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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    GLUTEN-FREE CAMPING


    Vanessa Oakley

    Celiac.com 08/06/2013 - I recently went camping with a good friend of mine and her boyfriend. This was a last minute trip that I knew I was kind of going solo. I have never been camping without a partner or at least a tent mate. So this was the first time I only had to think of me. How cool is that?!


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    Photo: CC--RossI start every out of town adventures the same way—I make a trip calendar to plan out my clothes, meals and supplies (If I could only show you guys all the lists I make!).  I find that when I'm camping there is a level of community in the supplies and food department. I forgot forks, no worries buddy I brought extra. Try this, I made it myself or I brought too many hot dogs, eat them. This can be dangerous for a celiac. No one wants to be the guy that has to read everything in sight before they touch it. Or maybe you do, that's cool too—be yourself. I have always subscribed to the theory that if I don't know what it is or what's in it, I simply say "no thank you," even if it kills me to say no, and makes me think about how yummy that thing could have been.

    The day before I went camping I took my list and headed to the grocery store. When I got home and packed I was pretty happy with my haul. I know that I have a lot—more than enough to feed myself for the trip, including snacks. I am self-sufficient…as long as they have some sanitizer and some biodegradable soap for dishes. But I had everything else I needed...I hoped.

    To my delight and surprise my lovely friend and her lovely boyfriend had over-packed in the food department with stuff that happened to be gluten-free. I know that some things she would have packed with me in mind (thank you Lindsay!), but other things were as much a surprise to her as they were to me. Between the both of us we all ate like kings that weekend!

    It is a bit difficult to write about gluten-free trials and tribulations when everything works out. Where there is no worry about cross-contamination or drunken mix-ups. I was the only person to bring out "bread." I found some hotdog buns that looked promising. They got toasted over the fire in a wire basket thing and were so good!

    There are, of course, some things to look out for when you are camping. Be aware of a stove top or grill if you have things like that at the site. You never know what someone else cooked on that, even if it's just meat it may have been seasoned with things that contain gluten. Also, don't mix up your hotdog stick with someone else, unless everyone also has gluten-free dogs. Don't borrow shampoo or face wash. There are so many things that can have gluten in them!

    I definitely learned some stuff about myself on this trip. I learned that I am lucky enough to have surrounded myself with good caring, thoughtful people.  I love camping and I never knew how easy celiac disease would eventually become for me. Did I mention that I am also terrified of spiders!


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    Guest Lee Jenkins

    Posted

    Thank you for sharing your experience, we share coeliac disease and a horror of spiders. I also am intolerant to salicylates, amines and glutamates, but haven't yet been able to contact anyone else who has the same food issues. Good to know your food intolerance isn't limiting your lifestyle. Many thanks, Lee

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    Guest Debbie Sadel

    Posted

    I just came back from a camping during which I had the misfortune of having a celiac attack--or being celi-whacked as I call it. The culprit was probably the Kielbasa (Wolf's Head). It was labeled gluten-free but there must have been something in it. My husband was unaffected.

     

    Let me tell you, having an attack in a developed campground, in a tent, far from a bathroom--we'd chosen a site for privacy not convenience to restroom facilities--in the rain no less was not pleasant. We are talking about a mad rush for the woods here.

     

    Not that this is going to keep me from camping--many foods--even those that do not need refrigeration are fine and several of the freeze dried backpacking food manufacturers are now putting out gluten-free foods and labeling them as such. Natural High and Alpine two which I've used with great success. Mountain House has some meals which are fine but are not labeled gluten-free.

     

    It's just real important to be careful.

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    Guest Vanessa Oakley

    Posted

    I just came back from a camping during which I had the misfortune of having a celiac attack--or being celi-whacked as I call it. The culprit was probably the Kielbasa (Wolf's Head). It was labeled gluten-free but there must have been something in it. My husband was unaffected.

     

    Let me tell you, having an attack in a developed campground, in a tent, far from a bathroom--we'd chosen a site for privacy not convenience to restroom facilities--in the rain no less was not pleasant. We are talking about a mad rush for the woods here.

     

    Not that this is going to keep me from camping--many foods--even those that do not need refrigeration are fine and several of the freeze dried backpacking food manufacturers are now putting out gluten-free foods and labeling them as such. Natural High and Alpine two which I've used with great success. Mountain House has some meals which are fine but are not labeled gluten-free.

     

    It's just real important to be careful.

    I say I was 'glutened'.

    I'm so glad that your attack will not hamper your future camping excursions.

    I think it is so important to keep a social life, get outside, do things and to not let food or the worry of bad food stop us from having fun.

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    You make me want to go camping too. I can't think of a better excursion for those who are gluten-free than one that requires you to bring all of your own food anyway.

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    Guest Vanessa Oakley

    Posted

    You make me want to go camping too. I can't think of a better excursion for those who are gluten-free than one that requires you to bring all of your own food anyway.

    I know right!? Just because we have to be so careful with our food, this doesn't mean we shouldn't be outside having too much fun. If/when you do go camping, let me know how it went.

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    Guest Tori

    Posted

    Hello!

     

    This article is very happy, but I was wondering what you actually brought to eat. My boyfriend is gluten intolerant and I don't want to take things he cannot eat on our camping trip this summer. What sort of foods to you suggest?

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    Daniel Moran
    Celiac.com 06/03/2008 - As you travel and experience the sites of the world you are going to have to stop at a restaurant or destination that has a small kitchen.  Let me tell you a little bit about myself so you can understand that I also started in a small kitchen.
    Chef Daniel P's Autobiography
    I started working at the age of 13 and began my work in a very small tourist town and was promoted up from busboy to dishwasher.  I was so fast at washing the dishes that I was promoted up within a month to cook.  I went from the buffet type restaurant to an ala cart restaurant and buffet line.  At the age of 17 I was completely in charge of the kitchen—this included all ordering, menu making, staff hiring and firing, and every task a person would do to run a successful kitchen.  I didn’t know how to cook though—at least not compared to what I learned later. Yes I could do the basic menus but I wanted more and I left to climb the ladder of a big kitchen—so I set my sites on gourmet food.  At that time I saw that Prince Charles from England was visiting Palm Beach Florida.  I saw that he visited two places while he was in Palm Beach—the Palm Beach Polo Ground and he also visited the Breakers Resort.  I applied at both places when I came to Florida and both wanted to hire me.
    Every one has to start somewhere and you as the traveler are the ones who are going to train the future cooks or chefs.  Yes you—the cook is going to learn from you as celiac patrons, so you need to do the right training.  Let’s use the example of eating on a train that cooks for their patrons as they travel across the country.  I like to think of a small boat or train as two of the most difficult places to prepare a gluten-free meal.  They both are going to be small, and both have the potential to get bumpy while the cook is preparing food.  This means there is a good chance an accident can happen and of course cross-contamination.
    These kitchens probably keep their fires contained in the stove or flat top burners.  By keeping the flame for cooking contained in a box, this means they have less chance of a fire starting and that is very important if you are on a river or going down the train tracks. The cooks are going to use sauté pans, hard top grills, ovens, steam boxes and possibly microwaves.   If you know that you are going ahead of time to these types of restaurants you should see if they can send you the menu ahead of time so that you can look it over.
    Hint: If you know your destination for any of your trip, see if you can get the menu before you arrive, as most places always have their menus prepared ahead of time. If you get the menu you can make up your Chef Daniel P Restaurant Form before you go.
    I would try to spell out your entire meal in great detail.  I also use this technique for all mom and pop restaurants.  You are not insulting a cook or chef by asking them to prepare your meal a certain way.  Every day the cook receives orders from the waitress on how to prepare a particular meal.  Just because you are giving the instructions yourself only means to the chef that you are very serious about how your food is prepared.
    What to Eat And How to Cook Your Meal
    In these type of restaurants that are small and have limited space you have to try to eliminate any mistakes that the cook might make. How…you ask?  Try some of these ideas:

    Notify them ahead a time if you can.  Let the train, boat or any restaurant know that you are coming.  Make sure you tell them the date, time and how many people will be receiving special meals. Don’t be upset if you get there and no one knows that you are coming, it is just part of the business. Have their phone number available so when you arrive in the city you can call a few hours before you arrive to eat.  Just remind them again that you are planning on eating at their restaurant and ask them when their slowest time is. If it is a train or boat ask if you can eat at the last seating time (unless they indicate that an earlier time is slower).  Feel them out to see when the best time is for you to order a specially prepared meal. During your phone call, ask who you should ask for when you do arrive for your meal. Make sure you arrive with your Chef Daniel P Restaurant Form and a pen or pencil. When you arrive ask for the manager or the person you talked to on the phone. Tell the manager in great detail about your special diet request.  Let them know you will be writing out your request that will specifically tell them how to prepare your meal. Ask if there is anything you should know about the kitchen or the chef—anything that could help you in preparing your meal and making it as safe as possible.
    You might have to ask the manager how they cook their food. Some are going to use a flat-top grill, broiler, steamer or even a microwave oven.  Once you find this out it is time to create your meal instructions and present them to the manager so he can deliver them to the cook.How the Cook Prepares Your Food:

    Sautéing: To me is one of the safest ways to have your food prepared.  No matter if the cooks are in a small or large kitchen.  This is how I might write it down for the cook to see:  “Sauté 1 whole chicken breast in olive oil, make sure the pan is very clean and does not have a crumb on it.”  When asking to sauté you can ask for them to make a quick sauce in the pan.  That is what I do, even if it is just to squeeze a lemon on your food, this can add some fresh flavor. Hard Top Grill:  I don’t recommend using this unless you are the very first ones to arrive.  During the day when they cook on the grill pieces of food stay on the grill for the whole day.  You can ask them to use the razor blade to scrape the grill.  Even using the razor blade it is not 100% and food from other meals may get on your food. Steamer: This is a good way to cook as long as your food is the only one in the steamer.  You can ask them to wrap the food and this will keep all crumbs off of your food.  Example:  “Please wrap a piece of salmon up with some saran wrap.  Place it on a holey pan so the steam can circle salmon." Microwave: This is great for potatoes or vegetables and a good way to keep food safe.  I always ask for my veggies to be micro-waved.  This is a great way to get a baked potato.  Even some fish and other entrees can be cooked in the microwave.  Example: “Could you please cook a potato and my vegetables in the microwave.  Put them in a dish then cover with saran wrap.” Fryer: You must stay away from a fryer in small kitchens (unlike fast food chains and some bigger restaurants).  They use the fryer for everything and that means that everything could be in it. When they cook your French fries, the crumbs from the chicken nuggets could get on your food. Boiling: This is another great way to cook food.  You must ask them to only cover the food product that they are cooking.  Some fishes, vegetables and other meats can be cooked this way. If they have a steamer I would ask for that first since they don’t have to wait for it to get hot. Example:  “I would like two eggs boiled or poached in just enough water to cover the entrée so it won’t take so long. You could have the cook put a small amount of water then cover the pan and steam it.” Broiler: Sometimes small kitchens that are moving are not going to have a broiler.  It is the fear of the open fire that could cause a fire in the kitchen.  If they do have one you could ask for this example:  “I would like a piece of salmon on a metal plate.  Cook it until it is done, then splash it with white wine before plating.”

     The main idea you take into small kitchens is this:  It is a lot like cooking at your home (unless you have a huge kitchen).  Those kitchens are made small but can put out large amount of meals if needed.  Those menus are made to accommodate the small amount of storage also.  You need to really know your menu and the ingredients they are using.  Unlike a large kitchen you might not have the extra supplies that a big kitchen has.  They just don’t have the room and you need to think of that.  So if it is a river boat or a train, when you look at the menu some of the items will be canned products, because canned products are so much easier to store than refrigerated items. As you look at the menu take the item you would like and ask them if they can cook it in a sauté pan or maybe in the oven.  This is a very safe way to have your food prepared.
    When I was employed at the resort and we would often have banquets for over 200 people. If the meal was New York strip steak we would put the steaks on the broiler and mark the diamond char marks in order to get the steaks cooked exactly at the same time. We would then pull the steaks off and put them on large sheet pans. Just before we needed the steak, we would put them in the ovens and cook them until they were the proper temperature. The customers never knew that the steaks were cooked in the oven and not the broiler. The char marks on the steak made everyone believe that it was broiled.
    The point is that you can have your food baked as long as you don’t get sick—for me that is the most important thing.  When I do eat out, I don’t care too much about the taste or temperature of the meal—my number one goal is that I get a gluten-free meal and that the restaurant doesn’t ruin my vacation.
    Also, you have to be very careful when you send your food back.   Just remember how busy the cooks are and whether or not they are going to remember your specially ordered meal when it comes back to them.  If they are busy in the back and the waitress says to the cook, “Cook it more,” what do you think happens—will they take as much time as they did the first time?  These are the types of questions that you have to ask yourself when you are sitting at your table and thinking about sending your meal back.
    I know that we all expect a perfect meal when we pay for it.  Sometimes it is just easier to ask them to only warm it up in the microwave. Something to think about is that the microwave is like a closed room where it is not likely that your food will get contaminated.  Most kitchens, especially smaller ones, have a microwave like the one that you use at home.  If you do need your meal cooked more, try to explain it to the manager and remind him that you will get very sick if it gets contaminated—ask the manager nicely if you can watch and see if the cook does it right.
    Another thing to remember when you are eating in these types of restaurants is that they are small and that means the kitchens are small too.  The cooks are going to be right next to each other—only arms and shoulders apart. Remember; if you don’t think they will be able to feed you properly always have a plan B, so you can still eat. Plan your meal to be as simple as possible for them to prepare and you will be able to conquer the Gluten Monster and have a wonderful train or boat experience!
    Chef Daniel P. 

    Destiny Stone
    This is the time of year when familiestake vacations and travel the world. Traveling can often be stressfuleven under normal circumstances; packing problems, flight delays,getting lost, are all possible when trying to get from point A topoint B. So imagine how stressful it can be for a celiac orgluten-sensitive person to get ready for a big trip, especially to alocation that doesn't cater to the gluten-free lifestyle.The following tips are geared towardhelping even the most sensitive celiac to have a fun filled andgluten-free vacation while minimizing the stress factor as much aspossible. This article covers the following: preparing for yourgluten-free travel adventure, gluten-free travel by plane,automobile, train or ship, gluten-free accommodations, gluten-freemeals and snacks, what to do if you accidentally ingest gluten.
    Before beginning your vacation, thereare many important things you will want to consider, like method oftravel, your destination, and gluten-free options in the city ortown in which you will be staying. To help find gluten-freeaccommodations and eatery's in your location, perform a “Google”search for 'gluten-free restaurants and accommodations' in the areayou will be traveling to.

    Planes Trains and Automobiles-Tips forGluten-Free Travel by Danna Korn Gluten-Free Transportation
    Traveling by car is the best way totravel, if you have a choice. That way you can stop at stores asneeded and load up on your gluten-free snacks. Trains are also good,because they allow and encourage you to bring your own food on the train. Planesand ships are where it starts to get a little trick, especially if you have a long trip ahead of you.
    Airlines are fairly easy to manage,because you can bring your own food aboard the flight. However,there is a limit to what and how much you are allowed to bringaboard, which can be a problem on a long flight. While many airlinesoffer vegetarian or Kosher options for those with special dietaryneeds, most airlines do not have gluten-free menu options for thoseof us with gluten-intolerance. However, Continental Airlinescurrently offers gluten-free food options. Although, if you areextremely sensitive to cross-contamination, it is still safer tobring your own food.

    More Gluten-Free Airline Travel Tips
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    Royal Caribbean Cruise Orbridge
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    Staying with family or friends can bestressful if they aren't sensitive to your dietary needs. It can alsobe difficult to explain to your friends and loved ones, what it meansfor you to be gluten-free, and who really wants to spend their entirevacation educating the everyone you meet on what it means to beceliac or gluten-sensitive? That could literally take the entirevacation. If cross-contamination is an issue for you and you areconcerned about eating in a gluten based house, the following linkwill help you determine what you need to be free from gluten whileyou are staying with others. It might be a good idea to print theinformation and share it with your host, maybe even emailing them alink with the information, prior to your visit.

    What to do if you can't have agluten-free kitchen Gluten-Free Meals and Snacks
    Finger foods, gluten-freechips/crackers, veggie sticks, gluten-free sandwiches, these are allwonderful foods to keep with you on a trip. Bring as muchgluten-free, shelf-stable food with you as possible. Find out wherethe local farm market is, for fresh and local, organic produce andbuy fresh produce when you arrive at your location.
    Many people getting ready for a trip,will place an order online in advance and have it delivered to thelocation they will be visiting. The Gluten-Free Mall is veryaccommodating and can ship shelf stable food Nationally andInternationally and frozen goods can be shipped within theContinental US. Having a package of gluten-free food delivered toyour location, gives you one less thing to worry about. No extrapacking, or extra luggage, no worries about your food getting crushedor apprehended at customs or tossed out at an airport. It's assimple as placing an order online or by phone.

    Gluten-Free Mall The National Foundation for CeliacAwareness (NFCA) works very hard to train chefs and kitchen staff allacross the globe, on the dos and don't s of cooking gluten-free fortheir guests with extreme gluten sensitivities. Check out the listthey have compiled of of GREAT kitchens that have the stamp ofapproval from NFCA for a possible location near you.

    NFCA GREAT Gluten-Free Kitchens list Unfortunately, not all restaurants havethe GREAT seal of approval from NFCA and the likelihood of one beingat your chosen destination is pretty slim, and finding a dedicated gluten-free restaurants are also rare depending on where you travel. That's why it is important to knowwhat to do when you go out to eat with a group of gluten-eaters.There is a great deal of information on this subject, but here aresome links to get you started.

    How to eat a gluten-free breakfastwhile traveling Eating gluten-free when traveling What to do if you Accidentally Ingest Gluten
    There are varying opinions of what thebest thing to do is when you accidentally ingest gluten, drink gingertea, take laxatives, hot water bottle on the abdomen; there really isno right answer, as everybody is different and has differentreactions to gluten. However, here are some tips that might help ifyou accidentally ingest gluten.

    Accidental Gluten Ingestion What to do if you accidentally eat gluten
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    Connor Burns
    If you have ever traveled to Newport, RI then you know there are plenty of great restaurants to choose from. But if you have celiac disease or a gluten-intolerance then you know that dining out in an unfamiliar city is very difficult. Luckily, Newport has many gluten-free friendly restaurants that can easily be found if you know about them. I have comprised a list of celiac friendly restaurants in this scenic, colonial city. These restaurants have responded to a survey that was sent to over 100 restaurants and bakeries in Newport. All of the places listed have also stated that they are familiar with the necessary precautions that come with preparing gluten-free food such as avoiding cross-contamination. I have attempted to verify the accuracy of the statements provided by the restaurants to the best of my ability. If you are a tourist or local, I hope this list can help in keeping your gluten-free lifestyle.

    Places that offer gluten-free menus:
    Brick Alley Pub
    140 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-6334
    www.BrickAlley.comEva Ruth's Specialty Bakery
    796 Aquidneck Avenue Middletown, RI
    (401) 619-1924
    www.EvaRuths.com
    * Eva Ruth's is located 10 minutes out of downtown Newport and specializes in making only gluten-free products.
    O'Briens Pub
    501 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-6623
    www.theobrienspub.com
    Safari Room at Ocean Cliff (Sunday brunch menu)
    65 Ridge Road Newport, RI
    (401) 849-4873
    www.newportexperience.com
    Tucker's Bistro
    150 Broadway Newport, RI
    (401) 846-3449
    www.tuckersbistro.com
    Yesterday's and the Place
    28 Washington Square Newport, RI
    (401) 847-0116
    www.yesterdaysandtheplace.com

    Places that are familiar with gluten-free foods and offer gluten-free options:
    A Little Café
    27 Connell Highway Newport, RI
    (401) 849-0123
    www.Alittlecafe.usBouchard Restaurant and Inn
    505 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 846-0123
    www.bouchardnewport.com
    Callahan's Café Zelda
    528 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-4002
    www.cafezelda.com
    Castle Hill Inn
    590 Ocean Drive Newport, RI
    (401) 324-4522
    www.castlehillinn.com
    * Castle Hill Inn is working with Eva Ruth's bakery to offer more gluten-free options.
    Diego's
    11 Bowen's Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 619-2640
    www.diegosnewport.com
    Fathoms Restaurant at the Newport Marriott
    25 Americas Cup Avenue Newport, RI
    (401) 849-7788
    Fluke Wine Bar and Kitchen
    41 Bowens Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 849-7778
    www.flukewinebar.com
    Gas Lamp Grille
    206 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 845-9300
    www.gaslampgrille.com
    * Gas Lamp Grille is in the process of creating a gluten-free menu.
    It's My Party Bake Shoppe
    84 William Street Newport, RI
    (401) 619-4600
    www.itsmypartynewport.com
    * Must call in advance to place an order for gluten-free products at It's My Party Bake Shoppe.
    Lucia Italian Restaurant
    186 B Thames Street Newport RI
    (401) 846-4477
    www.luciarestaurant.com
    Mamma Luisa Restaurant
    673 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 848-5257
    www.mammaluisa.com
    SAPO Freaky Burrito
    16 Broadway Newport, RI
    (401) 847-1526
    www.freakyburrito.com
    Sardellas Restaurant
    30 Memorial Boulevard W Newport, RI
    (401) 849-6312
    www.sardellas.com
    * Sardella's carries gluten-free pasta, but it is recommended that you call in first to make sure that they have it in stock.
    Sushi-go
    215 Goddard Row Newport, RI
    (401) 849-5155
    www.sushi-go.com
    Tallulah on Thames
    464 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-2433
    www.Tallulahonthames.com
    The Barking Crab Restaurant
    151 Swinburne Row Newport, RI
    (617) 206-8294
    www.barkingcrab.com
    The Mooring Seafood Kitchen
    1 Sayer's Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 846-2260
    www.mooringrestaurant.com
    The Smokehouse Café
    31 Scotts Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 848-9800
    The White Horse Tavern
    26 Marlborough Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-3600
    www.whitehorsetavern.us
    *Some of these restaurants may only offer naturally gluten-free items, but will be more than willing to accommodate any changes to their options if asked


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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com