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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Gluten Sensitivity Without Celiac Disease

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 09/28/2012 - Two researchers recently set out to study gluten sensitivity in people without celiac disease. The study was conducted by A. Di Sabatino A, and G.R. Corazza of the Centro per lo Studio e la Curia della Mallatia Celiaca at the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo at the University of Pavia in Italy.

    Photo: CC--teuobkA number of studies support the existence non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which can be marked by both internal and external symptoms in individuals with normal small-bowel mucosa and negative results on serum anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibody testing. These symptoms are very similar to traditional celiac disease symptoms, and seem to improve or disappear with the adoption of a gluten-free diet.

    Although researchers are currently debating the clinical aspects of this condition, studies indicate that the prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the general population may be many times higher than that of celiac disease.

    Further study and diagnosis of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is being hindered by the lack of a clear definition of the condition. The lack of a clear definition is due at least in part to the fact that there is no single known cause, and the symptoms are likely influenced by a variety of factors.

    More work needs to be done to establish a clear definition for non-celiac gluten intolerance, and to delineate diagnostic protocols. The research team notes that if it turns out that non-celiac gluten sensitivity does in fact have multiple triggers, then treatment options should vary accordingly.

    However, any treatment would likely include a gluten-free diet.

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    Non celiac gluten sensitivity is ME, with the addition of dairy, egg and bean sensitivity.|The allergist I consulted said I'm not allergic to ANYTHING but as long as I follow my diet I am symptom free, but get into trouble whenever I cheat.

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    My gluten sensitivity is different from any others that I have heard about. It causes what I think is heart pains. My heart beats harder and faster and then I have whole chest pains that go into my arms and jaw. Just a tiny bit of gluten causes me not to be able to sleep at night.

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    I had my first IBS/coeliac type symptoms in February 2012. (I have Hashimoto's and Grave's disease diagnosed in 2009.) After researching a bit, I went gluten-free in April and within two days most of these symptoms disappeared, like magic, along with others that I had had for longer, such as muscle pains in the upper arms. The rest of the symptoms gradually faded over the following weeks. I had suffered from really bad migraines since puberty and these are now greatly reduced in severity and frequency as to hardly need medication. Blood tests were not conclusive as to gluten sensitivity, or allergy as I was already following a gluten-free diet before the tests, and no way would I go back to eating gluten just to demonstrate to others what I already know! No more gluten for me, ever.

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    My gluten sensitivity is different from any others that I have heard about. It causes what I think is heart pains. My heart beats harder and faster and then I have whole chest pains that go into my arms and jaw. Just a tiny bit of gluten causes me not to be able to sleep at night.

    Hi Jackie, just wanted you to know that my heart beats faster and harder after eating also! I do not have the arm and jaw pain. Not yet, anyway. I also have a few other symptoms that don't seem to be mainstream either. Wish there was an easy way to live with this!

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    Guest Beverly Kendrick

    Posted

    I have been eating gluten-free totally for a year now. Most of my eating has been gluten-free for over 10 years. I had the gluten test September 19. 2012. The results came back I didn't have celiac disease. I ate a little gluten for two days. I got very sick. I got told I was seeing the wrong doctor. I will see a different doctor November 6 and take the test again. That is why I tried to eat gluten again. I will probably get told to eat gluten for 4-6 weeks. I will get very sick. I have had allergy tests that let me know I have the allergy. I have allergies to at least 5 gluten-free flours. I do my own cooking. I had a severe reaction to the band they used on my arm. I had told them not to use that material. It is still bothering me 3 weeks later.

     

    I take the Stem tech Nutritional Supplements daily. They really help me out.

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    My gluten sensitivity is different from any others that I have heard about. It causes what I think is heart pains. My heart beats harder and faster and then I have whole chest pains that go into my arms and jaw. Just a tiny bit of gluten causes me not to be able to sleep at night.

    Me too! My heart races and feels like it's pounding out of my chest.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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