• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    74,205
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Jesse Geddes
    Newest Member
    Jesse Geddes
    Joined
  • Announcements

    • Scott Adams

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
  • 0

    Traveling Abroad and Eating Gluten-free


    Daniel Moran

    Celiac.com 05/20/2008 - I am going to be honest—I have not traveled outside the U.S.A. except for Mexico and Canada.  When I went to Mexico it was on a cruise ship, so that meant I could eat on the ship.  I would take snacks to tide me over or get a bag of chips.  Hopefully I will one day be able to tour the world and educate everyone on how to make true gluten-free meals for all of us.  I also hope that my when the time is right I will go on such trips with my loving wife.  So I will tell you how I would approach a trip to another country and you can decide if this is worth a try.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



     Planning for the Trip (All per emails and internet and phone calls)

    • I would contact the area chamber of commerce or tourist office in the country that I will be going to and see if they have heard of the gluten-free diet or celiac disease.
    • If I was staying at a hotel or resort I would ask them to look into gluten-free meals and if they have a kitchen where I could talk with the executive chef or manager of food and beverages.  I would also tell them that I am a chef from the U.S.A.
    • I would go to celiac.com to locate the nearest celiac support group to where I will be staying.  If there is one I would find out about local spots that I might be able to visit to get gluten-free meals, and if there are any bake shops or natural food stores where I could get some supplies and snacks.
    • I would find a book on the languages that they speak and make a chef Daniel restaurant form so I could eat in a restaurant.  I would have it in all the languages including English for the chef to make sure they understand I am very serous about my health.
    • I would have a card that said “May I speak to the manager and I have a special diet request.” Hopeful I could say that in their language. I would have a gluten-free restaurant card in their language and present it to the chef or manager.
    • I would have a safe and forbidden list in the language where I was visiting.  That way I could check foods from the store so I could eat snacks.
    • I would try to stay at a place with a microwave and possibly a refrigerator.  By doing this if I ran into a language problem I could cook chicken or meats in the microwave (I have cooked whole chickens in a microwave on vacation before and put it in the refrigerator for later).
    • I would carry cards with me to ask for directions or to ask a wait staff for something I might be able to eat.  Like maybe some cheese, beverage, snacks or any type food of the area that I might like.  If you were at a port on the ocean your card could be sauté seafood and with olive oil.  Even if I didn’t look at the menu I would know that because I am at a town on the water, they would have fresh fish coming in.
    • If any of you watch the Travel Channel  you know that there are a lot of different types of foods.  Being a chef I would want to experience all types of different foods.  If I knew something about the local cuisine and how it is prepared before I got there, it could give me an advantage. In Hong Kong I would love to eat some of the hot foods.  Could I eat them?  Is it just the chilies or is it the sauce?  Those are some of the questions I would wonder, so I would research the area and review cookbooks to see how they prepare their foods.
    • If I knew where I would be traveling I would try to contact a local restaurant beforehand to see if I could view their menu for the time when I would be visiting.  If I did this, I could make my Chef Daniel restaurant form up ahead of the visit.
    • I would make sure that when I was at my vacation spot I could get Internet access.  By doing this I could look up restaurants that I see when I am walking around to see if their menus were available online.  Also I would be able to translate a chef Daniel P restaurant form for that place if we decide to go there.
    • I would make sure that I had a phone with internet access to look up info at any time. Also with the phone I could translate a sentence with a Web site I know about.
    As you see I have put a great deal of thought into traveling, but not one of them has been tested.  I wish I could say that these ideas all worked for me and they will for you too.  My thought is that the greatest asset for us celiacs is the Chef Daniel P restaurant form you take into the restaurant.

    I would have every direction I could give on paper for the chef to see.  When I was cooking I cooked with chefs from around the world.  We all had the same common cause:  To make our customers happy so they will spread the word and come again.  So to me it doesn’t matter if they can read English or Spanish.  It comes down to me as the customer to tell them I have to have a gluten-free meal.  To tell them that if they don’t do as I ask, I could get very sick and it would be their fault, and no restaurant wants to hear that their food caused a person to get sick.

    If you are like me, you are going to want to taste some of the home town small restaurants.  I would know the area as mentioned before, and find out about any fresh vegetables or meats that I would like to try.  On my phone I would access the Internet and I would find information on the town I was in.  When I walked in I would ask for a manager, and if that person doesn’t speak English I would get one of my restaurant cards out to let them read what I am trying to say.  I also would try to read the card out so they could see that I am trying very hard to speak their language.  I believe that shows I am not a stuck up rich person who hires everyone to do what I want. If I mess it up, I would feel it is okay as long as I look like I am trying to commutate to them “I am very serous about my health.”  Asking them questions would be hard but I would have cards with questions on them and I would know what yes or no sound like.  If it was a small café I would ask to talk with the chef.  At least try to speak through my cards and being a chef I usually have no trouble seeing the kitchen.  It is an advantage to be a chef from a very popular resort that is known world wide and I would use that to my advantage.  Even if they never knew of me, I know my way around the kitchen and I would be able to look around to see if I could eat there. I would look to see:

    • Is it dirty or clean?
    • Does it look like they cut everything on the same cutting board?
    • Does the cook look very sloppy?
    Even if I don’t go to the back where the kitchen is, the dinning room represents the kitchen too.  I am not expecting a clean perfect kitchen.  I am expecting the cook who might be this little old lady who has had this restaurant in her family for four generations to care about me. That is what all restaurants usually want—if they care about their customers they will survive for years and years.  It is a hospitality business in America or in Russia—and it doesn’t matter what you language you speak.   That is when you don’t have to worry so much about the Gluten Monster.

    I would be honored to walk into some of these smaller kitchens of the world and find out about their history and who they have cooked for.  Just thinking about it gets me all wiggly in side.  You can tell a lot about a restaurant when you walk in—if you only take the time to notice.

    So when you plan your vacation as a celiac you need to keep this in mind:  It is just like over here and it will take you some time to order and eat.  If you are in a hurry, I suggest that you take your safe and forbidden lists to the store and get some snacks.  If you have the time you need to sit and relax and take a stab at eating restaurant food from another country.

    Chef Daniel P.


    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Restaurant cards in foreign languages can be purchased at this site. Also try Googling--some cards are online and you can print them for free (not as good as the ones you buy, however).

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest susan

    Posted

    Be brave! Travel---and eat gluten-free! I've been to Peru, Spain & Portugal (and that means airplane travel) since I realized I need a Gluten Free diet, and in many of these places it's been easier to get a meal than in the USA, as celiac is better known overseas than it is here. Three pieces of advice: 1.check out the local Gluten Free org's website for restaurants and stores (and print out local maps of a few of them). 2. Use them; and 3. have a local language card that explains the situation--you can tell pretty easily if it's understood or not.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Christine

    Posted

    I just came back from a trip to the Ukraine, Russia, Estonia and Finland. I was on a tour and so had the benefit of a program director to talk with a local person. However, I often needed to take care of myself in a restaurant. I took the language card from Jax Peters Lowell's the gluten-free bible (she has many different languages) and generally, did very well. I highlighted the part that asks to talk with a chef if they do not understand the request. I did take quite a few protein bars with me to use when I wasn't sure. I also requested the international airline to make gluten-free meals. In Finland they knew what this was about and even brought me gluten-free bread!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Myriam Kobylkevich

    Posted

    Celiac disease is well known and well handled in other countries. Besides, other cuisines are not as based on wheat as ours.

    When traveling in Spain and Uruguay, my son had no trouble finding gluten-free food. It's here in the US, that's difficult, because US doctors have been busy stating that celiac disease is rare here.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   2 Members, 1 Anonymous, 290 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Daniel Moran
    Celiac.com 05/05/2008 - We have all had our terrible times at a restaurant. It doesn't matter if it is your local diner or a 5 Star restaurant--it is hard to have somebody make our food if the smallest crumb can make you sick, then ruin your day or week. With a little preparation on your part, you can go on a cruise or dine on food made for a king or queen.
    Preparing for Your Travel
    The most important part of any travel is to prepare for it. If you are like our family you search for a fare that the family can afford.  You also have to go the extra step for your food. “PLEASE REMEMBER I GET VERY SICK FROM THE SMALLEST CRUMB SO I GOT TO BE SO CAREFUL OR I AM SICK FOR 5 DAYS.”  Not every one is like me but I am one of the worst cases so I have to be extra careful. Judge for yourself and decide what you can handle and how extreme you need to be.
    When you are looking for a place to sleep if you are booking your motels ahead of time it is nice to try to get a microwave and refrigerator in your room. Most chains have a few rooms with microwaves in them so ask for it. During our trip to Las Vegas I cooked a whole chicken in the microwave and then cooled it and put it in our little fridge.  When I got hungry and my wife got pizza or a burger and I just didn’t trust the place I would wait and go to my room to eat. You don’t have to go that far, but if you like a canned or other product you can pick it up from a local grocery store and then warm it up.
    Don’t forget to ask, especially if you are staying at a resort or a hotel with restaurant, whether they have a gluten-free menu.  Not every restaurant knows about the "Gluten Monster." Eventually we will get out the word and the world will cook for us.
    One time when we were traveling we found a little deli that was just across from the hotel and they prepared gluten free-food if you ordered a day ahead.   My wife ordered some gluten-free bread sticks for our dinner. We picked them up and brought them to dinner.  The restaurant didn’t have a problem with this and they said that for the next meal they would have someone pick up our food from there if we wished.
    Perform Internet searches for the area where you will be staying and look for any advertised gluten-free restaurants or health food stores. Also check to see if there is a local celiac group.  The local celiac support group will know of restaurants and stores in that and can make other important suggestions.  You can find some of this info right here at celiac.com.  The celiac groups can be reached by email and they will know of all the important information that you can use during a trip to their area. This also goes for any trips outside the USA.
    You should be prepared for your trip. You know where you’re staying and you already have got some contacts with fellow celiacs in the area and where you can eat. Let’s start by getting your paper work ready.

     You need your gluten-free list of ingredients.  The safe or forbidden list if you are not sure what you can and can’t eat. You need a gluten-free restaurant card.  This is what you use when you go to a restaurant to let the cook or chef know that you are a celiac and your food needs special handling. You should make plenty of copies of them to last for your trip, and it needs to be in the language that is common for the place you are going.  If you are going into Mexico it needs to be in English and Spanish. If you are bringing spices to put on your food, I some times like to bring a small amount of a Cajon spice that I make up.  I ask for my food not to be spiced in the kitchen because in the resorts that I have worked at we would make our own salt and pepper mixtures to season the food and everybody used it--meaning everyone’s hands, including crumbs could be in it.  Bring your own gluten-fre soy sauce and other sauces like hot sauce. Make sure you have all your gluten-free information. The restaurants, delis and any thing you need plus the directions and phone numbers.  Don’t get there and find out that you have just ended up on the wrong side of the tracks. Keep all of this in a folder nice and tidy so you know where it is.
    If you have to drive I found it very easy to stop at a fast food place.  The kids like it and if you haven’t noticed most of them keep it very clean and that is very important to us. Ask for your food to be made fresh. Even at fast food restaurants mistakes can happen and if you ask for a salad right from the counter it could have bread on it.  They will prepare your food fresh if you ask and be nice and tell them you have a special diet and you will get very sick from a crumb.Ask for the manager at this fast food place to help you.  The manager is going to be someone who has worked at the restaurant longer than a week and will care more.  Again tell them you have a special diet request and you could get very ill if you vary a crumb.  It’s a crap shoot that the manager might prepare your food or will tell some one to make it for you.
    When you go to the fast food place you don’t have to eat salads only.  I go and ask for “Double burger with cheese and lettuce, tomatoes, onions.”  No sauces, catsup, mustard, mayo or pickles.  Ask for the packets that are for to go and you can read what the ingredients are in them.  I ask them to prepare it for me and I watch to make sure they use a clean fork that I hand them or if they put fresh gloves on. With these fast food restaurants you can see all the way to the back and I love that. Order some French fries if you know they are gluten-free and you’re on your way. Make sure if you do order French fries that they only cook French fries in that fryer and they cook nothing else in them. If you eat at any restaurant you must ask them if they are made in a dedicated fryer.
    Some fast food places have chicken breast and other food so again, you don’t just have to eat salads. If you don’t stop at a fast food place and it is not on your list of gluten-free places you should get out one of your “Chef Daniel Letters” to give to the chefs in the back.  Be prepared to wait longer.  When you arrive ask the waiter or matre’d if they have a gluten-free menu.
    If they have gluten-free menu that is great but the gluten-free menus I have seen don’t give the restaurant its due.  They just put a few items on the menu like salad and a steak and expect that to feed everyone…WRONG.  Chef Daniel wants to eat what I want not what they tell me what I can eat.  I mean if my wife can have chicken, pork, shrimp, lobster, lamb and that entire menu why can I only get three things? I AM A BIG BOY…one of my pet peeves is this limited choices offered by most gluten-free menus.
    It is so much easier to talk with the manager when you come in and explain that you have a special diet request and you will get very ill than it is to explain it to the wait staff who have 12 tables and could care less about you because the manager is yelling at them to get to the next table or that an order is up.
    If you don’t order from the gluten free menu and you see something else on it you might like you have to ask questions:

    Is the product marinated before it is cooked? If it is you can’t have it. Like a chicken teriyaki. Can it be thawed if it is in the freezer? They have all of the chicken or pork in a marinade but they have some in the freezer and could they microwave it to thaw it so you can have it. What type of broiler do they use if you’re asking for your food to broil and can it be cleaned before you have your food broiled?  Food stays on the broiler for a while so it must be steel brushed, or the chicken teriyaki he just cooked could be on your broiled steak.  The over the head broilers can have the grills lifted up to the flame and it will cook everything away. If the waiter or manager can’t answer your questions you should look to see if you can ask for the cook. Before you ask for the cook you should look around the dining hall and if it is extremely busy remember you are not the only one there and asking for a cook might really upset them. If it is slow the chef or cook won’t mind coming out.  If it looks too busy you should only ask the manager or keep it very simple.
    When you decide what you are eating I like to put down on the paper exactly how to cook my food (Chef Daniel P. form). Do I want it pan fried or broiled? If I have it broiled I ask them to steel brush the grill.  Your Chef Daniel slip should ask them to use a fresh tong, knives, cutting board and even a fresh cloth if they wipe your plate.    I give them as much direction I can think of so they know I am very serious about my special diet and that if prepared wrong in any way I will get very ill.Real World Here
     I have gone to a restaurant and did everything I said--triple checked and the salad came out with croutons on it. I am polite to the wait staff and tell them again that I can’t have any bread on my salad. Then I gave it back to the wait staff and sat and waited for a new salad and I received the salad I JUST GAVE THEM TO TAKE BACK and they simply took the croutons off the salad and brought it right back to me!
    Don’t be afraid to say “Hey you just brought me the same salad back and I can see the crumbs from the croutons.” Oh yeah that is a true story. Check your food carefully when it comes out to you.  If you see the tiniest piece of something that doesn’t look right say NO WAY.  You order a steak and you see a bit of carrot on it THAT PROBALLY MEANS HE USED TONGS THAT HE USED TO PICK UP CARROTS WITH. The carrots are not on your plate.  My wife has to deal with me when we go out to eat but I have no choice because the smallest crumb takes me out for four days. I’d rather go hungry then get sick. When that salad came out I gave them one chance and if they don’t do it right I don’t take the chance with the local “hot head” cook to get one over on me.  I POLITLY SAY “NO THANK YOU,  I DON’T WANT TO EAT HERE ANYMORE” . It’s my money, my health and sadly, during the subsequent four days that I am sick they don’t care about me, so I’d rather get some cheese or chips or something simple. In these cases I leave the restaurant and they take my food off of the bill because I don’t eat a thing.
    So always have an alternative plan if you can’t eat.  My wife and kids can eat but if I don’t feel the right vibe in the restaurant I must move on, and you should to.  It’s not hard for any restaurant to make a burger and fries for the family so let them eat and you move on to plan B.  Again each person’s tolerance is different so you have to make up your mind but it is your trip and your health.
    When you are on the road you have to choose your restaurant and always have a plan B.  I choose the fast food because I can watch them make my food. You might like to be pampered so pick a nice restaurant and try to make sure it is not during peak hours--this will help a lot.
    I hope this is Helpful
    Chef Daniel P.
    I will continue with staying at hotels and motels in my next article.


    Hallie Davis
    Celiac.com 10/02/2009 - My hubby and I just returned from a wonderful 5 days in Florida’s Key West, and so I want to write about it  while it is fresh in my memory, for I think my experience may benefit others who are trying to stay gluten-free during a stay there.
    In preparation for this trip, I first made a list of the top 20 rated hotels and bed and breakfasts (B& according to information I found on the internet. I made a separate list of restaurants, bars, and health food stores that also had received good reviews as to being able to provide gluten-free food. We had heard that it is not necessary to rent a car on Key West, so I wanted our hotel to be close to as many of the gluten-free sources of food as possible. So then I found each hotel on Mapquest, and then used the “find nearby” feature to get a list of restaurants near each, noting how many were also on my gluten-free list.
    I discovered that two hotels dominated in being close to multiple restaurants of my gluten-free list: The Gardens Hotel, and Seascape An Inn. Both were close to the main street, which is Duval Street. The Gardens was also close to Pepe’s, Santiago Bodegas, Mangoes, Help Yourself, The Café, Sugar Apple, and Blue Heaven. On the other Hand, Seascape was slightly closer to Duval Street, just around the corner from Hemingway House, and close to Sugar apple, Blue Heaven, Mangoes, and Santiago Bodega’s.
    I called both to get prices. The Gardens Hotel said they charged $185 per night. Seascape said they could give us an off-season discount, bringing our stay down to 109 per night. No contest. We booked with Seascape. When talking with the wonderful Koko, at Seascape, I told him that I was gluten-free, and he said that they would be sure to have boiled eggs, a large selection of cut-up fresh fruits (strawberries, cantelope, honeydew, fresh pineapple, dried apricots), and gluten-free yogurt at their breakfast buffet. He was as good as his word.
    Seascape is owned by Marcia and Dave, who took over ownership last December, and did some renovations. Marcia personally greeted us when we arrived. She had us put our luggage away in our room, and treated us to our choice of a complimentary glass of our choice of red or white wine or beer. Only after we had relaxed for a moment did she register us. Then she talked to us about places to go and things to see, marking both our hotel location, and the locations of some other places on a map that she gave to us. We gabbed a bit, and I found out that Marcia is a delightful person, and used to be a registered nurse in my home state. Then she showed me her capacious coupon drawer, and loaded me down with discount coupons for the various tourist sights and restaurants. That saved us considerable money! She called Blue Heaven for me and found out it was closed for the “off-season.” Too bad, but we did well without it.
    Throughout our stay, here and there I noticed the industriousness of Dave and Martha: Dave out bright and early in the morning skimming fallen leaves from the pool or using a longhandled loping saw to trim falling fruits off of the Chrismas Tree Palm. Martha cleaning, dusting, and polishing everything to perfection.
    As I entered the lovely garden courtyard for the first time, I was immediately greeted by one of the 3 resident cats, Fred, the sociable and laid-back tabby who often has just enough tongue sticking out to be comical. I sat down on one of the deck chairs, and it did not take much coaxing before he jumped up into my lap, and stayed for a good, long time enjoying being “scratched” behind the ears, petted, and massaged.
    Our room had French doors which opened onto garden the courtyard with its 10-person heated spa. The room had a ceiling fan. The beds had lovely fluffy comforters with 3 pillows at each head. This was one of the rooms that Koko had told us was freshly renovated. And it had a hint of that clean scent of Lysol that I appreciate in a hotel room. Above the bathroom sink on a shelf was a vase with a fresh sprig of baby’s breath. In a candy dish on the bedside table were gluten free chocolates and little Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups which are also gluten-free. In the capacious closet were real wooden hangers, not those silly thingies without hooks. Also in the closet were a refrigerator, full ironing board and steam iron, electric blanket for wintertime, luggage rack, and a coffeemaker with all the fixings to make coffee in the room. There was a sizeable flat-screen TV, and a programmable radio-alarm clock with various choices of alarm sounds. The basket of bathroom supplies included not just bar soap, but also body wash; not just shampoo, but also conditioner. On the wall next to the sink was a powerful hair dryer. There was a clean folded dark blue towel designated for use when removing makeup. The rest of the towels, hand towels and wash cloths were snowy white. The shower looked new, shiny, and sparkling clean.
    We had arrived late in the day, so after we were settled in our room we just wanted to have dinner and then return for a nice soak in the spa. I tested the water, and it was a bit cool for me (I have Raynaud’s), so I asked Marcia if they could raise the thermostat on it just slightly. She said “Absolutely!” I asked for an extension cord for my CPAP machine and she was quick to bring one to our room. When we returned from dinner, we had our soak in the spa, and the temperature was perfect! There was a basket of large towels laid out, and a basket for putting used towels into when done.
    In the morning, we discovered that once we had loaded our  breakfast plates and poured our free Champaign mimosas, they could be taken to the covered porch at the side of the house, which had little glass-topped tables. All around were orchids in full bloom – about 8 different kinds. There was a cooling breeze on the porch. Fred and Blackie joined us there, probably hoping for a handout, but polite enough not to ask. 
    Now about dinner. Our first and last dinner of our stay were both at Santiago Bodega’s (SB). Marcia had told us that they had a half-priced tapas special early in the week during the off-season. So we went there.
    There were certain standouts on the Tapas menu at SB. We absolutely loved the dates stuffed with goat cheese, and wrapped with Canadian bacon. Be sure to squeeze a bit of your lime over them. Yum! The beef tenderloin with melted goat cheese on top was to die for. Double-yum! The chicken skewers were also delicious, as were the pork with mango salsa. However, truth be told, the mango salsa was more like raisin salsa, with only a couple tiny bits of mango, and all the rest raisins. The green bean and the asparagus tapas were also tasty. The sangria (you can have your choice of red or white) was also delicious. I should caution that the servings though delicious, seem skimpy, so if you don’t want to break the bank trying to get full, either go on a night when there is a half price special, or follow up your dinner with a trip to Better Than Sex Desserts (see below). Both times we were there, SB had no gluten-free deserts.
    We went to Mangoes twice: once for dinner and once for frozen daiquiri and frozen pina colada and shrimp cocktail. The dinner was scrumptious. We started out with a wonderful salad (big enough to be split in two) of chopped fresh mango, shrimp, lettuce, onion, heart of palm, bacon, etc.) It was yummy! Then my hubby, who is not gluten-free ordered a lobster stuffed with crabmeat. Unfortunately I couldn’t have that because the crab was mixed with a bit of bread. However, hubby shared an untainted bit of the lobster with me, and it was sweet, juicy and succulent. I had the broiled Grouper with broiled tomatoes, served on a bed of rice and asparagus. It was delicious!
    Sloppy Joe’s at 201 Duval Street was also on our list of restaurants. I’m not sure why. They had absolutely nothing on the menu that was gluten-free except for the Havana Nachos. Those were good though: a serving large enough for two, with lots of sliced olives, chopped tomatoes, chopped onions, grated white cheese mixed in, and then chedder on top and melted over it all. It was served with on-the-side containers of sour cream and salsa.
    And remember that there is a Wendy’s at 355 Duval. Be sure to print out their gluten free menu and take it in your purse, so you can know what is safe to order there. One day we had baked potatoes with chives and sour cream, and Cokes, to hold us until a late dinner.
    We had a great time! If you go, be sure to take the Fury glass bottom boat trip. Time it to take the one that is scheduled so as to include the Champaign toast to the sunset on your return from seeing the reef. Then as the boat docks, go over to the Mallory Square sunset celebration to see the various entertainers: tightrope-walking dogs, cats jumping through hoops of fire, magicians, mimes, etc. Lot’s of fun. On your first day, take the on-and-off trolly tour, learning about the history of the island. Be sure to get off and see the butterfly museum, Hemingway House, the Audubon museum, and the Mel Fisher museam that tells about his reclaimation of $200 million in sunken treasure. Explore the various art galleries higher up Duval Street. Buy souvenir T-shirts for your children or nieces and nephews. Enjoy seeing the 6-toed cats, and roosters everywhere! Soak in the spa every evening after dinner.
    I have saved perhaps one of my favorite places for last: Better Than Sex Desserts. Marcia told us about this little dessert and wine restaurant just through the alley from her B&B. We went there after a light dinner elsewhere. We were greeted at the door by the owners: Len Johnson. His wife, Dani is the chef and chocolatier. She came over to talk to me about their gluten-free offering: the “Tongue Bath Truffle.” She was a delightful person, and I really enjoyed talking with her. Anyway, I ordered this dark, rich gluten-free wheatless truffle cake, served dusted with confectioner’s sugar, and dollups of whipped cream. Also served with it was my choice of various sorbets and sherbets. I opted for the raspberry sorbet. Hubby ordered the fresh strawberries to be dipped in a bowl of decadent warm chocolate sauce. We also ordered wine with the dessert, and a decaf coffee for me which had a faint suggestion of cinnamon – great with the dessert. As we were practically groaning with pleasure over these deserts, a live musician was playing the guitar and singing wonderful old songs. My hubby requested two of my favorite songs: Sweet Lorraine, and Nature Boy. I asked for a second cup of decaf in order to stay and listen more. What a lovely end to our evening and our week at Key West!
    Disclaimer: I am not related to Marcia, Dave, Koko, Len, or Dani, or anyone else in Key West! I just know that if anyone deserves to do well in business, it’s them at the Seascape An Inn, and at Better than Sex Desserts. Do give them your business! You won’t be sorry!


    Connor Burns
    If you have ever traveled to Newport, RI then you know there are plenty of great restaurants to choose from. But if you have celiac disease or a gluten-intolerance then you know that dining out in an unfamiliar city is very difficult. Luckily, Newport has many gluten-free friendly restaurants that can easily be found if you know about them. I have comprised a list of celiac friendly restaurants in this scenic, colonial city. These restaurants have responded to a survey that was sent to over 100 restaurants and bakeries in Newport. All of the places listed have also stated that they are familiar with the necessary precautions that come with preparing gluten-free food such as avoiding cross-contamination. I have attempted to verify the accuracy of the statements provided by the restaurants to the best of my ability. If you are a tourist or local, I hope this list can help in keeping your gluten-free lifestyle.

    Places that offer gluten-free menus:
    Brick Alley Pub
    140 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-6334
    www.BrickAlley.comEva Ruth's Specialty Bakery
    796 Aquidneck Avenue Middletown, RI
    (401) 619-1924
    www.EvaRuths.com
    * Eva Ruth's is located 10 minutes out of downtown Newport and specializes in making only gluten-free products.
    O'Briens Pub
    501 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-6623
    www.theobrienspub.com
    Safari Room at Ocean Cliff (Sunday brunch menu)
    65 Ridge Road Newport, RI
    (401) 849-4873
    www.newportexperience.com
    Tucker's Bistro
    150 Broadway Newport, RI
    (401) 846-3449
    www.tuckersbistro.com
    Yesterday's and the Place
    28 Washington Square Newport, RI
    (401) 847-0116
    www.yesterdaysandtheplace.com

    Places that are familiar with gluten-free foods and offer gluten-free options:
    A Little Café
    27 Connell Highway Newport, RI
    (401) 849-0123
    www.Alittlecafe.usBouchard Restaurant and Inn
    505 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 846-0123
    www.bouchardnewport.com
    Callahan's Café Zelda
    528 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-4002
    www.cafezelda.com
    Castle Hill Inn
    590 Ocean Drive Newport, RI
    (401) 324-4522
    www.castlehillinn.com
    * Castle Hill Inn is working with Eva Ruth's bakery to offer more gluten-free options.
    Diego's
    11 Bowen's Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 619-2640
    www.diegosnewport.com
    Fathoms Restaurant at the Newport Marriott
    25 Americas Cup Avenue Newport, RI
    (401) 849-7788
    Fluke Wine Bar and Kitchen
    41 Bowens Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 849-7778
    www.flukewinebar.com
    Gas Lamp Grille
    206 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 845-9300
    www.gaslampgrille.com
    * Gas Lamp Grille is in the process of creating a gluten-free menu.
    It's My Party Bake Shoppe
    84 William Street Newport, RI
    (401) 619-4600
    www.itsmypartynewport.com
    * Must call in advance to place an order for gluten-free products at It's My Party Bake Shoppe.
    Lucia Italian Restaurant
    186 B Thames Street Newport RI
    (401) 846-4477
    www.luciarestaurant.com
    Mamma Luisa Restaurant
    673 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 848-5257
    www.mammaluisa.com
    SAPO Freaky Burrito
    16 Broadway Newport, RI
    (401) 847-1526
    www.freakyburrito.com
    Sardellas Restaurant
    30 Memorial Boulevard W Newport, RI
    (401) 849-6312
    www.sardellas.com
    * Sardella's carries gluten-free pasta, but it is recommended that you call in first to make sure that they have it in stock.
    Sushi-go
    215 Goddard Row Newport, RI
    (401) 849-5155
    www.sushi-go.com
    Tallulah on Thames
    464 Thames Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-2433
    www.Tallulahonthames.com
    The Barking Crab Restaurant
    151 Swinburne Row Newport, RI
    (617) 206-8294
    www.barkingcrab.com
    The Mooring Seafood Kitchen
    1 Sayer's Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 846-2260
    www.mooringrestaurant.com
    The Smokehouse Café
    31 Scotts Wharf Newport, RI
    (401) 848-9800
    The White Horse Tavern
    26 Marlborough Street Newport, RI
    (401) 849-3600
    www.whitehorsetavern.us
    *Some of these restaurants may only offer naturally gluten-free items, but will be more than willing to accommodate any changes to their options if asked


    Melissa Reed
    Celiac.com 07/24/2014 - People that have celiac disease know one of the main concerns is avoiding gluten when they have meals. Their second biggest concern is the possible co-mingling of ingredients that can contaminate otherwise gluten-free food! So how do you eat at restaurants when you have celiac and still have peace of mind?
    Here is how:
    Before you are to go out to a restaurant call ahead and ask for the manager, find out if they do offer gluten-free meals that are carefully prepared for people with food allergy (If you are unable to call ahead go online and look the restaurant up to see if they offer a gluten-free menu or gluten-free meal selections, if need be email them). Also ask if the restaurant prepares gluten-free meals in a separate area, and if the restaurant uses different cooking utensils for gluten-free meal preparation. When you arrive at the restaurant that you have confirmed has gluten-free meals, let your server know you have a "Gluten Allergy" (ok, you can use different terms, and this isn't correct, but it conveys necessity instead of trend) and must eat gluten-free. Ask for a gluten-free menu, if they did not offer one to you. If you feel comfortable ask to speak with the manager or chef at your table, so they know that you have a medical need for a gluten-free diet. Let your favorite restaurants know that you want gluten-free meal selections and a gluten-free menu if they do not offer that yet. Do not be afraid to ask! Also, online there are cards you can print out and take to restaurants that you can give to server, manager or chefs to let them know that you are in need of a gluten-free diet. Some restaurants are now getting trained for gluten-free food preparation through National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) and Great Kitchens, so that all the staff is fully prepared and educated on how to handle safe preparation of meals for celiac and gluten intolerant individuals.
    Talk about peace of mind; if a restaurant has had the gluten-free food training, know you are safe to eat gluten-free meals there!

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
    For a couple of decades now, scientists have been searching for a biological Rosetta stone that would allow them to engineer proteins with precision, but the problem has remained dauntingly complex.  Researchers had a pretty good understanding of the very simple way that the linear chemical code carried by strands of DNA translates into strings of amino acids in proteins. 
    But, one of the main problems in protein engineering has to do with the way proteins fold into their various three-dimensional structures. Until recently, no one has been able to decipher the rules that will predict how proteins fold into those three-dimensional structures.  So even if researchers were somehow able to design a protein with the right shape for a given job, they wouldn’t know how to go about making it from protein’s building blocks, the amino acids.
    But now, scientists like William DeGrado, a chemist at the University of California, San Francisco, and David Baker, director for the Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington, say that designing proteins will become at least as important as manipulating DNA has been in the past couple of decades.
    After making slow, but incremental progress over the years, scientists have improved their ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes. Among other things, they’ve gained a better understanding of how then the laws of physics cause the proteins to snap into folded origami-like structures based on the ways amino acids are attracted or repelled by others many places down the chain.
    It is this new ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes that has fueled their progress. UCSF’s DeGrado is using these new breakthroughs to search for new medicines that will be more stable, both on the shelf and in the body. He is also looking for new ways to treat Alzheimer’s disease and similar neurological conditions, which result when brain proteins fold incorrectly and create toxic deposits.
    Meanwhile, Baker’s is working on a single vaccine that would protect against all strains of the influenza virus, along with a method for breaking down the gluten proteins in wheat, which could help to generate new treatments for people with celiac disease. 
    With new computing power, look for progress on the understanding, design, and construction of brain proteins. As understanding, design and construction improve, look for brain proteins to play a major role in disease research and treatment. This is all great news for people looking to improve our understanding and treatment of celiac disease.
    Source:
    Bloomberg.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.
    But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by  “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it.
    With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether.
    A few of the choice tweets include the following:  
    “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt.
    Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions:
    Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender.
    Dish into bowls.
    Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. 
    Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
    The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow.
    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com