBER I GET VERY SICK FROM THE SMALLEST CRUMB SO I GOT TO BE SO CAREFUL OR I AM SICK FOR 5 DAYS.”  Not every one is like me but I am one of the worst cases so I have to be extra careful. Judge for yourself and decide what you can handle and how extreme you need to be.
    When you are looking for a place to sleep if you are booking your motels ahead of time it is nice to try to get a microwave and refrigerator in your room. Most chains have a few rooms with microwaves in them so ask for it. During our trip to Las Vegas I cooked a whole chicken in the microwave and then cooled it and put it in our little fridge.  When I got hungry and my wife got pizza or a burger and I just didn’t trust the place I would wait and go to my room to eat. You don’t have to go that far, but if you like a canned or other product you can pick it up from a local grocery store and then warm it up.
    Don’t forget to ask, especially if you are staying at a resort or a hotel with restaurant, whether they have a gluten-free menu.  Not every restaurant knows about the "Gluten Monster." Eventually we will get out the word and the world will cook for us.
    One time when we were traveling we found a little deli that was just across from the hotel and they prepared gluten free-food if you ordered a day ahead.   My wife ordered some gluten-free bread sticks for our dinner. We picked them up and brought them to dinner.  The restaurant didn’t have a problem with this and they said that for the next meal they would have someone pick up our food from there if we wished.
    Perform Internet searches for the area where you will be staying and look for any advertised gluten-free restaurants or health food stores. Also check to see if there is a local celiac group.  The local celiac support group will know of restaurants and stores in that and can make other important suggestions.  You can find some of this info right here at celiac.com.  The celiac groups can be reached by email and they will know of all the important information that you can use during a trip to their area. This also goes for any trips outside the USA.
    You should be prepared for your trip. You know where you’re staying and you already have got some contacts with fellow celiacs in the area and where you can eat. Let’s start by getting your paper work ready.

     You need your gluten-free list of ingredients.  The safe or forbidden list if you are not sure what you can and can’t eat. You need a gluten-free restaurant card.  This is what you use when you go to a restaurant to let the cook or chef know that you are a celiac and your food needs special handling. You should make plenty of copies of them to last for your trip, and it needs to be in the language that is common for the place you are going.  If you are going into Mexico it needs to be in English and Spanish. If you are bringing spices to put on your food, I some times like to bring a small amount of a Cajon spice that I make up.  I ask for my food not to be spiced in the kitchen because in the resorts that I have worked at we would make our own salt and pepper mixtures to season the food and everybody used it--meaning everyone’s hands, including crumbs could be in it.  Bring your own gluten-fre soy sauce and other sauces like hot sauce. Make sure you have all your gluten-free information. The restaurants, delis and any thing you need plus the directions and phone numbers.  Don’t get there and find out that you have just ended up on the wrong side of the tracks. Keep all of this in a folder nice and tidy so you know where it is.
    If you have to drive I found it very easy to stop at a fast food place.  The kids like it and if you haven’t noticed most of them keep it very clean and that is very important to us. Ask for your food to be made fresh. Even at fast food restaurants mistakes can happen and if you ask for a salad right from the counter it could have bread on it.  They will prepare your food fresh if you ask and be nice and tell them you have a special diet and you will get very sick from a crumb.Ask for the manager at this fast food place to help you.  The manager is going to be someone who has worked at the restaurant longer than a week and will care more.  Again tell them you have a special diet request and you could get very ill if you vary a crumb.  It’s a crap shoot that the manager might prepare your food or will tell some one to make it for you.
    When you go to the fast food place you don’t have to eat salads only.  I go and ask for “Double burger with cheese and lettuce, tomatoes, onions.”  No sauces, catsup, mustard, mayo or pickles.  Ask for the packets that are for to go and you can read what the ingredients are in them.  I ask them to prepare it for me and I watch to make sure they use a clean fork that I hand them or if they put fresh gloves on. With these fast food restaurants you can see all the way to the back and I love that. Order some French fries if you know they are gluten-free and you’re on your way. Make sure if you do order French fries that they only cook French fries in that fryer and they cook nothing else in them. If you eat at any restaurant you must ask them if they are made in a dedicated fryer.
    Some fast food places have chicken breast and other food so again, you don’t just have to eat salads. If you don’t stop at a fast food place and it is not on your list of gluten-free places you should get out one of your “Chef Daniel Letters” to give to the chefs in the back.  Be prepared to wait longer.  When you arrive ask the waiter or matre’d if they have a gluten-free menu.
    If they have gluten-free menu that is great but the gluten-free menus I have seen don’t give the restaurant its due.  They just put a few items on the menu like salad and a steak and expect that to feed everyone…WRONG.  Chef Daniel wants to eat what I want not what they tell me what I can eat.  I mean if my wife can have chicken, pork, shrimp, lobster, lamb and that entire menu why can I only get three things? I AM A BIG BOY…one of my pet peeves is this limited choices offered by most gluten-free menus.
    It is so much easier to talk with the manager when you come in and explain that you have a special diet request and you will get very ill than it is to explain it to the wait staff who have 12 tables and could care less about you because the manager is yelling at them to get to the next table or that an order is up.
    If you don’t order from the gluten free menu and you see something else on it you might like you have to ask questions:

    Is the product marinated before it is cooked? If it is you can’t have it. Like a chicken teriyaki. Can it be thawed if it is in the freezer? They have all of the chicken or pork in a marinade but they have some in the freezer and could they microwave it to thaw it so you can have it. What type of broiler do they use if you’re asking for your food to broil and can it be cleaned before you have your food broiled?  Food stays on the broiler for a while so it must be steel brushed, or the chicken teriyaki he just cooked could be on your broiled steak.  The over the head broilers can have the grills lifted up to the flame and it will cook everything away. If the waiter or manager can’t answer your questions you should look to see if you can ask for the cook. Before you ask for the cook you should look around the dining hall and if it is extremely busy remember you are not the only one there and asking for a cook might really upset them. If it is slow the chef or cook won’t mind coming out.  If it looks too busy you should only ask the manager or keep it very simple.
    When you decide what you are eating I like to put down on the paper exactly how to cook my food (Chef Daniel P. form). Do I want it pan fried or broiled? If I have it broiled I ask them to steel brush the grill.  Your Chef Daniel slip should ask them to use a fresh tong, knives, cutting board and even a fresh cloth if they wipe your plate.    I give them as much direction I can think of so they know I am very serious about my special diet and that if prepared wrong in any way I will get very ill.Real World Here
     I have gone to a restaurant and did everything I said--triple checked and the salad came out with croutons on it. I am polite to the wait staff and tell them again that I can’t have any bread on my salad. Then I gave it back to the wait staff and sat and waited for a new salad and I received the salad I JUST GAVE THEM TO TAKE BACK and they simply took the croutons off the salad and brought it right back to me!
    Don’t be afraid to say “Hey you just brought me the same salad back and I can see the crumbs from the croutons.” Oh yeah that is a true story. Check your food carefully when it comes out to you.  If you see the tiniest piece of something that doesn’t look right say NO WAY.  You order a steak and you see a bit of carrot on it THAT PROBALLY MEANS HE USED TONGS THAT HE USED TO PICK UP CARROTS WITH. The carrots are not on your plate.  My wife has to deal with me when we go out to eat but I have no choice because the smallest crumb takes me out for four days. I’d rather go hungry then get sick. When that salad came out I gave them one chance and if they don’t do it right I don’t take the chance with the local “hot head” cook to get one over on me.  I POLITLY SAY “NO THANK YOU,  I DON’T WANT TO EAT HERE ANYMORE” . It’s my money, my health and sadly, during the subsequent four days that I am sick they don’t care about me, so I’d rather get some cheese or chips or something simple. In these cases I leave the restaurant and they take my food off of the bill because I don’t eat a thing.
    So always have an alternative plan if you can’t eat.  My wife and kids can eat but if I don’t feel the right vibe in the restaurant I must move on, and you should to.  It’s not hard for any restaurant to make a burger and fries for the family so let them eat and you move on to plan B.  Again each person’s tolerance is different so you have to make up your mind but it is your trip and your health.
    When you are on the road you have to choose your restaurant and always have a plan B.  I choose the fast food because I can watch them make my food. You might like to be pampered so pick a nice restaurant and try to make sure it is not during peak hours--this will help a lot.
    I hope this is Helpful
    Chef Daniel P.
    I will continue with staying at hotels and motels in my next article.


    Jill Schaefer
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    Jill: We decided to share an enormous plate of salty prosciutto and cold sweet melon as an appetizer. Jeff ordered pesce spada griglia (grilled swordfish) and I chose petto di pollo aceto (grilled chicken with a balsamic vinaigrette, parmesan and arugula). We nibbled at each other's dishes and savored every bite of that culinary welcoming, so much so that we'd find ourselves back for more during our stay. Days later, upon seeing zuppa di verdura (minestrone soup) on the menu, Jeff asked how it was prepared. Our server confirmed it did not contain any noodles/macaroni or gluten, and Jeff was pleased to have his fill of the strictly vegetable-based soup, which we learned is how minestrone is typically prepared in the region. Experimental cook that he is, Jeff was eager already to replicate the recipe when we returned home to San Francisco.
    Jeff: The Villa Rosa provided an ample gluten-free breakfast. Each morning my tray included a gluten-free chocolate croissant and gluten-free toast with butter and jam, along with our usual assortment of coffee, tea and yogurt. After we finished a late breakfast, lounging at the beach was one of our favorite things to do. Like many beach areas, lunch fare leaned toward sandwiches, pizzas and the like. The few restaurants tended to be overpriced, but we found a reliable alternative in the salumeria, the Italian version of the delicatessen which means "cured meat shop." It had a variety of cheeses, meats and salads priced by the kilo. In addition to fresh pasta and pasta salads, the place usually had salads that were pasta-free and gluten-free.   
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    Day Nine: When we arrived in the more isolated fishing village of Praiano, a veritable country cousin to cosmopolite Positano, Jeff plopped down in the pastel-hued restaurant of the Hotel Margherita mere minutes after dropping his bags. He was famished and awaited a sumptuous plate of spaghetti posillipo, made with the hotel's gluten-free spaghetti and mushrooms. In fact, Jeff was so enamored with the heaping dish of gluten-free goodness that he borrowed my digital camera to snap a photo and in a flurry of excitement accidentally erased all of our other pictures! Well, at least we've got the memories...
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    Jill: Perusing our guidebook, we found a trattoria tucked away beyond the main piazza called Cumpa' Cosimo and decided to give it a try for dinner. Thankfully we'd made a reservation, as the medieval-inspired place that was dotted with pictures of celebrities and run by Italian nonna (grandmother) Netta Bottone filled up fast. Everything on the menu looked enticing. The roasted rabbit caught Jeff's eye, along with more minestrone soup. He couldn't seem to get enough of the stuff! Craving comfort food, I bypassed the local specialties for a four-cheese pizza and glass of beer. After trying a bit of Jeff's entrée, though, I had a serious case of rabbit envy! We were pushing our last-bite limits when Netta paraded over to our table with a complimentary dessert, something like a cross between cheesecake and tiramisù, which Jeff picked at in order to avoid the crust (Celiac.com does not recommend doing this), and I couldn't resist polishing off. When Jeff mentioned that he was a writer as we paid our tab, Netta darted back to the kitchen and returned with a plate of figs and grapes. From her garden, she said, and insisted we put them in our pockets for later.
    Day Fourteen: Rome may be the Eternal City, but we had all of a day and a half there to explore, with the half starting after our nine-hour transit by private car, Amtrak train and then a female Formula One taxi driver at Termini Station. Since the next day was Sunday and we had no desire to fight the faithful who would attend mass, we opted for a quick visit to St. Peter's and from there trotted over to the Trastevere district for dinner. The Trastevere, a bohemian counterpart to New York's East Village, is one of my favorite places and it won over Jill, who hadn't quite been captured by the Roman magic.
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    In general, we noticed an abundance of gluten-free salads, soups, roasted meats and risottos in Rome and in all four towns we passed through along the Amalfi Coast. We found reliable delis and easy access to fresh fruit. When we asked, places that did not have gluten-free pasta showed a willingness to prepare any that you provided. So, with a quick trip to the local pharmacy for some gluten-free pasta, you could dine with confidence! Contrary to our fears before the trip, eating gluten-free while traveling in Italy proved easy to do. With a bit of planning, a call to the airline to line up a gluten-free meal, an Italian/English explanation of your dietary needs and the standard caution nearly all people with gluten intolerance bring to eating out, anyone can look forward to an enjoyable, gluten-free holiday in Italy.
    Co-written by Jefferson Adams


    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 05/20/2010 - The weather is getting warm and it's almost that time again-time to go camping! Camping is supposed to be relaxing and fun. Most people camp to escape the monotony of the daily rut, and to get back to the basics. Eating gluten-free while camping is really easy, once you know what to bring and what to avoid.
    Camping trips usually consist of the same easy to prepare foods. Chili, pasta, canned soups, hot chocolate, sandwiches, hot cereal, trail mix and  s'mores are the high-lights of most camping meals. All of those things can easily be prepared gluten-free. In fact, many gluten-free already prepared foods can be used for camping trips. Anything canned or boxed that you normally enjoy at home, can typically be converted to camping food.
    It is important to eat the perishable foods first. A  camping trip lasting for more than one night can render perishable foods inedible. That's why it's important to eat  refrigerated food on the first day or two, and save the shelf-stable food for the remainder of the trip. Store  perishables in a cooler with plenty of ice and/or cold packs. To grill gluten-free food,  avoid gluten contamination by using a grill from home. Using the grill provided at the camping site is possible, but using aluminum foil or a pan as a buffer  will keep food away from gluten contamination. There are even special racks with ridges that can be placed on the the grill and will keep food from touching the grill.

    Two Day Sample Meal Plan (everything should be gluten-free):
    Day 1-
    Breakfast- Pancakes with fresh berries and real maple syrup Snack- Energy Bars Lunch- Sandwiches with gluten-free bread Snack- Carrots & celery sticks Dinner- Instant mashed potatoes, instant gravy, grilled meat and/or veggies.  Dessert- S'mores (see recipe below)
    Day 2-
    Breakfast- Hot cereal with fresh berries or raisins Snack- Trail mix  Lunch- Sandwiches Snack- Jerky Dinner- Chili, hot dogs,  buns, canned vegetables Dessert-  hot chocolate
    Make sure to buy all gluten-free products. Don't forget the gluten-free sunscreen and the gluten-free insect repellent.
    Gluten-Free S'mores Recipe
    Ingredients
    Gluten-free marshmallows Gluten-free graham crackers Gluten-free chocolate bars
    To Make
    1. Put your marshmallow on a fire safe skewer. Heat the marshmallow over an open flame until it begins to brown and melt.
    2. Break the graham cracker in half. Sandwich the chocolate between the cracker and the hot marshmallow. Allow the chocolate to melt and the marshmallow to cool a moment before eating.
    3. Add strawberries or other gluten-free favorites.Happy Trails!


    Vanessa Oakley
    Celiac.com 08/06/2013 - I recently went camping with a good friend of mine and her boyfriend. This was a last minute trip that I knew I was kind of going solo. I have never been camping without a partner or at least a tent mate. So this was the first time I only had to think of me. How cool is that?!
    I start every out of town adventures the same way—I make a trip calendar to plan out my clothes, meals and supplies (If I could only show you guys all the lists I make!).  I find that when I'm camping there is a level of community in the supplies and food department. I forgot forks, no worries buddy I brought extra. Try this, I made it myself or I brought too many hot dogs, eat them. This can be dangerous for a celiac. No one wants to be the guy that has to read everything in sight before they touch it. Or maybe you do, that's cool too—be yourself. I have always subscribed to the theory that if I don't know what it is or what's in it, I simply say "no thank you," even if it kills me to say no, and makes me think about how yummy that thing could have been.
    The day before I went camping I took my list and headed to the grocery store. When I got home and packed I was pretty happy with my haul. I know that I have a lot—more than enough to feed myself for the trip, including snacks. I am self-sufficient…as long as they have some sanitizer and some biodegradable soap for dishes. But I had everything else I needed...I hoped.
    To my delight and surprise my lovely friend and her lovely boyfriend had over-packed in the food department with stuff that happened to be gluten-free. I know that some things she would have packed with me in mind (thank you Lindsay!), but other things were as much a surprise to her as they were to me. Between the both of us we all ate like kings that weekend!
    It is a bit difficult to write about gluten-free trials and tribulations when everything works out. Where there is no worry about cross-contamination or drunken mix-ups. I was the only person to bring out "bread." I found some hotdog buns that looked promising. They got toasted over the fire in a wire basket thing and were so good!
    There are, of course, some things to look out for when you are camping. Be aware of a stove top or grill if you have things like that at the site. You never know what someone else cooked on that, even if it's just meat it may have been seasoned with things that contain gluten. Also, don't mix up your hotdog stick with someone else, unless everyone also has gluten-free dogs. Don't borrow shampoo or face wash. There are so many things that can have gluten in them!
    I definitely learned some stuff about myself on this trip. I learned that I am lucky enough to have surrounded myself with good caring, thoughtful people.  I love camping and I never knew how easy celiac disease would eventually become for me. Did I mention that I am also terrified of spiders!

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
    For a couple of decades now, scientists have been searching for a biological Rosetta stone that would allow them to engineer proteins with precision, but the problem has remained dauntingly complex.  Researchers had a pretty good understanding of the very simple way that the linear chemical code carried by strands of DNA translates into strings of amino acids in proteins. 
    But, one of the main problems in protein engineering has to do with the way proteins fold into their various three-dimensional structures. Until recently, no one has been able to decipher the rules that will predict how proteins fold into those three-dimensional structures.  So even if researchers were somehow able to design a protein with the right shape for a given job, they wouldn’t know how to go about making it from protein’s building blocks, the amino acids.
    But now, scientists like William DeGrado, a chemist at the University of California, San Francisco, and David Baker, director for the Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington, say that designing proteins will become at least as important as manipulating DNA has been in the past couple of decades.
    After making slow, but incremental progress over the years, scientists have improved their ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes. Among other things, they’ve gained a better understanding of how then the laws of physics cause the proteins to snap into folded origami-like structures based on the ways amino acids are attracted or repelled by others many places down the chain.
    It is this new ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes that has fueled their progress. UCSF’s DeGrado is using these new breakthroughs to search for new medicines that will be more stable, both on the shelf and in the body. He is also looking for new ways to treat Alzheimer’s disease and similar neurological conditions, which result when brain proteins fold incorrectly and create toxic deposits.
    Meanwhile, Baker’s is working on a single vaccine that would protect against all strains of the influenza virus, along with a method for breaking down the gluten proteins in wheat, which could help to generate new treatments for people with celiac disease. 
    With new computing power, look for progress on the understanding, design, and construction of brain proteins. As understanding, design and construction improve, look for brain proteins to play a major role in disease research and treatment. This is all great news for people looking to improve our understanding and treatment of celiac disease.
    Source:
    Bloomberg.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.
    But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by  “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it.
    With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether.
    A few of the choice tweets include the following:  
    “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt.
    Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions:
    Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender.
    Dish into bowls.
    Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. 
    Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
    The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow.
    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com