• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,337
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Lovisa
    Newest Member
    Lovisa
    Joined
  • 0

    Gluten-free Dining in Newport, RI


    Connor Burns
    Image Caption: The Brick Alley Pub in Newport, RI

    If you have ever traveled to Newport, RI then you know there are plenty of great restaurants to choose from. But if you have celiac disease or a gluten-intolerance then you know that dining out in an unfamiliar city is very difficult. Luckily, Newport has many gluten-free friendly restaurants that can easily be found if you know about them. I have comprised a list of celiac friendly restaurants in this scenic, colonial city. These restaurants have responded to a survey that was sent to over 100 restaurants and bakeries in Newport. All of the places listed have also stated that they are familiar with the necessary precautions that come with preparing gluten-free food such as avoiding cross-contamination. I have attempted to verify the accuracy of the statements provided by the restaurants to the best of my ability. If you are a tourist or local, I hope this list can help in keeping your gluten-free lifestyle.

    Places that offer gluten-free menus:

    Brick Alley Pub
    140 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-6334
    www.BrickAlley.com


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    Eva Ruth's Specialty Bakery
    796 Aquidneck Avenue Middletown, RI
    (401) 619-1924
    www.EvaRuths.com
    * Eva Ruth's is located 10 minutes out of downtown Newport and specializes in making only gluten-free products.

    O'Briens Pub
    501 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-6623
    www.theobrienspub.com

    Safari Room at Ocean Cliff (Sunday brunch menu)
    65 Ridge Road Newport, RI
    (401) 849-4873
    www.newportexperience.com

    Tucker's Bistro
    150 Broadway Newport, RI
    (401) 846-3449
    www.tuckersbistro.com

    Yesterday's and the Place
    28 Washington Square Newport, RI
    (401) 847-0116
    www.yesterdaysandtheplace.com

    Places that are familiar with gluten-free foods and offer gluten-free options:

    A Little Café
    27 Connell Highway Newport, RI
    (401) 849-0123
    www.Alittlecafe.us

    Bouchard Restaurant and Inn
    505 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 846-0123
    www.bouchardnewport.com

    Callahan's Café Zelda
    528 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-4002
    www.cafezelda.com

    Castle Hill Inn
    590 Ocean Drive Newport, RI
    (401) 324-4522
    www.castlehillinn.com
    * Castle Hill Inn is working with Eva Ruth's bakery to offer more gluten-free options.

    Diego's
    11 Bowen's Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 619-2640
    www.diegosnewport.com

    Fathoms Restaurant at the Newport Marriott
    25 Americas Cup Avenue Newport, RI
    (401) 849-7788

    Fluke Wine Bar and Kitchen
    41 Bowens Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 849-7778
    www.flukewinebar.com

    Gas Lamp Grille
    206 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 845-9300
    www.gaslampgrille.com
    * Gas Lamp Grille is in the process of creating a gluten-free menu.

    It's My Party Bake Shoppe
    84 William Street Newport, RI
    (401) 619-4600
    www.itsmypartynewport.com
    * Must call in advance to place an order for gluten-free products at It's My Party Bake Shoppe.

    Lucia Italian Restaurant
    186 B Thames Street Newport RI
    (401) 846-4477
    www.luciarestaurant.com

    Mamma Luisa Restaurant
    673 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 848-5257
    www.mammaluisa.com

    SAPO Freaky Burrito
    16 Broadway Newport, RI
    (401) 847-1526
    www.freakyburrito.com

    Sardellas Restaurant
    30 Memorial Boulevard W Newport, RI
    (401) 849-6312
    www.sardellas.com
    * Sardella's carries gluten-free pasta, but it is recommended that you call in first to make sure that they have it in stock.

    Sushi-go
    215 Goddard Row Newport, RI
    (401) 849-5155
    www.sushi-go.com

    Tallulah on Thames
    464 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-2433
    www.Tallulahonthames.com

    The Barking Crab Restaurant
    151 Swinburne Row Newport, RI
    (617) 206-8294
    www.barkingcrab.com

    The Mooring Seafood Kitchen
    1 Sayer's Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 846-2260
    www.mooringrestaurant.com

    The Smokehouse Café
    31 Scotts Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 848-9800

    The White Horse Tavern
    26 Marlborough Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-3600
    www.whitehorsetavern.us
    *Some of these restaurants may only offer naturally gluten-free items, but will be more than willing to accommodate any changes to their options if asked

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest Jennifer Irwin

    Posted

    Conner,

    Great article! Thank you for doing all the homework for me. This is very helpful as we just moved to Newport.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Conner,

    Thanks for this! There are some restaurants on here that I did not know are gluten free friendly.

     

    To add to your list: Salvation Cafe, Perro Salado, The Fifth Element, and Pour Judgement all have been very accommodating and aware of the needs of a gluten free diet. These restaurants are some of my favorites and my go-tos.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Thanks for the info!!

     

    Diego's now has a special gluten-free menu that is quite extensive. I had the gluten-free fish tacos, and they were delicious - and didn't make me sick so i know they really were gluten-free.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Cathey

    Posted

    Just got back from Newport, Diego's is wonderful they are very knowledgeable and know all ingredients in there food. Eva Ruth's makes the best fresh bakery item I've ever had (try the biscotti, pumpkin muffins and cookies).

    Also accommodating restaurants to try Red Parrot and Benjamin's. Thanks for the article it was a huge help.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Very helpful...it's hard to find these restaurants. I did not know about this site. Thank you.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I live in Newport so these are recommendations from my experience. My 2 favorite restaurants who have dedicated gluten-free menus & in my experience are careful with Celiacs: 1) Diego's (diegosnewport.com) - they have a separate frialator for gluten-free even though they change the regular one every day. (Diego's restaurant opened Diego's Bodega (www.diegosmiddletown.com) for take-out and though I've never had a reaction I feel they are less careful/knowledgeable than the main restaurant) 2) The Fifth Element (thefifthri.com) - have the BEST gluten-free pizza and they are even careful about blue-cheese last time I went! Others with gluten-free menu's or accommodate gluten-free (in no particular order) The Mooring, 22 Bowen's, the Smokehouse, and probably all of the other Newport Restaurant Group restaurants Salvation Cafe (amazing gluten-free french toast & pad thai!) Pour Judgement fancy places like Castle Hill, Bouchard's, The White Horse Tavern, Ocean Cliff, Spiced Pear Raw Power Juice (www.rawpowerjuicebarnewportri.com) - falafel, wraps, salads & smoothies A-Market - grocery store with prepared foods & hot soups. List all ingredients and Gluten-free is marked bold. myamarket.com Keenwah - breakfast & lunch. affiliated with A-Market (311 Broadway, Newport, RI. does not have website, visit on Facebook) Lucia's Italian Restaurant - gluten-free pasta Sardellas - gluten-free pasta Tavern on Broadway Caleb & Broad Gas Lamp Grille (gluten-free menu, but bar-food level) Brix - part of Newport Vineyards in Middletown (www.newportvineyards.com/brix-restaurant) These places have permanently closed (so sad because they were all fantastic!!): Eva Ruth's Yesterday's and the Place Tallulah on Thames - but check out the freshest authentic gluten-free tacos at Tallulah Tacos at the Shack in Jamestown

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   20 Members, 1 Anonymous, 1,099 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Phyllis Morrow
    Celiac.com 04/29/2008 - We were unloading our rafting gear at Lee’s Ferry, about to plunge into a 19 day private (self-guided) trip on the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. Very hungry after a long travel day, people were happily handing around the pizzas that they had picked up en route. I was walking back towards the pick-up truck, looking forward to the gluten-free supper of stuffed grape leaves, rice and salad that I’d stashed on the front seat. My anxieties had been crowding around me all day long, shoving each other like a bunch of rowdy teenagers. I was nervous about big water, scorpions, rattlesnakes, rock scrambling, new traveling companions and, of course, food. To my dismay, the truck was gone, off on a distant errand in town. Suddenly, one, lone sniveling child of an emotion stepped out in front of the others. “You’re going to starve,” she whimpered. Turning my back so my fellow travelers couldn’t see my distress, I felt tears run down my face. Rationally, I knew that the pick-up would be back in a few hours. I knew, too, that the boxes and boxes of food that I had helped to select would arrive later that evening. But at that hungry moment, desolation and self-pity threatened to overwhelm me. 
    It can feel scary to venture away from the familiar settings in which you have a high degree of food control. But outdoor activities – and outdoor eating – are too much fun to pass up. With a positive attitude, smart planning, and a measure of trust, you can get out and enjoy camping, hiking, biking, boating and picnicking. That day on the banks of the Colorado, I gently prodded my hunger back into the crowd of emotions, scrounged around for some nuts, and, yes, survived until my dinner returned.  Over the next 220 miles of rocks and rapids, I turned my mind to other thrills and chills. And I had plenty to eat.
    While not always in such remote surroundings, I regularly enjoy a wide variety of outdoor activities and have, over the years, developed some strategies for going gluten-free from the mountains to the sea. Here are some suggestions that will variously serve from the local state park to the Grand Canyon and the Alaskan backcountry.
    First, preparing and eating gluten-free foods outdoors comes with a particular set of challenges. Here are some things to consider.

    Control over food selection – from choosing the menus to purchasing food and beverages – can be especially problematic if your trip takes you far from the road and the grocery store. Unless you plan to trap rabbits and eat wild greens, you’ll need to make sure that you have enough gluten-free food for the duration. Keeping cooking surfaces, eating surfaces, and utensils free of gluten contamination takes care when you have little or no hot running water. Fellow travelers need to be educated about your needs. That’s important whether they are sharing cooking duty or just helping you keep some ravenous 12-year old from eating up all of the gluten-free cookies (that inexplicably look more delicious than the Oreos packed for the rest of the group). Depending on the type of trip, more general food restrictions, such as concerns about perishability or weight, may compound your gluten restriction by narrowing the choice of what you can bring. Packing gluten-free baked items (bread, crackers, cookies) takes special care because of their comparative fragility. The ability to access your gluten-free food items requires logistical packing decisions; you need to be able to find your dinner for day one on day one, not buried at the bottom of the supplies with items that nobody plans to excavate until day six. Accidents and moments of disappointment are bound to occur. Imagine the “oh no” second when someone bumps your elbow just as you are about to tuck into the one and only gluten-free bowl of chili. You watch your lunch cascade, as if in slow motion, into the dirt. At some point, you can expect someone to absent-mindedly put a gluten-contaminated knife in the jam. You can figure on a meal where you belatedly discover gluten on an ingredient label although the cook assured you that you could eat “everything” he prepared.
    Don’t be daunted. I’ll give some suggestions for dealing with all of these challenges. But let’s start with overall approaches to food planning:
    Using a separatist approach, you can plan your own menu and essentially eat apart from others. Depending on the duration and complexity of the planned trip, this can be a simple alternative that guarantees you full control over what you eat. For example, I just did a cross-country ski day trip with friends and we each packed our own sandwiches. I brought some gluten-free chocolate cake and a thermos of tea to share, and my friends shared their carrot sticks and nuts. Bingo, everyone was happy and felt sociable. Separatism is generally not a good approach on a multi-day trip, though, where people plan to cook together. For one thing, separate planning and preparation mean duplication of effort. Worse, you’ll be left out of the social interaction of cooking in camp and you may feel like a leper when everyone else sits down to some delicious meal and you are trying to make the best out of a reconstituted cup of gluten-free dried soup mix. A second option is to make the outing gluten-free for everyone. This works well if you have the time and the skills to take the lead in arranging food. If you have good taste and are a competent trip/food planner, nobody will be the wiser and, in fact, they’ll generally appreciate having you do the work. Since other people don’t think about gluten one way or the other, they certainly won’t care that they are using mustard or ketchup or soy sauce that happens to be gluten-free. They’ll be perfectly happy with meals based on rice, potatoes, corn tortillas, gluten-free pancake mix, brownies and other gluten-free foods. Tasty and filling meals make most people happy, and unless they are unreasonable (in which case you shouldn’t invite them along next time) they won’t get bent out of shape if they can’t have their favorite brand of sausage in the morning. Bread is the obvious exception, since few gluten-free breads meet the criterion of “I can’t tell the difference.” So have someone else bring the bread, if that’s an issue. A third, often very practical, option falls somewhere between these two extremes. In this case, you participate in the menu planning and make sure that as many staples and other items as possible are gluten-free (e.g., peanut butter, condiments, canned goods). Where planned meals call for some gluten-containing items, you provide gluten-free equivalents for yourself. You label each item visibly (e.g., a masking tape label with black permanent marker reading “Gluten-free Bagel for Susie”) and pack it so that it will be accessible for the appropriate meal. So you make sure that the spaghetti sauce purchased for the entire group is gluten-free but you include a package of gluten-free pasta for your own meal. You bring your own bread, cookies, cereal and crackers for all meals and snacks. You also participate in cooking so that you can avoid cross-contamination and, where necessary, set portions aside before gluten-containing ingredients are added. For example, if everyone else wants their fresh trout dredged in flour, you just reserve your portion, dredge it in cornmeal, and fry it in a separate pan. You also request to serve yourself first before others accidentally contaminate a dish.
    The Grand Canyon trip that I mentioned at the start was one of two that I have taken where I had to trust strangers to provision the group. Although we guided our own trip, we hired professional outfitters to supply the rafts and food. In that situation, I consulted extensively on the menu choices and requested that processed foods be kept at a minimum; instead I asked that they supply mostly basic ingredients (fruits, vegetables, eggs, butter, cheese). I also asked if items would be in their original packages so that I could check labels for gluten. I brought a variety of gluten-free starches to supplement and substitute for items on the planned menu. I picked up gluten-free snacks at a Trader Joe’s – more than I needed, in the end. The kids with us were thrilled when, after having consistently shooed them away from my goodies, I was able to generously share them towards the end of our time together.The second trip provisioned by strangers turned out to be an unexpectedly relaxed and gourmet experience for me. In this case, it was not possible for me to participate directly in the food planning. But I was touched and surprised by the kindness and care of my traveling companions. I found out that the two men who had volunteered to take food responsibility were doctors (as well as fine cooks). A phone conversation and e-mail exchange during the planning period reassured me that they understood about celiac disease. They went out of their way to make meals that were safe and delicious. There was another unexpected benefit to that trip. A physician’s assistant who was also with us contacted me a few weeks after we all returned home. She told me that having just traveled with me made her pick up on some likely symptoms in a young patient. A celiac diagnosis was confirmed, and she had called to ask for some advice on contacts and reliable sources of information, which she passed on to the patient.
    Implicitly, I’ve brought up the need to educate your fellow travelers here. In general, it’s a good idea both to describe your gluten-free needs in advance and to participate in cooking and clean-up during the trip. Unless and until you can trust that other cooks and food-handlers “get it,” you’ll want to be in or near the food action most of the time. There, you can demonstrate what’s required, take care of cooking portions separately when necessary and serve your own food. While maintaining a scrupulously uncontaminated washing environment is tough while camping, I strongly suggest that you at least reserve one cooking pot for water only. That pot will never get pasta residue or other gluten scraps stuck to the bottom and you will always have a source of clean hot water for cooking (i.e., for hot beverages or adding to instant foods) and washing up. The others may appreciate this rule, too, since it will prevent their morning hot chocolate from having oatmeal or bits of last night’s curried lentils floating in it!  If you are lucky enough to have a pre-educated friend along, or if your traveling companions are quick and considerate learners, at times you’ll be able to relax your vigilance. Whenever my husband is cooking or washing-up, for example, I can go help out with other chores – or sit down with a glass of wine and a book.
    Because your companions are likely to be gluten-oblivious, though, you can expect an occasional mishap. For those moments of disappointment, when your dinner has just been ruined or has driven off in the cab of the pick-up truck, you should keep an easy meal in reserve. Make it something that you like (how about that Annie’s gluten-free Mac and Cheese?) so that you don’t feel too deprived. Or set aside a favorite dessert so that if you have to make do with a minimal supper you can at least have a special sweet.
    Whether you are supplying your own food or relying primarily on others, a few tricks will help you keep your edibles edible.  There are things that I always carry with me: at least one thin, flexible plastic cutting board; one or two plastic containers; and a set of utensils. The light plastic cutting board allows you to create an instant clean surface for food preparation or consumption anywhere you go. In fact, I keep one or two in my suitcase for ordinary travel and they are also essential in my home kitchen.  If the mats you purchase are too large for convenience, cut them down to a size (6” x 8” or 8” x 11”) that fits easily into your backpack, bike pannier, or food box. They are so flat that they take up virtually no space and you’ll have solved the problem of gluten-y picnic tables (or airline trays or food court counters, for that matter). The mats are very easy to wash, rinse and dry and can be kept clean in a plastic bag for the next use; you might want to size yours to fit into a half-gallon Ziploc bag. Having your own set of utensils is useful for obvious reasons, but for camping and picnics a good pocketknife is essential. When someone else takes out his or her knife to cut food for everyone, volunteer yours for the purpose, since you can be sure it’s gluten-free. Plastic containers will help you keep your gluten-free baked goods intact, particularly if you try to pack them just tightly enough that the goods will not rattle around inside. I find a couple of sandwich-sized plastic containers very useful, as well as a few others of assorted sizes. Small containers that fit into a waist pack or day pack will protect your lunch much better than a plastic bag. Mark your containers “Gluten-free foods only” so that they do not become mixed up with containers for general food storage.
    There is one caution about keeping your foods separate that I can illustrate with a little story. On one overnight biking/camping trip, I forgot to remove my gluten-free snack bars from my bicycle pannier. When I saddled up the next morning, I discovered that small campground thieves (probably squirrels) had chewed right through the fabric to get at them. My bag was ruined, but at least we weren’t camping in bear country that night…a reminder that wild animals are just as happy to eat gluten-free as anything else.
    Camping foods usually need to be relatively compact even if you have the luxury of carrying a lot (in a car, RV, motorboat or raft). Weight is, of course, an additional issue if you are backpacking, bicycling, or kayaking. Depending on which activity you’re doing, you can pick and choose among some of these easy options:

    Trail mix: It’s a snap to make your own with gluten-free dried fruits, nuts, coconut, chocolate chips, and/or gluten-free cereal. Just use care in your selections. For example, while whole dates are usually gluten-free, chopped dates are often dusted in barley flour so that they will not stick together. Snack bars/energy bars: Take some of your favorites (check the nutrition/health food section of your grocery store as there are an increasing number of possibilities out there) or, if you are so inclined, you can even make your own granola bars based on gluten-free granola, such as Bakery on Main or Trader Joe’s brands, or by using gluten-free rolled oats. Boil-in-bag foods and pre-cooked foods: If weight is not an issue, these are convenient and non-perishable. Heat up a pan of water, slip in the pouch, cut it open and eat: if you are worried about keeping pans clean, this completely solves any cross-contamination problem. Tasty Bite makes a variety of gluten-free Indian and Thai foods packaged in “smart pouches.”  They are commonly available in regular grocery stores. To save packing room, toss out the boxes at home and bring only the pouches, but be sure to label them with a permanent marker if the pouches do not have the contents printed on them, since they will all look alike. Pre-cooked polenta rolls are similarly convenient. Instant cereal: For gluten-loving campers, instant oatmeal in individual serving packs is a standard breakfast item. I don’t know of anyone marketing gluten-free oats this way, but an equivalent for gluten-free campers is quinoa instant hot cereal, similarly packaged (Altiplano Gold makes several flavors that can be ordered on-line). You can also pre-measure quick-cooking cereal, such as rice cereal, in Ziploc bags with a little salt and flavorings (cinnamon, sugar, etc.) of your choice. Pre-measure in the drinking cup that you plan to bring camping with you. Then you can use the same cup to measure water proportionately. I use the same method for measuring and packing other dried foods such as rice, quinoa, or polenta, often including herbs and spices: mark the contents, amount of water needed, and cooking time on the plastic bag. Cured or dried meats: Freybe makes salami-type sausages that are compact and keep well. Shelton makes gluten-free turkey jerky. Though quite expensive, it is very lightweight. S’mores: A facsimile of everybody’s camping favorite is easy to make. Marshmallows are typically gluten-free (find a brand that is labeled as such), as are plain Hershey’s chocolate bars. Substituting gluten-free cookies for graham crackers makes gluten-free s’mores even more decadent than the originals. Dried foods:  A variety of dried foods, such as bean flakes, potato flakes, and vegetables are available in gluten-free versions and make packing light and camp cooking quick. As always, you need to read labels. Rice (including brown rice) that has been partially pre-cooked and dried does not take long to prepare. If you are using a small camp stove, quick-cooking items save on fuel weight, too. Dutch oven baked goods: If your trip is such that you can carry an aluminum (lighter than cast iron) Dutch oven and some charcoal, you can turn out cornbread, brownies, and cakes that will make you the hit of the crowd. Bring your favorite gluten-free mixes, or mix up your own dry ingredients from your favorite recipes. Don’t forget to bring the necessary wet ingredients, too, of course. Search for Dutch oven camping recipes on-line to learn the basic technique. It’s not hard.
    Okay, now you have no excuses not to get out there. Have a great gluten-free summer and remember that getting active and outdoors is as important as eating well.

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 05/20/2010 - The weather is getting warm and it's almost that time again-time to go camping! Camping is supposed to be relaxing and fun. Most people camp to escape the monotony of the daily rut, and to get back to the basics. Eating gluten-free while camping is really easy, once you know what to bring and what to avoid.
    Camping trips usually consist of the same easy to prepare foods. Chili, pasta, canned soups, hot chocolate, sandwiches, hot cereal, trail mix and  s'mores are the high-lights of most camping meals. All of those things can easily be prepared gluten-free. In fact, many gluten-free already prepared foods can be used for camping trips. Anything canned or boxed that you normally enjoy at home, can typically be converted to camping food.
    It is important to eat the perishable foods first. A  camping trip lasting for more than one night can render perishable foods inedible. That's why it's important to eat  refrigerated food on the first day or two, and save the shelf-stable food for the remainder of the trip. Store  perishables in a cooler with plenty of ice and/or cold packs. To grill gluten-free food,  avoid gluten contamination by using a grill from home. Using the grill provided at the camping site is possible, but using aluminum foil or a pan as a buffer  will keep food away from gluten contamination. There are even special racks with ridges that can be placed on the the grill and will keep food from touching the grill.

    Two Day Sample Meal Plan (everything should be gluten-free):
    Day 1-
    Breakfast- Pancakes with fresh berries and real maple syrup Snack- Energy Bars Lunch- Sandwiches with gluten-free bread Snack- Carrots & celery sticks Dinner- Instant mashed potatoes, instant gravy, grilled meat and/or veggies.  Dessert- S'mores (see recipe below)
    Day 2-
    Breakfast- Hot cereal with fresh berries or raisins Snack- Trail mix  Lunch- Sandwiches Snack- Jerky Dinner- Chili, hot dogs,  buns, canned vegetables Dessert-  hot chocolate
    Make sure to buy all gluten-free products. Don't forget the gluten-free sunscreen and the gluten-free insect repellent.
    Gluten-Free S'mores Recipe
    Ingredients
    Gluten-free marshmallows Gluten-free graham crackers Gluten-free chocolate bars
    To Make
    1. Put your marshmallow on a fire safe skewer. Heat the marshmallow over an open flame until it begins to brown and melt.
    2. Break the graham cracker in half. Sandwich the chocolate between the cracker and the hot marshmallow. Allow the chocolate to melt and the marshmallow to cool a moment before eating.
    3. Add strawberries or other gluten-free favorites.Happy Trails!


    Melanie Weir
    Celiac.com 04/16/2012 - Can I eat our at restaurants if I’m on a gluten-free diet?
    Eating out gluten-free is not as easy as it seems.  If you Google "gluten-free restaurants," your bound to find a selection of gluten-free menus and gluten-free yelp reviews.  However, a global definition for gluten-free does not exist in the restaurant world.
    Many times, restaurants, bakeries and deli’s offer gluten-free options like salads (with menu side notes like: order salad without croutons or order meat without bread).  If we define gluten-free as less than 20ppm, then the following factors must be followed to ensure safety from gluten contamination (please note this is only a partial list):
    Eating Salads Out

    Use of a Separate Strainer: Using a strainer that has been used for pastas or other gluten products, can result in cross contamination. Salad Dressing: Many salad dressing utilize gluten containing ingredients like malt vinegar, spices, natural flavorings, wheat, etc. Vegetable Chopping Board: A vegetable chopping board must either be completely sterilized or a gluten-free dedicated board must be used. Knife: Knife must be sterilized with heat before being used on gluten-free ingredients. Prep Area: Salad prep stations are often housed beneath shelves filled with bread.  If bread is stored above the salad prep area, then the area cannot be safely maintained as gluten-free.  On an additional note, croutons and other gluten products should not be allowed in the gluten-free prep area (1/6th of a bread crumb is all it takes to be contaminated with gluten). Salad Toppings: If a topping like chicken, nuts, tofu, peppers or onions are sautéd or prepared on a grill, then the grill and the ingredients must be maintained as gluten-free. Gluten-Free on the Grill
    A grill must be cleaned before a gluten-free product is cooked on it. A separate area for gluten free foods to be cooked is ideal, but not always possible in restaurant settings. Many meats are marinated in sauces containing gluten before they are cooked. Gluten Free Pizza & Bakery Products
    If an exhaust fan is used in the oven, a screen must be used. Pizza toppings for gluten free pizza should be housed in a separate area. Cannot be prepared in a facility that uses gluten containing flours, because flour dust in the air settles on food. Mixing utensils, wooden spoons, scrapes in bowls and cutting boards must be sterile or maintained for just gluten-free products.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/02/2015 - Consider the real estate saying about: Location, location, location. Now, ask yourself how far would you go for a good gluten-free pizza?
    Or, alternatively, imagine yourself out in the middle nowhere, the middle of the pacific ocean, say, and ask yourself how over-the-top happy would you be to discover a floating bar serving cold beverages and wood-fired gluten-free pizzas?
    I'm guessing you would be very happy. You might even say you were on "Cloud 9." And, if you happened to be in Fiji, you would be correct.
    For Cloud 9 is the name for a bar and restaurant that floats off the west coast of the pacific island of Fiji, boasting a full bar, and wood fired Italian-style pizzas, including, yes, gluten-free pizzas.
    So, if you're lucky enough to find yourself in Fiji, and catch a boat or jet ski tour from the main island of Viti Levu, you can reach the picturesque oasis in about 45 minutes.
    Once there, you can take a seat at the bar, or grab a daybed or hanging chair. Feel free to plunge off the deck at any time and splash and frolic in the crystal clear blue water, while your gluten-free pizza cooks to perfection.
    Sipping your beverage of choice, nibbling away pizza as you ponder the sunny azure splendor of it all, I'm sure you'll feel that your pizza is, if the not best in the world, very much the most amazing.
    Cloud 9 even has DJs on the weekend and can accommodate weddings.
    For more information on Cloud9, including information on transportation from Fiji, check out the Cloud9 website.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
    Ingredients:
    3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Purée all ingredients together in a blender.
    Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. 
    Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as desired. 
    Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 06/15/2018 - There seems to be widespread agreement in the published medical research reports that stuttering is driven by abnormalities in the brain. Sometimes these are the result of brain injuries resulting from a stroke. Other types of brain injuries can also result in stuttering. Patients with Parkinson’s disease who were treated with stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, an area of the brain that regulates some motor functions, experienced a return or worsening of stuttering that improved when the stimulation was turned off (1). Similarly, stroke has also been reported in association with acquired stuttering (2). While there are some reports of psychological mechanisms underlying stuttering, a majority of reports seem to favor altered brain morphology and/or function as the root of stuttering (3). Reports of structural differences between the brain hemispheres that are absent in those who do not stutter are also common (4). About 5% of children stutter, beginning sometime around age 3, during the phase of speech acquisition. However, about 75% of these cases resolve without intervention, before reaching their teens (5). Some cases of aphasia, a loss of speech production or understanding, have been reported in association with damage or changes to one or more of the language centers of the brain (6). Stuttering may sometimes arise from changes or damage to these same language centers (7). Thus, many stutterers have abnormalities in the same regions of the brain similar to those seen in aphasia.
    So how, you may ask, is all this related to gluten? As a starting point, one report from the medical literature identifies a patient who developed aphasia after admission for severe diarrhea. By the time celiac disease was diagnosed, he had completely lost his faculty of speech. However, his speech and normal bowel function gradually returned after beginning a gluten free diet (8). This finding was so controversial at the time of publication (1988) that the authors chose to remain anonymous. Nonetheless, it is a valuable clue that suggests gluten as a factor in compromised speech production. At about the same time (late 1980’s) reports of connections between untreated celiac disease and seizures/epilepsy were emerging in the medical literature (9).
    With the advent of the Internet a whole new field of anecdotal information was emerging, connecting a variety of neurological symptoms to celiac disease. While many medical practitioners and researchers were casting aspersions on these assertions, a select few chose to explore such claims using scientific research designs and methods. While connections between stuttering and gluten consumption seem to have been overlooked by the medical research community, there is a rich literature on the Internet that cries out for more structured investigation of this connection. Conversely, perhaps a publication bias of the peer review process excludes work that explores this connection.
    Whatever the reason that stuttering has not been reported in the medical literature in association with gluten ingestion, a number of personal disclosures and comments suggesting a connection between gluten and stuttering can be found on the Internet. Abid Hussain, in an article about food allergy and stuttering said: “The most common food allergy prevalent in stutterers is that of gluten which has been found to aggravate the stutter” (10). Similarly, Craig Forsythe posted an article that includes five cases of self-reporting individuals who believe that their stuttering is or was connected to gluten, one of whom also experiences stuttering from foods containing yeast (11). The same site contains one report of a stutterer who has had no relief despite following a gluten free diet for 20 years (11). Another stutterer, Jay88, reports the complete disappearance of her/his stammer on a gluten free diet (12). Doubtless there are many more such anecdotes to be found on the Internet* but we have to question them, exercising more skepticism than we might when reading similar claims in a peer reviewed scientific or medical journal.
    There are many reports in such journals connecting brain and neurological ailments with gluten, so it is not much of a stretch, on that basis alone, to suspect that stuttering may be a symptom of the gluten syndrome. Rodney Ford has even characterized celiac disease as an ailment that may begin through gluten-induced neurological damage (13) and Marios Hadjivassiliou and his group of neurologists and neurological investigators have devoted considerable time and effort to research that reveals gluten as an important factor in a majority of neurological diseases of unknown origin (14) which, as I have pointed out previously, includes most neurological ailments.
    My own experience with stuttering is limited. I stuttered as a child when I became nervous, upset, or self-conscious. Although I have been gluten free for many years, I haven’t noticed any impact on my inclination to stutter when upset. I don’t know if they are related, but I have also had challenges with speaking when distressed and I have noticed a substantial improvement in this area since removing gluten from my diet. Nonetheless, I have long wondered if there is a connection between gluten consumption and stuttering. Having done the research for this article, I would now encourage stutterers to try a gluten free diet for six months to see if it will reduce or eliminate their stutter. Meanwhile, I hope that some investigator out there will research this matter, publish her findings, and start the ball rolling toward getting some definitive answers to this question.
    Sources:
    1. Toft M, Dietrichs E. Aggravated stuttering following subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease--two cases. BMC Neurol. 2011 Apr 8;11:44.
    2. Tani T, Sakai Y. Stuttering after right cerebellar infarction: a case study. J Fluency Disord. 2010 Jun;35(2):141-5. Epub 2010 Mar 15.
    3. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    4. Jäncke L, Hänggi J, Steinmetz H. Morphological brain differences between adult stutterers and non-stutterers. BMC Neurol. 2004 Dec 10;4(1):23.
    5. Kell CA, Neumann K, von Kriegstein K, Posenenske C, von Gudenberg AW, Euler H, Giraud AL. How the brain repairs stuttering. Brain. 2009 Oct;132(Pt 10):2747-60. Epub 2009 Aug 26.
    6. Galantucci S, Tartaglia MC, Wilson SM, Henry ML, Filippi M, Agosta F, Dronkers NF, Henry RG, Ogar JM, Miller BL, Gorno-Tempini ML. White matter damage in primary progressive aphasias: a diffusion tensor tractography study. Brain. 2011 Jun 11.
    7. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    8. [No authors listed] Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia. N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48
    9. Molteni N, Bardella MT, Baldassarri AR, Bianchi PA. Celiac disease associated with epilepsy and intracranial calcifications: report of two patients. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988 Sep;83(9):992-4.
    10. http://ezinearticles.com/?Food-Allergy-and-Stuttering-Link&id=1235725 
    11. http://www.craig.copperleife.com/health/stuttering_allergies.htm 
    12. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/73362-any-help-is-appreciated/
    13. Ford RP. The gluten syndrome: a neurological disease. Med Hypotheses. 2009 Sep;73(3):438-40. Epub 2009 Apr 29.
    14. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/14/2018 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) is a rare complication of celiac disease that has high death rates. To diagnose RCDII, doctors identify a clonal population of phenotypically aberrant intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). 
    However, researchers really don’t have much data regarding the frequency and significance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. Such data could provide useful comparison information for patients with RCDII, among other things.
    To that end, a research team recently set out to try to get some information about the frequency and importance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. The research team included Shafinaz Hussein, Tatyana Gindin, Stephen M Lagana, Carolina Arguelles-Grande, Suneeta Krishnareddy, Bachir Alobeid, Suzanne K Lewis, Mahesh M Mansukhani, Peter H R Green, and Govind Bhagat.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, and the Department of Medicine at the Celiac Disease Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA. Their team analyzed results of TCR-GR analyses performed on SB biopsies at our institution over a 3-year period, which were obtained from eight active celiac disease, 172 celiac disease on gluten-free diet, 33 RCDI, and three RCDII patients and 14 patients without celiac disease. 
    Clonal TCR-GRs are not infrequent in cases lacking features of RCDII, while PCPs are frequent in all disease phases. TCR-GR results should be assessed in conjunction with immunophenotypic, histological and clinical findings for appropriate diagnosis and classification of RCD.
    The team divided the TCR-GR patterns into clonal, polyclonal and prominent clonal peaks (PCPs), and correlated these patterns with clinical and pathological features. In all, they detected clonal TCR-GR products in biopsies from 67% of patients with RCDII, 17% of patients with RCDI and 6% of patients with gluten-free diet. They found PCPs in all disease phases, but saw no significant difference in the TCR-GR patterns between the non-RCDII disease categories (p=0.39). 
    They also noted a higher frequency of surface CD3(−) IELs in cases with clonal TCR-GR, but the PCP pattern showed no associations with any clinical or pathological feature. 
    Repeat biopsy showed that the clonal or PCP pattern persisted for up to 2 years with no evidence of RCDII. The study indicates that better understanding of clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements may help researchers improve refractory celiac diagnosis. 
    Source:
    Journal of Clinical Pathologyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jclinpath-2018-205023

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/13/2018 - There have been numerous reports that olmesartan, aka Benicar, seems to trigger sprue‐like enteropathy in many patients, but so far, studies have produced mixed results, and there really hasn’t been a rigorous study of the issue. A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether olmesartan is associated with a higher rate of enteropathy compared with other angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).
    The research team included Y.‐H. Dong; Y. Jin; TN Tsacogianis; M He; PH Hsieh; and JJ Gagne. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, USA; the Faculty of Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Science at National Yang‐Ming University in Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Hepato‐Gastroenterology, Chi Mei Medical Center in Tainan, Taiwan.
    To get solid data on the issue, the team conducted a cohort study among ARB initiators in 5 US claims databases covering numerous health insurers. They used Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for enteropathy‐related outcomes, including celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy. In all, they found nearly two million eligible patients. 
    They then assessed those patients and compared the results for olmesartan initiators to initiators of other ARBs after propensity score (PS) matching. They found unadjusted incidence rates of 0.82, 1.41, 1.66 and 29.20 per 1,000 person‐years for celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy respectively. 
    After PS matching comparing olmesartan to other ARBs, hazard ratios were 1.21 (95% CI, 1.05‐1.40), 1.00 (95% CI, 0.88‐1.13), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.10‐1.36) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01‐1.07) for each outcome. Patients aged 65 years and older showed greater hazard ratios for celiac disease, as did patients receiving treatment for more than 1 year, and patients receiving higher cumulative olmesartan doses.
    This is the first comprehensive multi‐database study to document a higher rate of enteropathy in olmesartan initiators as compared to initiators of other ARBs, though absolute rates were low for both groups.
    Source:
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics