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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    OREGON GLUTEN-FREE TRAVEL: WHERE GLUTEN IS THE NEW AL QAEDA


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    Celiac.com 08/31/2015 - It is possible that Oregon could be one of the gluten-free friendliest places on Earth. I had never been there before, but after a road trip to Oregon this summer I will definitely be back.


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    Photo: Scott AdamsOne interesting thing that I already knew about Oregon before my trip was that, for some reason, it is a hotbed for the test marketing of new gluten-free products. Many large corporations roll them out there first, before launching them in other states. These companies also pump a lot of marketing money into Oregon to promote these products—on a level that I've not seen in other states. Here is a picture that I took in downtown Portland of a huge billboard for Coors Peak Copper Lager. Not only can I not find this new gluten-free beer anywhere in the California Bay Area, but I also have never seen advertising done here on this scale for any gluten-free product.

    Perhaps due to Oregon's history of being very progressive when it comes to food and beverage trends—for example the microbrewery and organic food movements took hold there very early on—it seems that the gluten-free food movement has also progressed there faster and is far more mature than many other places that I've been. This was very apparent to me when I first crossed the border and stopped at a Subway and found that they offered a gluten-free sub roll option, and the staff was well-trained in how to prepare my sandwich in a way that would minimize any cross-contamination risks.

    Besides large corporate chain restaurants which offered unexpected gluten-free options, every local or family owned restaurant that I ate in also offered gluten-free options and/or a gluten-free menu. In fact, there is even a huge food truck culture in downtown Portland that is centered in parking lots near the China Town area, and many of these trucks advertise that they are either entirely gluten-free or have gluten-free options.

    Photo: Scott AdamsSo you may be wondering where I came up with “ Gluten is the New Al Qaeda” in the title of this article? While in Portland I visited their huge “Portland Saturday Market,” which covers most of the waterfront in the downtown area on Saturdays and Sundays from March through Christmas. In one of the booths I found a vendor who was selling t-shirts and tote bags with this phrase on it, and since I happened to need a tote bag I picked one up. Looking back on this trip now I believe that this vendor's idea pretty much summed up my gluten-free experiences in Oregon—where those who are gluten-free will find many like minded people and therefore wont' have to waist much time explaining themselves when they order food—and a place where gluten is now being avoided by many Oregonians like most people in the world hope to avoid Al Qaeda!


    Image Caption: Photo: Scott Adams
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    Guest Scott Adams

    Posted

    Offensive title, regardless of the pun or the t-shirt.

    They don't seem to mind it so much in Oregon.

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    Great article but I agree with Lizzy. I have a great sense of sarcasm and humor but not with this. Would love to have a catchy gluten free shirt but this isn't it.

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    I agree with Lizzy and Lindar, and I am a native Oregonian. This can be read two ways: gluten is bad; making fun of or insensitively insulting those who must be avoid gluten.

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    Guest Susan Norman

    Posted

    Seattle area has also become a great place to live if you're gluten intolerant, especially in the last five years or so. For one thing, the area has come to demand more transparency in the make-up and origins of our food. Maybe our proximity to Canada with their heightened awareness and acknowledgement of celiac and gluten intolerance has an affect. Another influence may be that the booming local tech industry has drawn more people to the area who demand and can afford gluten-free alternatives.

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    Guest Coleman

    Posted

    I live in Portland, Oregon and found the title of this article in poor taste. Just because one little vendor at Saturday Market doesn't mean that Oregon is down with it. Oh, and Saturday Market is more for tourists and out of towners.

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    I agree with Lizzy and Lindar, and I am a native Oregonian. This can be read two ways: gluten is bad; making fun of or insensitively insulting those who must be avoid gluten.

    I suppose you could look at it in the more negative way if you like?

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    I live in Portland, Oregon and found the title of this article in poor taste. Just because one little vendor at Saturday Market doesn't mean that Oregon is down with it. Oh, and Saturday Market is more for tourists and out of towners.

    Sorry I was a tourist and "out of towner" Coleman...the glass is either half full or half emtpy...eh?

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    In spirit the comparison made in this article is no different from common sayings in the English language like: "I avoid it like the plague." Obviously the plague killed tens of millions of people, perhaps 25% of mankind, and is still a very serious disease that people get each year, however, we still don't think twice about saying such things, and I doubt anyone here would take objection to using this phrase. I too avoid gluten like Al Qaeda!

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    I thought the t-shirt was funny! We must have a sense of humor about our situations, and let's face it, gluten could eventually kill someone with celiac disease, so the comparison isn't that far off. Anyhow, here in Colorado (where they probably make it) we don't even have that gluten-free Coors, so I am very jealous! Hopefully we get it soon. This article makes me want to visit Oregon!

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    Phyllis Morrow
    Celiac.com 04/29/2008 - We were unloading our rafting gear at Lee’s Ferry, about to plunge into a 19 day private (self-guided) trip on the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. Very hungry after a long travel day, people were happily handing around the pizzas that they had picked up en route. I was walking back towards the pick-up truck, looking forward to the gluten-free supper of stuffed grape leaves, rice and salad that I’d stashed on the front seat. My anxieties had been crowding around me all day long, shoving each other like a bunch of rowdy teenagers. I was nervous about big water, scorpions, rattlesnakes, rock scrambling, new traveling companions and, of course, food. To my dismay, the truck was gone, off on a distant errand in town. Suddenly, one, lone sniveling child of an emotion stepped out in front of the others. “You’re going to starve,” she whimpered. Turning my back so my fellow travelers couldn’t see my distress, I felt tears run down my face. Rationally, I knew that the pick-up would be back in a few hours. I knew, too, that the boxes and boxes of food that I had helped to select would arrive later that evening. But at that hungry moment, desolation and self-pity threatened to overwhelm me. 
    It can feel scary to venture away from the familiar settings in which you have a high degree of food control. But outdoor activities – and outdoor eating – are too much fun to pass up. With a positive attitude, smart planning, and a measure of trust, you can get out and enjoy camping, hiking, biking, boating and picnicking. That day on the banks of the Colorado, I gently prodded my hunger back into the crowd of emotions, scrounged around for some nuts, and, yes, survived until my dinner returned.  Over the next 220 miles of rocks and rapids, I turned my mind to other thrills and chills. And I had plenty to eat.
    While not always in such remote surroundings, I regularly enjoy a wide variety of outdoor activities and have, over the years, developed some strategies for going gluten-free from the mountains to the sea. Here are some suggestions that will variously serve from the local state park to the Grand Canyon and the Alaskan backcountry.
    First, preparing and eating gluten-free foods outdoors comes with a particular set of challenges. Here are some things to consider.

    Control over food selection – from choosing the menus to purchasing food and beverages – can be especially problematic if your trip takes you far from the road and the grocery store. Unless you plan to trap rabbits and eat wild greens, you’ll need to make sure that you have enough gluten-free food for the duration. Keeping cooking surfaces, eating surfaces, and utensils free of gluten contamination takes care when you have little or no hot running water. Fellow travelers need to be educated about your needs. That’s important whether they are sharing cooking duty or just helping you keep some ravenous 12-year old from eating up all of the gluten-free cookies (that inexplicably look more delicious than the Oreos packed for the rest of the group). Depending on the type of trip, more general food restrictions, such as concerns about perishability or weight, may compound your gluten restriction by narrowing the choice of what you can bring. Packing gluten-free baked items (bread, crackers, cookies) takes special care because of their comparative fragility. The ability to access your gluten-free food items requires logistical packing decisions; you need to be able to find your dinner for day one on day one, not buried at the bottom of the supplies with items that nobody plans to excavate until day six. Accidents and moments of disappointment are bound to occur. Imagine the “oh no” second when someone bumps your elbow just as you are about to tuck into the one and only gluten-free bowl of chili. You watch your lunch cascade, as if in slow motion, into the dirt. At some point, you can expect someone to absent-mindedly put a gluten-contaminated knife in the jam. You can figure on a meal where you belatedly discover gluten on an ingredient label although the cook assured you that you could eat “everything” he prepared.
    Don’t be daunted. I’ll give some suggestions for dealing with all of these challenges. But let’s start with overall approaches to food planning:
    Using a separatist approach, you can plan your own menu and essentially eat apart from others. Depending on the duration and complexity of the planned trip, this can be a simple alternative that guarantees you full control over what you eat. For example, I just did a cross-country ski day trip with friends and we each packed our own sandwiches. I brought some gluten-free chocolate cake and a thermos of tea to share, and my friends shared their carrot sticks and nuts. Bingo, everyone was happy and felt sociable. Separatism is generally not a good approach on a multi-day trip, though, where people plan to cook together. For one thing, separate planning and preparation mean duplication of effort. Worse, you’ll be left out of the social interaction of cooking in camp and you may feel like a leper when everyone else sits down to some delicious meal and you are trying to make the best out of a reconstituted cup of gluten-free dried soup mix. A second option is to make the outing gluten-free for everyone. This works well if you have the time and the skills to take the lead in arranging food. If you have good taste and are a competent trip/food planner, nobody will be the wiser and, in fact, they’ll generally appreciate having you do the work. Since other people don’t think about gluten one way or the other, they certainly won’t care that they are using mustard or ketchup or soy sauce that happens to be gluten-free. They’ll be perfectly happy with meals based on rice, potatoes, corn tortillas, gluten-free pancake mix, brownies and other gluten-free foods. Tasty and filling meals make most people happy, and unless they are unreasonable (in which case you shouldn’t invite them along next time) they won’t get bent out of shape if they can’t have their favorite brand of sausage in the morning. Bread is the obvious exception, since few gluten-free breads meet the criterion of “I can’t tell the difference.” So have someone else bring the bread, if that’s an issue. A third, often very practical, option falls somewhere between these two extremes. In this case, you participate in the menu planning and make sure that as many staples and other items as possible are gluten-free (e.g., peanut butter, condiments, canned goods). Where planned meals call for some gluten-containing items, you provide gluten-free equivalents for yourself. You label each item visibly (e.g., a masking tape label with black permanent marker reading “Gluten-free Bagel for Susie”) and pack it so that it will be accessible for the appropriate meal. So you make sure that the spaghetti sauce purchased for the entire group is gluten-free but you include a package of gluten-free pasta for your own meal. You bring your own bread, cookies, cereal and crackers for all meals and snacks. You also participate in cooking so that you can avoid cross-contamination and, where necessary, set portions aside before gluten-containing ingredients are added. For example, if everyone else wants their fresh trout dredged in flour, you just reserve your portion, dredge it in cornmeal, and fry it in a separate pan. You also request to serve yourself first before others accidentally contaminate a dish.
    The Grand Canyon trip that I mentioned at the start was one of two that I have taken where I had to trust strangers to provision the group. Although we guided our own trip, we hired professional outfitters to supply the rafts and food. In that situation, I consulted extensively on the menu choices and requested that processed foods be kept at a minimum; instead I asked that they supply mostly basic ingredients (fruits, vegetables, eggs, butter, cheese). I also asked if items would be in their original packages so that I could check labels for gluten. I brought a variety of gluten-free starches to supplement and substitute for items on the planned menu. I picked up gluten-free snacks at a Trader Joe’s – more than I needed, in the end. The kids with us were thrilled when, after having consistently shooed them away from my goodies, I was able to generously share them towards the end of our time together.The second trip provisioned by strangers turned out to be an unexpectedly relaxed and gourmet experience for me. In this case, it was not possible for me to participate directly in the food planning. But I was touched and surprised by the kindness and care of my traveling companions. I found out that the two men who had volunteered to take food responsibility were doctors (as well as fine cooks). A phone conversation and e-mail exchange during the planning period reassured me that they understood about celiac disease. They went out of their way to make meals that were safe and delicious. There was another unexpected benefit to that trip. A physician’s assistant who was also with us contacted me a few weeks after we all returned home. She told me that having just traveled with me made her pick up on some likely symptoms in a young patient. A celiac diagnosis was confirmed, and she had called to ask for some advice on contacts and reliable sources of information, which she passed on to the patient.
    Implicitly, I’ve brought up the need to educate your fellow travelers here. In general, it’s a good idea both to describe your gluten-free needs in advance and to participate in cooking and clean-up during the trip. Unless and until you can trust that other cooks and food-handlers “get it,” you’ll want to be in or near the food action most of the time. There, you can demonstrate what’s required, take care of cooking portions separately when necessary and serve your own food. While maintaining a scrupulously uncontaminated washing environment is tough while camping, I strongly suggest that you at least reserve one cooking pot for water only. That pot will never get pasta residue or other gluten scraps stuck to the bottom and you will always have a source of clean hot water for cooking (i.e., for hot beverages or adding to instant foods) and washing up. The others may appreciate this rule, too, since it will prevent their morning hot chocolate from having oatmeal or bits of last night’s curried lentils floating in it!  If you are lucky enough to have a pre-educated friend along, or if your traveling companions are quick and considerate learners, at times you’ll be able to relax your vigilance. Whenever my husband is cooking or washing-up, for example, I can go help out with other chores – or sit down with a glass of wine and a book.
    Because your companions are likely to be gluten-oblivious, though, you can expect an occasional mishap. For those moments of disappointment, when your dinner has just been ruined or has driven off in the cab of the pick-up truck, you should keep an easy meal in reserve. Make it something that you like (how about that Annie’s gluten-free Mac and Cheese?) so that you don’t feel too deprived. Or set aside a favorite dessert so that if you have to make do with a minimal supper you can at least have a special sweet.
    Whether you are supplying your own food or relying primarily on others, a few tricks will help you keep your edibles edible.  There are things that I always carry with me: at least one thin, flexible plastic cutting board; one or two plastic containers; and a set of utensils. The light plastic cutting board allows you to create an instant clean surface for food preparation or consumption anywhere you go. In fact, I keep one or two in my suitcase for ordinary travel and they are also essential in my home kitchen.  If the mats you purchase are too large for convenience, cut them down to a size (6” x 8” or 8” x 11”) that fits easily into your backpack, bike pannier, or food box. They are so flat that they take up virtually no space and you’ll have solved the problem of gluten-y picnic tables (or airline trays or food court counters, for that matter). The mats are very easy to wash, rinse and dry and can be kept clean in a plastic bag for the next use; you might want to size yours to fit into a half-gallon Ziploc bag. Having your own set of utensils is useful for obvious reasons, but for camping and picnics a good pocketknife is essential. When someone else takes out his or her knife to cut food for everyone, volunteer yours for the purpose, since you can be sure it’s gluten-free. Plastic containers will help you keep your gluten-free baked goods intact, particularly if you try to pack them just tightly enough that the goods will not rattle around inside. I find a couple of sandwich-sized plastic containers very useful, as well as a few others of assorted sizes. Small containers that fit into a waist pack or day pack will protect your lunch much better than a plastic bag. Mark your containers “Gluten-free foods only” so that they do not become mixed up with containers for general food storage.
    There is one caution about keeping your foods separate that I can illustrate with a little story. On one overnight biking/camping trip, I forgot to remove my gluten-free snack bars from my bicycle pannier. When I saddled up the next morning, I discovered that small campground thieves (probably squirrels) had chewed right through the fabric to get at them. My bag was ruined, but at least we weren’t camping in bear country that night…a reminder that wild animals are just as happy to eat gluten-free as anything else.
    Camping foods usually need to be relatively compact even if you have the luxury of carrying a lot (in a car, RV, motorboat or raft). Weight is, of course, an additional issue if you are backpacking, bicycling, or kayaking. Depending on which activity you’re doing, you can pick and choose among some of these easy options:

    Trail mix: It’s a snap to make your own with gluten-free dried fruits, nuts, coconut, chocolate chips, and/or gluten-free cereal. Just use care in your selections. For example, while whole dates are usually gluten-free, chopped dates are often dusted in barley flour so that they will not stick together. Snack bars/energy bars: Take some of your favorites (check the nutrition/health food section of your grocery store as there are an increasing number of possibilities out there) or, if you are so inclined, you can even make your own granola bars based on gluten-free granola, such as Bakery on Main or Trader Joe’s brands, or by using gluten-free rolled oats. Boil-in-bag foods and pre-cooked foods: If weight is not an issue, these are convenient and non-perishable. Heat up a pan of water, slip in the pouch, cut it open and eat: if you are worried about keeping pans clean, this completely solves any cross-contamination problem. Tasty Bite makes a variety of gluten-free Indian and Thai foods packaged in “smart pouches.”  They are commonly available in regular grocery stores. To save packing room, toss out the boxes at home and bring only the pouches, but be sure to label them with a permanent marker if the pouches do not have the contents printed on them, since they will all look alike. Pre-cooked polenta rolls are similarly convenient. Instant cereal: For gluten-loving campers, instant oatmeal in individual serving packs is a standard breakfast item. I don’t know of anyone marketing gluten-free oats this way, but an equivalent for gluten-free campers is quinoa instant hot cereal, similarly packaged (Altiplano Gold makes several flavors that can be ordered on-line). You can also pre-measure quick-cooking cereal, such as rice cereal, in Ziploc bags with a little salt and flavorings (cinnamon, sugar, etc.) of your choice. Pre-measure in the drinking cup that you plan to bring camping with you. Then you can use the same cup to measure water proportionately. I use the same method for measuring and packing other dried foods such as rice, quinoa, or polenta, often including herbs and spices: mark the contents, amount of water needed, and cooking time on the plastic bag. Cured or dried meats: Freybe makes salami-type sausages that are compact and keep well. Shelton makes gluten-free turkey jerky. Though quite expensive, it is very lightweight. S’mores: A facsimile of everybody’s camping favorite is easy to make. Marshmallows are typically gluten-free (find a brand that is labeled as such), as are plain Hershey’s chocolate bars. Substituting gluten-free cookies for graham crackers makes gluten-free s’mores even more decadent than the originals. Dried foods:  A variety of dried foods, such as bean flakes, potato flakes, and vegetables are available in gluten-free versions and make packing light and camp cooking quick. As always, you need to read labels. Rice (including brown rice) that has been partially pre-cooked and dried does not take long to prepare. If you are using a small camp stove, quick-cooking items save on fuel weight, too. Dutch oven baked goods: If your trip is such that you can carry an aluminum (lighter than cast iron) Dutch oven and some charcoal, you can turn out cornbread, brownies, and cakes that will make you the hit of the crowd. Bring your favorite gluten-free mixes, or mix up your own dry ingredients from your favorite recipes. Don’t forget to bring the necessary wet ingredients, too, of course. Search for Dutch oven camping recipes on-line to learn the basic technique. It’s not hard.
    Okay, now you have no excuses not to get out there. Have a great gluten-free summer and remember that getting active and outdoors is as important as eating well.

    Daniel Moran
    Celiac.com 05/08/2008 - I am here to help you with your needs as you travel, and to be able to keep the "Gluten Monster" away, so you can enjoy your trip.
    When getting ready to fly you have to expect long delays.  As a celiac that means you have to try to find food.  If you haven’t traveled by plane before you will be in for a big surprise.  The restaurants that are in the airports are always busy.  This means that it is like going to a restaurant at peak time, and, in my opinion, that is not the best time for celiacs to eat in restaurants.  You might want to try the fast food places that are chains if they are in the airport.  The usual method is to try to get the manager to help you.  Give the manager a fresh plastic fork to retrieve your meat or chicken so they don’t use gloves that have bread crumbs on them.  Ask for catsup or mayo packages so you can read the ingredients.  You can ask for them to make a fresh salad if that is what you like.  One of the good things about most of the restaurants in airports is that at many of them you will be able to see the cooks prepare your food. Never be afraid to say “I saw you put my food on the table and bread got on it” and ask for a new meal.
    If there are no chain restaurants at the airport go to one of the restaurants where you can watch your food get made.  Some of the restaurants have the cooking grill right in front of you.  See if they can cook the food (hamburger, chicken) on the grill.  You have to determine if they put the buns on the grill. If they do grill the buns on the same grill where they cook your food there is a good chance that crumbs are there and you should stay away or ask them to clean the grill with the razor blade tool.  You have to determine how busy they are and if they are too busy don’t ask for something like that.  Sometimes I ask for my food to be covered and microwaved.  This is a very safe way to have your food cooked and if it is busy in the kitchen, your food is well protected.
    You still need to be careful with the salads in these types of restaurants.  Remember that these places are usually busy and crumbs fly around everywhere.  If they are slow ask if they can open a fresh bag of processed salad for you because you get very ill from the smallest crumb.
    What Chef Daniel does when Flying
    When I fly I always have a plan B.  I bring a carry on bag with some gluten-free food that is in a clear plastic bag.  This is food that if security says throw it away, I do.  So far all the times I have traveled by air I haven’t been asked to throw anything away. I bring food that can last all day without spoiling.  I bring food that if it gets hot and melts it is still good to eat.  I like ham, pepperoni, cheese, vegetables, peanuts and some candy to keep me going. Just remember to tell the security that you have a special diet in case they ask, but don’t offer the info unless they ask.  You need to be truthful and most folks are going to understand.  Let the security know that you are unable to eat in the local airport restaurants and you have a long day ahead of you. You don’t want to cause any trouble in an airport so be willing to throw it away the second they ask.  You could pull out your chef Daniel restaurant paper to show them how serous you take eating and by providing your list it will show them that you are very serious.  It is just a way to show security how serious you take your health.
    Now you should be ok if you got through security and when the flight attendant comes around offering food, especially if you are on a flight for a long time, you have some food that will carry you over.  Most airlines will take special requests for meals but you are taking a huge chance on eating that food.  The caterers who do these meals for the planes do thousands and thousands of meals.  I don’t take the chance of eating such a meal.  I get way to sick if there is any contamination. When I call in for a special request for a meal I ask for whole fruit or whole vegetables, anything I know that hasn’t been on a cutting board.  
    I usually ask for carrots or other vegetables or fruit that I like.  I am scared of being sick so I will cut or break my food then eat it.  Even at restaurants I ask for whole vegetables for me to cut myself.  If you read my last article about my salad with croutons coming to me you can see why I am so scared of restaurants. Once you are burned you never forget...but you do learn.
    If you call ahead to the airport to ask for a special diet request make sure you are thorough with your request and tell them how sick you can get.  Ask the airlines if you can send a request per email or snail mail with your directions in how to prepare your meal.  I would ask the caterer to tape your request right to your plate so when you board the plane it will be easy to see.  As you board notify the stewards you are the special meal request.  Be sure to have a plan B. Look at your meal carefully when you get it and determine if it is up to your standards.
    I believe this article can help you travel gluten-free on board any airline.  There are always little stops where you can buy a piece of fruit or packaged products but if you want something more like a hot meal you will need to follow my advice to stay safe.
    Gluten-Free Air Travel Hints:

    You should always try to getthe manager to help you.  In any restaurant they have the most time tohelp you and they will help you because they typically care more thanthe regular workers (today’s restaurants have employees that come inone day and are gone the next.help.  It is sad but that is the way itis so at least try to get the manager. Don’t be ashamed to askfor anything. If you want a hot dog or the chips they put on the sideof the plate ask for a bag with the product inside.  Take out your safeand forbidden lists if needed and look at them to see if you can eat aproduct. 
    Always have your Chef Daniel's restaurant paper with you in your walletor purse.
    Always have a copy of your safe and forbidden lists with youin case you need it to read ingredients. Always have a gluten-free restaurant card in the language you need.
    Crosscontamination is the greatest risk for a celiac when traveling.  Crosscontamination can happen and you would never know it, such as when thechef uses a knife to cut a piece of bread, and then they use the sameknife on your vegetables, or when the chef uses a pair of tongs to flipa breaded chicken and then uses them to flip your sauté chicken.Thereare too many other ways to mention, but the main thing is that glutencould be on the tool before it is used on your meal, and it doesn’tmatter how safe the chef thought he was because you got one crumb andyou are sick for days and that ruins your vacation. Chef Daniel

    Daniel Moran
    Celiac.com 05/25/2008 - When traveling should you go to a restaurant with a gluten-free menu or not—that is the question. It is important to let you know that because of your comments I can come up with discussions like this, so please keep them coming.  Let’s talk about gluten-free menus (this is, of course, only my opinion).
    Gluten-Free Menu Pros:

    Gives the person a chance to order from a menu that was made for them. The restaurant should know about all the ingredients that will make you sick.   
    Gluten-Free Menu Cons (Sorry but experiences when going to restaurants with gluten-frees menus have only been bad ones, although I am sure that there are good restaurants out there.  I live in a very small town that is surrounded by small towns.  I am the only celiac for 100 miles that I know of.  I’m sure that in a big city it would be different. I have eaten in the big city too, and also had a terrible experience with their gluten-free menu):
    The staff often has no idea what gluten-free really means. The staff thinks that it is only wheat and not all the other items that are on our forbidden list. Sometimes they don’t even know that their restaurant does offer a gluten-free menu. The staff has not been properly trained.  That goes for the wait staff and the cooks or chefs who are making your meal.  Cross-contamination occurs and there is nothing that you can do about it. The restaurant is trying to do something nice for us but may be focused more on the extra money that can make with such a menu. The gluten-free menu is so small and only offers a few items, while regular customers have 50 items to choose from. We travel so far to go to one of these restaurants, when we could be getting the same or better service from a nice, local restaurant.
    You can see were I am going with this, so I will stop.  Let’s look at traveling options and my experiences.  I have traveled with my boys around the USA.  Normally we live in a tent and stay at state parks where it is cheap.  We have hit Gettysburg, Niagara Falls, Hershey Pennsylvania, Boston, Florida, Georgia, Colorado, South Dakota, Chicago, New York, and many more places.  I also have gone with my wife to Las Vegas, Washington and some more places.  I have traveled in the USA and do not plan my meals around gluten-free menus at restaurants—and I want to explain why.  I was in New York twice.  I went with my two boys and the other time it was just me and my wife.
    The first time in New York with my boys we stopped at Nathan’s in Coney Island.  We watched them eat hot dogs on July 4th on the TV—you know every year somebody eats 50 or so of them.  So we traveled to Coney Island just to go to Nathan’s.  We went to Nathan’s and I waited until there was no line at the window (Rule 1—always wait until it is slow).  I approached the window with my boys (Rule 2, observe how they cook the item you are going to ask for—are they sloppy when they are serving the food? If so ask them to change gloves or give them a fork to get your food).  Noone was behind us so I knew it would be no trouble to ask for special help.  I told the server I have a special diet request and could they help me.  I asked if they had the package handy so I could look at the wrapper the dogs came in.  They go through a lot of dogs so it was right there.  After I reviewed the package I asked them if they could use a plastic fork to get me a couple of dogs. They did and they were great.  Ask for condiments to go, those had the ingredients on them.
    Another time I was with my wife and she wanted to go to T.G.I.F.—at that time they had no gluten-free menu (they might now, I don’t know).  We went in at a slow time and I gave them my Chef Daniel P. restaurant form and I also ate very well with no illness the next day. I used the two rules mentioned above that I always go by.
    This year my wife and I went to Las Vegas.  My wife wanted to go to the Las Vegas Stratosphere Tower to eat while overlooking Las Vegas.  They also didn’t have a gluten-free menu, and she made our reservations.  She used Rule 1 and made it for the last reservation they would accept.  I asked for the manager and told him I have a special diet request and tonight I would love to have the duck breast if they were not marinated.  He said he would check with the chef.  A few minutes later the executive chef came out to our table to speak with us (this chef is well paid, and this is what I have been saying from day one to you about chefs in fine dining establishments—they care just like I do).  The fact that he had time to come to our table happened for a few reasons I believe:

    They were slow enough that the chef could take time away from the kitchen to help his customer. This is the type of place that cares what you think, what you say about their establishment to others—and they don’t want to make anyone sick. I was direct and to the point in what I wanted to eat and the chef could do it. When the chef came out I told him exactly what I told the manager about my illness and the nature of it.   I asked him if he could sauté me some duck breast. Duck breast was on the menu but it was with a terraki sauce and the soy sauce normally has wheat in it.  I wasn’t in the mood for terraki anyway, so this how I ordered my meal—and yes I did write it down on my chef Daniel P restaurant form: Sauté the duck breast in olive oil until ¾ of the way done.  Pull it out and put it to the side and deglaze the pan with white wine.  Add orange juice, a hint of pineapple juice and tighten it with corn starch or arrow root.  Add the duck breast, orange zest and a splash of lime juice. Microwave some white rice. Microwave any fresh vegetables. No seasonings or garnish.

    I just had them make Duck ala Orange for me—and you can do something like this too if you just believe in yourself and do it. Our meal took extra time but we were on top of the world so who cares?  It is worth the wait to not get sick, and we ended up having a fantastic meal.I have a few thoughts to share with you for when you start to look for gluten-free menus.  Gluten-free menus are good but they are not great.  If I was in Japan and I had to go out to a restaurant, I would want to go to a sushi restaurant.  I would not search around for a place with a gluten-free menu.  I am always going to use Rules 1 and 2 anyway.  In Japan I would look for the restaurant that cuts and serves the sushi right in front of me.  If I was in France, I would use the two Rules first, and also try to find a place that does table-side cooking.  If I was in Louisiana, I would do rule 1 and rule 2 then go to a restaurant that I know has a good reputation and give them my Chef Daniel form and enjoy my meal like everyone else.
    You need to eat where you want to eat and not limit yourself.  How many of you would want to eat at Wolfgang Pucks restaurant?  Are you going to say that eating where there is a gluten-free menu will be better than eating at Wolfgang’s place?  What if you were visiting the Eiffel Tower in Paris or a bistro across the street from it?  It would be nice to have a gluten-free menu in those places, but it is unlikely. We have to come together as one group and order the same way.  In time I will convert menus at the cruise ships or the chains of motels that have chain restaurants.  Traveling is what we do and it doesn’t matter if you have to restrict your diet or not. We all love food and we will pay extra if we have to, but we must expect not to get sick. 
    My ultimate goal is to be able to walk into any restaurant and have a great gluten-free menu. I would love to see a real gluten-free menu with lots of great entrées to pick from.  Ultimately it is up to us to educate workers in the places that we eat in about the gluten-free diet.   We need to come together and start standing up and saying that we are special too.
    Chef Daniel.
     

    Daniel Moran
    Celiac.com 06/03/2008 - As you travel and experience the sites of the world you are going to have to stop at a restaurant or destination that has a small kitchen.  Let me tell you a little bit about myself so you can understand that I also started in a small kitchen.
    Chef Daniel P's Autobiography
    I started working at the age of 13 and began my work in a very small tourist town and was promoted up from busboy to dishwasher.  I was so fast at washing the dishes that I was promoted up within a month to cook.  I went from the buffet type restaurant to an ala cart restaurant and buffet line.  At the age of 17 I was completely in charge of the kitchen—this included all ordering, menu making, staff hiring and firing, and every task a person would do to run a successful kitchen.  I didn’t know how to cook though—at least not compared to what I learned later. Yes I could do the basic menus but I wanted more and I left to climb the ladder of a big kitchen—so I set my sites on gourmet food.  At that time I saw that Prince Charles from England was visiting Palm Beach Florida.  I saw that he visited two places while he was in Palm Beach—the Palm Beach Polo Ground and he also visited the Breakers Resort.  I applied at both places when I came to Florida and both wanted to hire me.
    Every one has to start somewhere and you as the traveler are the ones who are going to train the future cooks or chefs.  Yes you—the cook is going to learn from you as celiac patrons, so you need to do the right training.  Let’s use the example of eating on a train that cooks for their patrons as they travel across the country.  I like to think of a small boat or train as two of the most difficult places to prepare a gluten-free meal.  They both are going to be small, and both have the potential to get bumpy while the cook is preparing food.  This means there is a good chance an accident can happen and of course cross-contamination.
    These kitchens probably keep their fires contained in the stove or flat top burners.  By keeping the flame for cooking contained in a box, this means they have less chance of a fire starting and that is very important if you are on a river or going down the train tracks. The cooks are going to use sauté pans, hard top grills, ovens, steam boxes and possibly microwaves.   If you know that you are going ahead of time to these types of restaurants you should see if they can send you the menu ahead of time so that you can look it over.
    Hint: If you know your destination for any of your trip, see if you can get the menu before you arrive, as most places always have their menus prepared ahead of time. If you get the menu you can make up your Chef Daniel P Restaurant Form before you go.
    I would try to spell out your entire meal in great detail.  I also use this technique for all mom and pop restaurants.  You are not insulting a cook or chef by asking them to prepare your meal a certain way.  Every day the cook receives orders from the waitress on how to prepare a particular meal.  Just because you are giving the instructions yourself only means to the chef that you are very serious about how your food is prepared.
    What to Eat And How to Cook Your Meal
    In these type of restaurants that are small and have limited space you have to try to eliminate any mistakes that the cook might make. How…you ask?  Try some of these ideas:

    Notify them ahead a time if you can.  Let the train, boat or any restaurant know that you are coming.  Make sure you tell them the date, time and how many people will be receiving special meals. Don’t be upset if you get there and no one knows that you are coming, it is just part of the business. Have their phone number available so when you arrive in the city you can call a few hours before you arrive to eat.  Just remind them again that you are planning on eating at their restaurant and ask them when their slowest time is. If it is a train or boat ask if you can eat at the last seating time (unless they indicate that an earlier time is slower).  Feel them out to see when the best time is for you to order a specially prepared meal. During your phone call, ask who you should ask for when you do arrive for your meal. Make sure you arrive with your Chef Daniel P Restaurant Form and a pen or pencil. When you arrive ask for the manager or the person you talked to on the phone. Tell the manager in great detail about your special diet request.  Let them know you will be writing out your request that will specifically tell them how to prepare your meal. Ask if there is anything you should know about the kitchen or the chef—anything that could help you in preparing your meal and making it as safe as possible.
    You might have to ask the manager how they cook their food. Some are going to use a flat-top grill, broiler, steamer or even a microwave oven.  Once you find this out it is time to create your meal instructions and present them to the manager so he can deliver them to the cook.How the Cook Prepares Your Food:

    Sautéing: To me is one of the safest ways to have your food prepared.  No matter if the cooks are in a small or large kitchen.  This is how I might write it down for the cook to see:  “Sauté 1 whole chicken breast in olive oil, make sure the pan is very clean and does not have a crumb on it.”  When asking to sauté you can ask for them to make a quick sauce in the pan.  That is what I do, even if it is just to squeeze a lemon on your food, this can add some fresh flavor. Hard Top Grill:  I don’t recommend using this unless you are the very first ones to arrive.  During the day when they cook on the grill pieces of food stay on the grill for the whole day.  You can ask them to use the razor blade to scrape the grill.  Even using the razor blade it is not 100% and food from other meals may get on your food. Steamer: This is a good way to cook as long as your food is the only one in the steamer.  You can ask them to wrap the food and this will keep all crumbs off of your food.  Example:  “Please wrap a piece of salmon up with some saran wrap.  Place it on a holey pan so the steam can circle salmon." Microwave: This is great for potatoes or vegetables and a good way to keep food safe.  I always ask for my veggies to be micro-waved.  This is a great way to get a baked potato.  Even some fish and other entrees can be cooked in the microwave.  Example: “Could you please cook a potato and my vegetables in the microwave.  Put them in a dish then cover with saran wrap.” Fryer: You must stay away from a fryer in small kitchens (unlike fast food chains and some bigger restaurants).  They use the fryer for everything and that means that everything could be in it. When they cook your French fries, the crumbs from the chicken nuggets could get on your food. Boiling: This is another great way to cook food.  You must ask them to only cover the food product that they are cooking.  Some fishes, vegetables and other meats can be cooked this way. If they have a steamer I would ask for that first since they don’t have to wait for it to get hot. Example:  “I would like two eggs boiled or poached in just enough water to cover the entrée so it won’t take so long. You could have the cook put a small amount of water then cover the pan and steam it.” Broiler: Sometimes small kitchens that are moving are not going to have a broiler.  It is the fear of the open fire that could cause a fire in the kitchen.  If they do have one you could ask for this example:  “I would like a piece of salmon on a metal plate.  Cook it until it is done, then splash it with white wine before plating.”

     The main idea you take into small kitchens is this:  It is a lot like cooking at your home (unless you have a huge kitchen).  Those kitchens are made small but can put out large amount of meals if needed.  Those menus are made to accommodate the small amount of storage also.  You need to really know your menu and the ingredients they are using.  Unlike a large kitchen you might not have the extra supplies that a big kitchen has.  They just don’t have the room and you need to think of that.  So if it is a river boat or a train, when you look at the menu some of the items will be canned products, because canned products are so much easier to store than refrigerated items. As you look at the menu take the item you would like and ask them if they can cook it in a sauté pan or maybe in the oven.  This is a very safe way to have your food prepared.
    When I was employed at the resort and we would often have banquets for over 200 people. If the meal was New York strip steak we would put the steaks on the broiler and mark the diamond char marks in order to get the steaks cooked exactly at the same time. We would then pull the steaks off and put them on large sheet pans. Just before we needed the steak, we would put them in the ovens and cook them until they were the proper temperature. The customers never knew that the steaks were cooked in the oven and not the broiler. The char marks on the steak made everyone believe that it was broiled.
    The point is that you can have your food baked as long as you don’t get sick—for me that is the most important thing.  When I do eat out, I don’t care too much about the taste or temperature of the meal—my number one goal is that I get a gluten-free meal and that the restaurant doesn’t ruin my vacation.
    Also, you have to be very careful when you send your food back.   Just remember how busy the cooks are and whether or not they are going to remember your specially ordered meal when it comes back to them.  If they are busy in the back and the waitress says to the cook, “Cook it more,” what do you think happens—will they take as much time as they did the first time?  These are the types of questions that you have to ask yourself when you are sitting at your table and thinking about sending your meal back.
    I know that we all expect a perfect meal when we pay for it.  Sometimes it is just easier to ask them to only warm it up in the microwave. Something to think about is that the microwave is like a closed room where it is not likely that your food will get contaminated.  Most kitchens, especially smaller ones, have a microwave like the one that you use at home.  If you do need your meal cooked more, try to explain it to the manager and remind him that you will get very sick if it gets contaminated—ask the manager nicely if you can watch and see if the cook does it right.
    Another thing to remember when you are eating in these types of restaurants is that they are small and that means the kitchens are small too.  The cooks are going to be right next to each other—only arms and shoulders apart. Remember; if you don’t think they will be able to feed you properly always have a plan B, so you can still eat. Plan your meal to be as simple as possible for them to prepare and you will be able to conquer the Gluten Monster and have a wonderful train or boat experience!
    Chef Daniel P. 

    admin
    Celiac.com 08/14/2015 – Recently I took a last minute, end of Summer road trip with my family and on one of our pit stops I was delighted to discover the often rumored, highly elusive and possibly "Holy Grail" of gluten-free food: Subway's gluten-free sub rolls! Yes, I am here to tell you that they do indeed exist, even though I almost couldn't believe it even when I saw them—but there they were...a whole stack of six inch long gluten-free Subway rolls—sitting right in front of me in tidy, individually wrapped cellophane packages.
    I had to rub my eyes and look twice to make sure that I wasn't dreaming because I, like many people, believed that Subway had discontinued them after a temporary Oregon-only trial run, and had decided against a permanent gluten-free roll out. Apparently though, in Oregon at least (and perhaps in other states?), they are still going strong many months after their rumored demise. To top this off, they even offered a gluten-free brownie for dessert!
    Rather than getting stuck with a chopped Subway salad again I was finally able to order a real submarine sandwich—just like everyone else. So, I immediately honed in on an old favorite and decided to try their Spicy Italian sub on a gluten-free roll. What...no bewildered look on their faces when I asked for gluten-free? They seemed to know exactly what I wanted, and the employee who prepared my sandwich seemed to follow a carefully prepared script—she first cleaned off the prep counter, then changed into a new pair of clean gloves, and finally pulled out a new, clean sheet of paper onto which she set the packaged roll. The roll was pre-cut, thus she didn't have to use the bread knife to cut it, which was likely contaminated. While making the sandwich I was offered the option of having it toasted (some sensitive celiacs may want to skip the toaster oven part), and I noticed that when she toasted mine she made sure that it went into the oven solo, so that it would not touch other sandwiches (it was also on its original sheet of clean paper when it went in).
    At this point you are probably wondering how it tasted, right? It was simply fantastic! Why can't other companies make gluten-free bread taste like this? It was soft, strong and slightly chewy. It wasn't at all dry, and seemed very fresh. My wife wanted me to ask them if they were sold separately so that I could take some home with me, which I didn't do, but you get the idea—they were really good and tasted very fresh.
    I was so excited about the prospect of being able to once again eat Subway sandwiches that I ended up stopping at Subway several times during our road trip.
    Each time I visited a Subway in Oregon I noticed that other people were also ordering or eating gluten-free subs, and in each case the staff seemed to follow their gluten-free script perfectly. It is difficult to estimate the exact ratio of gluten-free customers from such a small sampling, but it seemed to me that around 10-20% of total visitors ordered the gluten-free roll. Most companies would do almost anything to grow their business by 10-20%, but in this case the opposite could be the case—businesses should be willing to offer gluten-free options so they don't lose 10-20% of their business! I certainly hope that Subway's Oregon test bed is going well, and that Subway has learned that offering gluten-free sub rolls is great for business.
    And now for the $64,000 question: Will Subway roll out their gluten-free rolls to other states, and if so, when? It's time for Subway to share the gluten-free love beyond just Oregon! Of course with the P.F. Chang's litigation still ongoing, they are likely now in a holding pattern to see how that case turns out.
    Have you seen gluten-free Subway rolls outside of Oregon? Please let us know below.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com