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    Gluten-Free Dining Out


    Melanie Weir
    Gluten-Free Dining Out
    Image Caption: Photo: CC - Unique Hotels Group

    Celiac.com 04/16/2012 - Can I eat our at restaurants if I’m on a gluten-free diet?


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    Eating out gluten-free is not as easy as it seems.  If you Google "gluten-free restaurants," your bound to find a selection of gluten-free menus and gluten-free yelp reviews.  However, a global definition for gluten-free does not exist in the restaurant world.

    Photo: CC - Unique Hotels GroupMany times, restaurants, bakeries and deli’s offer gluten-free options like salads (with menu side notes like: order salad without croutons or order meat without bread).  If we define gluten-free as less than 20ppm, then the following factors must be followed to ensure safety from gluten contamination (please note this is only a partial list):

    Eating Salads Out

    1. Use of a Separate Strainer: Using a strainer that has been used for pastas or other gluten products, can result in cross contamination.
    2. Salad Dressing: Many salad dressing utilize gluten containing ingredients like malt vinegar, spices, natural flavorings, wheat, etc.
    3. Vegetable Chopping Board: A vegetable chopping board must either be completely sterilized or a gluten-free dedicated board must be used.
    4. Knife: Knife must be sterilized with heat before being used on gluten-free ingredients.
    5. Prep Area: Salad prep stations are often housed beneath shelves filled with bread.  If bread is stored above the salad prep area, then the area cannot be safely maintained as gluten-free.  On an additional note, croutons and other gluten products should not be allowed in the gluten-free prep area (1/6th of a bread crumb is all it takes to be contaminated with gluten).
    6. Salad Toppings: If a topping like chicken, nuts, tofu, peppers or onions are sautéd or prepared on a grill, then the grill and the ingredients must be maintained as gluten-free.
    Gluten-Free on the Grill
    1. A grill must be cleaned before a gluten-free product is cooked on it. A separate area for gluten free foods to be cooked is ideal, but not always possible in restaurant settings.
    2. Many meats are marinated in sauces containing gluten before they are cooked.
    Gluten Free Pizza & Bakery Products
    1. If an exhaust fan is used in the oven, a screen must be used.
    2. Pizza toppings for gluten free pizza should be housed in a separate area.
    3. Cannot be prepared in a facility that uses gluten containing flours, because flour dust in the air settles on food.
    4. Mixing utensils, wooden spoons, scrapes in bowls and cutting boards must be sterile or maintained for just gluten-free products.
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    It isn't necessary, according to the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America (GIG) to have the toppings for a gluten-free pizza stored in a separate area.

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    Guest Gloria Brown

    Posted

    Though once not so sensitive, I now get sick just sitting in a restaurant from breathing gluten which has become suspended in the air and forgetting to wash my hands afterwards from gluten oils on my fingers have picked-up, creating a second-hand contamination (so to speak).

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    Guest Draca

    Posted

    It isn't necessary, according to the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America (GIG) to have the toppings for a gluten-free pizza stored in a separate area.

    Use common sense: if the toppings are not stored seperately they may become contaminated. Who cares what the GIG says. People need to learn to think for themselves.

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    I understand the cleanliness and cross-contamination concerns, but I don't see why knives and cutting boards must be sterilized. Sterilization kills bacteria and viruses but does not get rid of gluten. If you heat a knife that has gluten on it, you will just end up with toasted gluten! Careful washing is sufficient to rid utensils of gluten. Sterilization is not necessary.

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    I'd like more info on heat sterlization. Sterilized gluten sounds like a cross-contamination misunderstanding. I wouldn't eat wheat pasta even if it' sterile. Why not thoroughly wash and rinse knives (assume design and materials don't dictate the knives cannot be adequately cleaned)?

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    Guest blueraiderfan10

    Posted

    It isn't necessary, according to the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America (GIG) to have the toppings for a gluten-free pizza stored in a separate area.

    Yes. this is according to GIG but to be "glutened" just because one wants a pizza is not worth it. (Believe me I know.)

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    Guest Ellen

    Posted

    What's this about sterilizing and heating the knife? This has nothing to do with gluten. I find it annoying when others, let alone others on a gluten-free diet, don't understand the difference between a pathogen and a protein. You cannot "kill" gluten with heat. This might seem like a small matter to pick at, but when we don't understand our own diet and promote ignorance like this, how can we expect other people to understand and take us seriously?

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    Guest Suzanne Thomson

    Posted

    That's a good checklist and it would be great if all restaurants followed these procedures, but in reality I am not convinced that they do. I seem to get glutened every 1 in 3 visit to a restaurant.

     

    I'm also confused about the sterilization of the knife part though! Washing it would make more sense.

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    Guest Joy Rogers

    Posted

    As much of an issue for me is the restaurants that say they have gluten-free items or a gluten-free menu, but seem to be using it as a ploy. I've been to a number of restaurants that claim to provide gluten-free items, but the reality is their choices boil down to either a stripped-down salad or a bland piece of meat and steamed veggies while still charging the full menu price. Grrrr... seriously?! It's not that hard to cook hearty, flavorful meals! I've figured it out, and I am sooo not a trained cook!

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    I know how cross contamination can happen. I am not sure how this helps me dining out as I am not in the kitchen cooking myself.

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    What's this about sterilizing and heating the knife? This has nothing to do with gluten. I find it annoying when others, let alone others on a gluten-free diet, don't understand the difference between a pathogen and a protein. You cannot "kill" gluten with heat. This might seem like a small matter to pick at, but when we don't understand our own diet and promote ignorance like this, how can we expect other people to understand and take us seriously?

    Gluten is a protein, all proteins can be denatured with heat: that is their logic.

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    Daniel Moran
    Celiac.com 05/20/2008 - I am going to be honest—I have not traveled outside the U.S.A. except for Mexico and Canada.  When I went to Mexico it was on a cruise ship, so that meant I could eat on the ship.  I would take snacks to tide me over or get a bag of chips.  Hopefully I will one day be able to tour the world and educate everyone on how to make true gluten-free meals for all of us.  I also hope that my when the time is right I will go on such trips with my loving wife.  So I will tell you how I would approach a trip to another country and you can decide if this is worth a try.
     Planning for the Trip (All per emails and internet and phone calls)

    I would contact the area chamber of commerce or tourist office in the country that I will be going to and see if they have heard of the gluten-free diet or celiac disease. If I was staying at a hotel or resort I would ask them to look into gluten-free meals and if they have a kitchen where I could talk with the executive chef or manager of food and beverages.  I would also tell them that I am a chef from the U.S.A. I would go to celiac.com to locate the nearest celiac support group to where I will be staying.  If there is one I would find out about local spots that I might be able to visit to get gluten-free meals, and if there are any bake shops or natural food stores where I could get some supplies and snacks. I would find a book on the languages that they speak and make a chef Daniel restaurant form so I could eat in a restaurant.  I would have it in all the languages including English for the chef to make sure they understand I am very serous about my health. I would have a card that said “May I speak to the manager and I have a special diet request.” Hopeful I could say that in their language. I would have a gluten-free restaurant card in their language and present it to the chef or manager. I would have a safe and forbidden list in the language where I was visiting.  That way I could check foods from the store so I could eat snacks. I would try to stay at a place with a microwave and possibly a refrigerator.  By doing this if I ran into a language problem I could cook chicken or meats in the microwave (I have cooked whole chickens in a microwave on vacation before and put it in the refrigerator for later). I would carry cards with me to ask for directions or to ask a wait staff for something I might be able to eat.  Like maybe some cheese, beverage, snacks or any type food of the area that I might like.  If you were at a port on the ocean your card could be sauté seafood and with olive oil.  Even if I didn’t look at the menu I would know that because I am at a town on the water, they would have fresh fish coming in. If any of you watch the Travel Channel  you know that there are a lot of different types of foods.  Being a chef I would want to experience all types of different foods.  If I knew something about the local cuisine and how it is prepared before I got there, it could give me an advantage. In Hong Kong I would love to eat some of the hot foods.  Could I eat them?  Is it just the chilies or is it the sauce?  Those are some of the questions I would wonder, so I would research the area and review cookbooks to see how they prepare their foods. If I knew where I would be traveling I would try to contact a local restaurant beforehand to see if I could view their menu for the time when I would be visiting.  If I did this, I could make my Chef Daniel restaurant form up ahead of the visit. I would make sure that when I was at my vacation spot I could get Internet access.  By doing this I could look up restaurants that I see when I am walking around to see if their menus were available online.  Also I would be able to translate a chef Daniel P restaurant form for that place if we decide to go there. I would make sure that I had a phone with internet access to look up info at any time. Also with the phone I could translate a sentence with a Web site I know about.
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    Jill Schaefer
    Celiac.com 09/11/2008 - After a two-leg flight and multiple trains, Jeff and I finally stepped off the local Circumvesuviana train in sunny Sorrento, our first destination on the fabled Amalfi Coast. It was hot, or as the Italians say, molto caldo. We’d been traveling for nearly 24 hours straight, and as we lugged our bags along the final stretch of cobbled sidewalks toward Casa Astarita, we both felt exhausted, ravenous and more than a bit disoriented.
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    Places that are familiar with gluten-free foods and offer gluten-free options:
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    (401) 849-0123
    www.Alittlecafe.usBouchard Restaurant and Inn
    505 Thames Street Newport, RI
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    Callahan's Café Zelda
    528 Thames Street Newport, RI
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    Castle Hill Inn
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    (401) 324-4522
    www.castlehillinn.com
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    (401) 846-4477
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    (401) 849-6312
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    Melissa Reed
    Restaurant: Gluten-Free Dining Experience
    Celiac.com 07/24/2014 - People that have celiac disease know one of the main concerns is avoiding gluten when they have meals. Their second biggest concern is the possible co-mingling of ingredients that can contaminate otherwise gluten-free food! So how do you eat at restaurants when you have celiac and still have peace of mind?
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    They are variously affiliated with the Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Centre for Rheumatology Research, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; the Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; the Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; the Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; the Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; and the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
    The team conducted a Swedish register-based retrospective cohort study that included 106, 464 patients with stress-related disorders, 1,064 ,640 matched unexposed individuals, and 126 ,652 full siblings to determine whether a clinical diagnosis of stress-related disorders was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease.
    The team identified stress-related disorder and autoimmune diseases using the National Patient Register. They used Cox model to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs of 41 autoimmune diseases beyond 1 year after the diagnosis of stress-related disorders, controlling for multiple risk factors.
    The data showed that being diagnosed with a stress-related disorder, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, acute stress reaction, adjustment disorder, and other stress reactions, was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease, compared with matched unexposed individuals. The team is calling for further studies to better understand the associations and the underlying factors.
    Source:
    JAMA. 2018;319(23):2388-2400. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.7028  

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-Free Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Breasts
    Celiac.com 08/11/2018 - Need a quick, easy, reliable gluten-free dish that will satisfy everyone and leave the cook with plenty of time to relax? This recipe is sure to do the trick. Best of all, it's super easy. Just grab some chicken breasts, season them, hit them with a sprig of rosemary, wrap some bacon around them, and chuck them on the grill and call it dinner. Okay, you can add some rice and veggies.
    Ingredients:
    4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves 4 thick slices bacon 4 teaspoons garlic powder 4 small sprigs fresh rosemary salt and pepper to taste Directions:
    Heat an outdoor grill to medium-high heat, and lightly oil the grate.
    Sprinkle 1 teaspoon garlic powder on a chicken breast and season with salt and pepper. 
    Place a rosemary sprig on each chicken breast. 
    Wrap the bacon around the chicken and the rosemary. 
    Hold bacon in place with a toothpick or extra rosemary stem.
    Cook the chicken breasts until no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, about 8 minutes per side. 
    Keep an eye out for any grill flare ups from the bacon grease. 
    Remove the toothpicks and serve with steamed rice and your favorite vegetables for a winning meal.

    Connie Sarros
    Five-Minute Healthy Breakfasts
    Celiac.com 08/10/2018 - You’ve heard for years that it’s wise to start your day with a healthy breakfast.  Eating food first thing in the morning gets your metabolism revved so you have energy throughout the day.  There’s also the issue of incorporating healthy foods into your first meal of the day.  Ideally, every meal should include fiber and foods from a variety of food groups.  But the reality is that most people don’t have time in the morning to create an involved meal.  You’re busy getting ready for work, packing the kids’ lunches and trying to get everyone out of the door on time.  
    Don’t fret.  The task of preparing a healthy breakfast just got easier.  You can make 5-minute breakfasts and, with a little bit of planning, you can sneak fiber into those meals without spending a lot of extra time with preparation.  An ideal breakfast will include whole grains (from gluten-free cereals, breads, muffins, or uncontaminated oats), a low-fat dairy item (1% milk, low-fat yogurt, or low-fat cheese), and a source of protein (such as peanut butter or eggs).  Adding fruit is a plus.  
    If you can tolerate uncontaminated oats, make a bowl of oatmeal and add a little extra fiber by stirring in chopped walnuts and dried cranberries.  If you like scrambled eggs, toss some fresh spinach (sliced into thin strips), 1 chopped canned artichoke heart, two tablespoons crumbled feta cheese, and a dash of Italian seasoning to the egg as it cooks.  
    If you have time on weekends to make healthy gluten-free pancakes (which  means that you added perhaps flax seed meal or shredded apples or something that qualifies as fiber to the batter), then freeze the pancakes between sheets of wax paper, place them in a freezer bag, and freeze so they’ll be handy on busy weekday mornings.  If you don’t have time to make them prior to need, you can always use commercial frozen gluten-free pancakes.  In a bowl, mix together a few raisins, half of a chopped pear or apple, a few dashes of cinnamon and a couple of tablespoons of chopped walnuts.  Spoon this mixture down the centers of two toasted (or microwaved) pancakes, drizzle each with 1 teaspoon of pancake or maple syrup, then fold in the sides of the pancakes to make two breakfast sandwiches.
    Brown rice is brown because the bran layer is still on the rice, and the bran layer is the part that’s so high in fiber.  White rice is much lower in fiber and has less nutritional value.  Brown rice isn’t just for dinner anymore.  It offers a nice breakfast alternative from traditional hot cereals.  The next time you make brown rice for dinner, make a little extra and save some for breakfast the next morning.  In the A.M., mix the rice (about 1 cup) with a few chopped pecans, a few raisins, 1/2 cup milk, 3 tablespoons pancake syrup, a dash each of vanilla and cinnamon, then microwave the mixture for 1 minute, stirring once after 30 seconds.  Let it sit for 30 seconds to thicken before eating.  Or stir together 1 cup cooked brown rice, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 navel orange diced, some chopped dates, dried cranberries, and shredded coconut; heat this in the microwave and then top it off with 1/2 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt.
    Just a note about using the microwave—it’s not an exact science.  Different ovens have different power levels so what cooks in 30 seconds in one person’s microwave may take 45 seconds in someone else’s unit.  Unless you want the food to splatter all over the sides of the oven, you’ll need to cover any liquids or soft foods with waxed paper.  
    There will be days when you don’t have time to sit down at the table and enjoy a leisurely breakfast.  On these days, make a “grab-and-go” breakfast that you can take with you.  Gluten-free wraps keep for several weeks in the refrigerator and they make great fill-and-go containers on busy mornings.  Spread a wrap with peanut butter, sprinkle some fortified gluten-free dry cereal on top, then drizzle with a teaspoon of pancake syrup; roll up the wrap and you have the perfect dashboard dining breakfast to eat on the way to work.  Or scramble an egg, spoon it down the center of the wrap, and then top it off with a little salsa and pepper-jack cheese before rolling it up. If you only have three minutes before you have to leave the house, spoon some low-fat cottage cheese into a cup, stir in a dash of cinnamon, top with a little low-fat gluten-free granola or fortified dry gluten-free cereal, sprinkle berries or chopped peaches over the top, grab a spoon, and you’re ready to go!
    Smoothies can be made in literally one minute.  Toss some frozen raspberries into a blender, add a 12-ounce container of low-fat lemon yogurt, a little milk, and two teaspoons of vanilla; blend, then pour the mixture into a large plastic cup.
    If you oversleep, don’t panic.  Have some back-up foods on hand that you can grab and eat en route to work, like a gluten-free protein bar and a banana, or a bag of nuts and dried fruit, or flax seed crackers with a handful of cheese cubes, or toss some gluten-free granola over a container of yogurt and grab a spoon to take along.
    All of the above suggestions can be made in five minutes or less.  Take the time to start your day off with a healthy breakfast—you deserve to do that for yourself and for your family.
    Apple English Muffins by Connie Sarros
    This recipe is from my newly-released book Student’s Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies.  While this isn’t a gluten-free cookbook, most of the recipes are naturally gluten-free or can very easily be converted to gluten-free.  
    Preparation time:  4 minutes.  Cooking time:  30 seconds.  Yield:  1 serving
    Ingredients:
    1 tablespoon peanut butter  1 gluten-free English muffin, toasted  1/8 large apple, peeled, cored and sliced thin ½ teaspoon butter  ¾ teaspoon brown sugar 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon Directions:
    Spread peanut butter on one toasted English muffin half.  Lay the apple slices on top. In a small microwave safe bowl, heat the butter in the microwave on high for 15 seconds.  Stir in the brown sugar and cinnamon then nuke for another 15 seconds.  Stir until smooth.  (If necessary, pop it back into the microwave until the brown sugar melts).   Drizzle the cinnamon mixture over the apple slices then place the second half of the English muffin on top. Note:  If you’re out of apples, use a pear, ripe peach or nectarine, mango, or even a banana.

    Jefferson Adams
    Can a New Gluten-Free Cricket-Flour Cookbook Turn Americans on to Eating Bugs?
    Celiac.com 08/09/2018 - Whatever one might say about crawfish, shrimp and crustaceans in general, Americans don’t typically eat bugs. Can a former Ralph Lauren marketing executive turn the world on to flour made from crickets?
    Over the last few years, Americans have been presented with a buffet of alternative proteins and meals. Robyn Shapiro’s company, Seek, has created all-purpose, gluten-free, and Paleo blended flours, which can be used cup for cup in any recipe calling for flour. 
    The company, which makes pure cricket powder for smoothies, ice creams, and other liquid-based foods, is now selling cinnamon-almond crunch cricket protein and snack bites. To get the public interested in its cricket protein and cricket flour products, Shapiro has collaborated with famous chefs to create recipes for The Cricket Cookbook. 
    The book’s cast includes La Newyorkina chef Fany Gerson, a Mexico City native known for her cricket sundaes; noted Sioux chef and cookbook author Sean Sherman; and former Noma pastry chef Ghetto Gastro member, Malcolm Livingston, among others.
    Other companies have sought to promote the benefits of insect protein, including Chapul, which makes cricket protein bars and powders, and Exo, which makes dairy- and gluten-free cricket protein bars in flavors like cocoa nut and banana bread. These companies, along with others in the business tend to aim their products at Paleo dieters by promising more protein and no dairy.
    Seek’s chef-focused approach makes it unique. By pairing with noted chefs who already use bugs and bug protein in their cooking, Shapiro is looking to make the public more comfortable and confident in using bugs to cook and bake. So far, the response has been slow, but steady. Seek has already raised nearly $13,000 from 28 backers, well on its way toward its $25,000 goal. 
    Seek’s cricket flours and other products will initially only be available via Kickstarter. If that goes well, the products will be sold on Seek’s website. Early backers will get a discount and a chance for a signed copy of the book. Seek hopes to debut their products nationwide starting in the fall. 
    Could gluten-free cricket flour and the new cookbook be the next big gluten-free Christmas gift? Stay tuned for more on this and other gluten-free stories.
    Source:
    grubstreet.com