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    Twelve Mistakes That Can Ruin Your Gluten-free Diet


    Jefferson Adams


    • Learn to avoid these twelve common mistakes can ruin your gluten-free diet.


    Twelve Mistakes That Can Ruin Your Gluten-free Diet
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Kurtis Garbutt

    Celiac.com 07/19/2018 - Maintaining a gluten-free diet can be an on-going challenge, especially when you factor in all the hidden or obscure gluten that can trip you up. In many cases, foods that are naturally gluten-free end up contain added gluten. Sometimes this can slip by us, and that when the suffering begins. To avoid suffering needlessly, be sure to keep a sharp eye on labels, and beware of added or hidden gluten, even in food labeled gluten-free.  Use Celiac.com's SAFE Gluten-Free Food List and UNSAFE Gluten-free Food List as a guide.


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    Also, beware of these common mistakes that can ruin your gluten-free diet. Watch out for:

    1. Watch out for naturally gluten-free foods like rice and soy, that use gluten-based ingredients in processing. For example, many rice and soy beverages are made using barley enzymes, which can cause immune reactions in people with celiac disease.
    2. Be careful of bad advice from food store employees, who may be misinformed themselves. For example, many folks mistakenly believe that wheat-based grains like spelt or kamut are safe for celiacs. Be careful when taking advice.
    3. Beware of cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains, often via the food scoops.
    4. Be careful to avoid wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter surface, etc.
    5. Watch out for hidden gluten in prescription drugs. Ask your pharmacist for help about anything you’re not sure about, or suspect might contain unwanted gluten.
    6. Watch out for hidden gluten in lotions, conditioners, shampoos, deodorants, creams and cosmetics, (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis).
    7. Be mindful of stamps, envelopes or other gummed labels, as these can often contain wheat paste. Use a sponge to moisten such surfaces.
    8. Be careful about hidden gluten in toothpaste and mouthwash.
    9. Be careful about common cereal ingredients, such as malt flavoring, or other non-gluten-free ingredient.
    10. Be extra careful when considering packaged mixes and sauces, including soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc., as many of these can contain wheat or wheat by-product in their manufacture. Be especially careful about gravy mixes, packets & canned soups.
    11. Even some brands of rice paper can contain gluten, so be careful.
    12. Lastly, watch out for foods like ice cream and yogurt, which are often gluten-free, but can also often contain added ingredients that can make them unsuitable for anyone on a gluten-free diet.

    Eating Out? If you eat out, consider that many restaurants use a shared grill or shared cooking oil for regular and gluten-free foods, so be careful. Also, watch for flour in otherwise gluten-free spices, as per above. Ask questions, and stay vigilant.


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    Summation: don't eat anything that has been packaged and processed.

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    Guest Mary B.

    Posted

    The fact that there is gluten in envelope glue is a myth.

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    Well, it is not in my country, the Netherlands. I just licked at one envelope and immediately my lips started itching and swelling

     

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    just use the peel and stick ones.  i lick nothing that doesn't list ingredients.

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    I Also Only use peel label & then stick letter envelopes as well, the pain is not worth the regular type gluten glue licking type of All envelopes. It makes me so sick I feel like I could almost die. 

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    Hey all, I worked for an envelope manufacturer about 10 yrs ago and I will say that reaction or no reaction to the glue, please don't lick envelopes. The glue isn't really regulated and there is some gross stuff in it....mostly from things crawling around in the warehouse.

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    20 hours ago, JG27 said:

    Hey all, I worked for an envelope manufacturer about 10 yrs ago and I will say that reaction or no reaction to the glue, please don't lick envelopes. The glue isn't really regulated and there is some gross stuff in it....mostly from things crawling around in the warehouse.

    I can not even imagine...ugh! Thanks for he heads up!

     

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    I was just sampling horchata flavored ice cream in a grocery store, and the sample lady assured me it was gluten-free and that she fully understood how important it was.  I ate it, felt the diffuse abdominal pain that happens to me when I'm glutened.  Went and looked at the container, and sure enough, there was wheat in there.  Not sure why, as there weren't cookie/brownie/cake bites, and nothing else that normally indicates wheat ingredients, but yes...that ice cream was, in fact, full of gluten.  

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    Wendy Cohan
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    Ten Things to Try if You Accidentally Eat Gluten
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    Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N
    The 10 Most Common Mistakes People Make When Dealing with Gluten Intolerance
    Celiac.com 02/22/2018 - I am writing this article hoping to help those who have been diagnosed with gluten intolerance but who are still not feeling well, as well as for those who need to be diagnosed or will be in the future.
    Just to clarify our terms, I use 'gluten intolerance' as an umbrella term to encompass both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.
    I have the privilege of speaking with many individuals, on a weekly basis, who not only live in the locality of my clinic but also those who live across the United States and internationally. Just a few days ago I had phone consultations with individuals living in Shanghai, Philadelphia and Los Angeles.
    My clinic, HealthNOW Medical Center, is a destination clinic where we treat individuals who live at a distance as well as those who live nearby, hence these particular calls. As a result of doing such consultations and receiving responses to my lectures, books, blogs and videos, I have an opportunity to speak with many people and hear their stories.
    Frankly I often wish I had the ability to 'beam them up' utilizing the fictional technology from Star Trek—it would make travel logistics a piece of cake and I'd be able to help more people faster.
    Getting back to reality, I want to review the most common mistakes and misconceptions that I run into with people who are gluten intolerant. These miscues are resulting in ill health both currently and in the individual's future.
    Here's a list of 10:
    1. People who are pretty convinced of their sensitivity based on their own experimentation but who later abandon their own knowledge when a celiac test is negative.
    Discussion: Firstly, they should know that celiac testing is not highly sensitive. If it were, we would be diagnosing more than 5% of the celiacs in this country.
    Secondly, a negative celiac test is NOT an absolute indicator that one doesn't have the disease, it in no way tests for gluten sensitivity, a serious condition affecting likely fifteen times the number of people who have celiac disease.
    Finally, the gold standard test that we utilize here at HealthNow is one that has been established by other researchers to be quite reliable. It is the very test that this person is now ignoring. Namely, eliminating gluten for 30 days to see how you feel. A noticeable improvement in symptoms is a valid test.
    Too often I speak with people who are quite seriously ill. They have ignored, sometimes for years, something they knew to be the truth simply because an insensitive lab test didn't corroborate their own identification of gluten intolerance.
    Don't ignore the knowledge you possess about your body. If you need a lab test to affirm that knowledge, there's always genetic testing for both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Entero Labs has a good test for both.
    2. Some people discover they are gluten intolerant by self experimentation or by actually receiving a gluten sensitivity or celiac blood test that has positive results. Unfortunately some doctors have antiquated data regarding these diseases and believe that an intestinal biopsy is needed to confirm a diagnosis.
    Such doctors insist that their patients reintroduce gluten into their diet for a minimum of six weeks and then schedule an intestinal endoscopy and biopsy.
    Discussion: It was once thought that a biopsy was the 'gold standard' for celiac diagnosis. We now know that to be untrue. When I say 'we' I am referring to those in the field who research or who stay on the cutting edge of research. Unfortunately there are many doctors who are not in this category and their lack of current knowledge puts their patients at great risk.
    I cannot tell you how many times I have spoken with individuals who have reintroduced gluten into their diets, despite their knowledge of how sick it would make them, only to get extremely ill, sometimes for months. Worse still, some patients initiated an autoimmune disease due to the reintroduction that we couldn't completely reverse.
    I call reintroducing gluten 'Russian roulette'. Perhaps you can now appreciate why.
    One should NEVER EVER reintroduce gluten once they know they are sensitive to it, regardless of any test result. There is no test that is 'worth' risking your health over, especially not for a biopsy that is very poor at identifying the presence of non-classical celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.
    That brings up some new terminology:
    Classic celiac disease describes the disease as it was originally described as primarily digestive in nature, and associated with destruction of the lining of the small intestine. We now know, through research, that classical celiac forms a minority of celiac cases. Once again, these data are not well known in the medical community, which explains why we miss 95% of those who suffer from the disease.
    Gluten sensitivity is an intolerance to gluten that is not associated with the destruction of the lining of the small intestine but it creates inflammation through the immune system and creates many of the same diseases and symptoms associated with celiac disease. Conservative estimates of the incidence of gluten sensitivity put it at 15% of the population, making it much more prevalent than celiac disease. Assuming other factors, an intestinal biopsy would not be positive in an individual with gluten sensitivity.
    3. Individuals who try the gluten-free diet and find it difficult and decide to limit gluten instead of eliminating it, thinking that less gluten is bound to help.
    Discussion: Unfortunately, whether you have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, gluten consumption requires a zero tolerance policy. I like to tell patients that consuming gluten is a qualitative factor not a quantitative one. In other words, ANY gluten is problematic.
    It does make intuitive sense that more of a toxic substance is bound to create greater harm than less, but with gluten intolerance that doesn't happen to be the case. It doesn't require much gluten to begin the cascade of inflammation that can create one of the more than 300 diseases and conditions associated with it.
    4. A person does not exemplify the classic symptoms of celiac disease (see point #2 above for a definition) and therefore gets no cooperation from their doctor for appropriate testing.
    Discussion: This scenario can result in many different repercussions. An individual can strongly suspect gluten intolerance based on observing their body's reactions to it, but due to the absence of classic digestive symptoms, their doctor refuses to test them and, worse yet, persuades them that gluten could not possibly be a problem!
    This one frustrates me because the person knows, without question, that gluten is the culprit but they allow a clinician who is operating from a dated knowledge base, to cause them to doubt themselves, and, as a result, the patient damages their health even further.
    I truly cannot tell you how often I hear such stories. These individuals feel completely adrift and helpless because they literally don't know where to turn for help. I'm glad when they find our clinic and we can validate what they know to be true and really get down to work to improve their health.
    5. There are some individuals who cannot 'feel' the effects of cheating and due to this they continue to cheat and eat gluten.
    Discussion: This is a tough one because it is human nature to avoid things that make us feel badly but it's more difficult if there are no obvious effects.
    Someone who has been diagnosed as gluten intolerant is having a reaction to gluten and it is shortening their lifespan and moving them closer to disease, each and every time they cheat.
    In the past, here at HealthNOW, we have used laboratory testing to 'show' patients that their immune system was registering their cheating and thereby (hopefully) convince them that damage is being caused.
    Fortunately a new lab test by Cyrex Labs is due to be released this summer (2012) that will go a step further. This test will reveal if an autoimmune disease is being created as a result of consuming gluten and what part of the body is being targeted.
    We may not 'feel' diseases in the making, so this test will be a wonderful asset to educating patients about what consequences they may be bringing on themselves as a result of their lax diet.
    6. Some people 'cheat' expecting something dramatic to occur within a few hours and when it doesn't they think they are okay to cheat occasionally.
    Discussion: This really is a point of poor education on the part of the doctor, their patient or both. We put in a lot of time with our patients to ensure that they understand that a reaction to gluten can occur within hours or days of ingesting it. We do our very best to ensure that patients understand that a headache or rash (as an example) that appears two days after a gluten 'cheat' is a reaction to that dietary indiscretion.
    We also strive to ensure that they understand that the damage goes way beyond the symptom that they feel. It goes deeper to the degree that they are likely creating a degenerative or autoimmune disease with their lax diet.
    7. I hear too many stories from people who actually received a positive blood test for celiac disease but who were then told by their doctor that the test was not 'for sure' and instead the doctor decided to concentrate on a different disease the patient had rather than prescribe a strict gluten-free diet.
    Discussion: The above may strike you as a little unbelievable. I only wish it was. I don't know if certain clinicians just don't feel comfortable asking their patients to follow a diet that they might not want to follow, or what exactly the issue is. But the above scenario has come up often.
    To add insult to injury the disease process that the doctor has decided to focus on rather than the celiac disease is often a disease CAUSED by gluten!
    I distinctly remember a young adult woman who was told by her endocrinologist that they were going to focus on her diabetes rather than her celiac disease because it would be 'too much' to address both. There is strong research evidence of the correlation between celiac disease and diabetes, not to mention the fact that untreated celiac disease is known to increase the risk of death from all causes.
    8. Individuals with known gluten intolerance let 'peer pressure' cause them to cheat.
    Discussion: You might think that I'm only talking about children here but I'm not. As a matter a fact I often find my younger patients to be quite disciplined. Adults, however, do at times suffer from 'not wanting to be different' or 'not wanting to be rude' and they solve their dilemma by cheating.
    My advice here is to explain to the person urging you to cheat that gluten is like rat poison to you. This works well for those people who say, "Come on, a little won't kill you…". Ask the person how they would feel if you offered them 'just a little' rat poison. Would they take it? After all, it's just a little.
    You get my point. I've been doing this for more than twenty years and patients report that this example does seem to communicate well to others. Feel free to utilize whatever talking points work best for you, but PLEASE, don't let peer pressure damage your good health.
    9. Some people have close relatives they know to have celiac disease or other autoimmune diseases and they don't get tested for gluten intolerance because they're 'afraid to find out' or they don't feel too badly or they just don't know about the strong correlation between gluten intolerance and autoimmune disease.
    Discussion: There's a saying that goes, "What you don't know can't hurt you." Unfortunately that's not true for people with gluten intolerance. Deciding not to get tested doesn't diminish or slow down gluten's degenerative effects.
    Gluten isn't something you can hide from. If gluten intolerance or autoimmune diseases are a part of your family tree I would strongly suggest that you get tested for both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity and if negative, confirm the accuracy or inaccuracy of that test result with a thirty day gluten elimination diet.
    It is that important that you know for sure that you are not part of the genetic predisposition that is present in your family tree.
    10. Patients eliminate gluten due to a diagnosis of gluten intolerance but after initially feeling much better, they begin to feel poorly again and don't know what to do to correct the problem.
    Discussion: This may be the last point on our list but it certainly is not the least important. In fact, when I'm talking with individuals who know they have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, this is one of the most common complaints I hear.
    Unfortunately the medical profession's sole treatment strategy for celiac disease is gluten avoidance, period. I wish that was enough, but for the vast majority of people it isn't.
    The secondary effects created by gluten intolerance do not remedy themselves when gluten is removed from the diet. Gluten has a devastating effect on the body's immune system and in order to normalize that immune system there are several factors that must be addressed, the most common of which follow:
    a. The presence of pathogenic (disease-causing) organisms. These can be bacteria, parasites, amoeba, etc., but they must be discovered and treated in order to remove excess stress from the immune system and to allow vital healing of the small intestine.
    b. An imbalance of the good bacteria or probiotic population in the small intestine. These probiotics (or microbiome) account for the strength of the immune system and supporting their restoration to a healthy, robust level is critical for the immune system as well as the prevention of disease.
    c. Cross-reactive foods can be part of the patient's diet and these foods can mimic the effects of gluten thereby preventing healing and causing gluten-related symptoms despite a gluten-free diet. These foods are often temporary irritants while the body is healing but we have found some patients who require permanent elimination of some of these foods.
    d. Hormonal imbalance created by the stress on the body that gluten creates is something that must be normalized through natural means in order to regain mental balance, increased energy levels and normalized weight, just to name a few.
    e. Toxic elements including heavy metals and poor detoxification abilities of the body are also a potential hurdle that needs to be overcome when restoring health to someone who is gluten intolerant.
    f. Enzyme and vitamin deficiencies should be evaluated and treated as they are discovered.
    Basically, the stress on the system that gluten has created must be diagnosed and remedied in order for the individual to regain optimal health.
    Addressing these secondary effects is not complicated. It takes the knowledge of what they are, how to correctly test for them and how to effectively treat them, but this is not difficult. The lack of widespread awareness of these factors results in many individuals continuing to suffer despite maintaining their gluten-free lifestyle.
    This just isn't fair and it's something I am passionate about remedying. I hope you found this helpful for yourself, a family member or a close friend. Feel free to contact me if you need assistance. I'm here to help and welcome you to give me a call for a free health analysis. Call 408-733-0400.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Did You Miss the Gluten-Free Fireworks This Past Fourth of July?
    Celiac.com 08/14/2018 - Occasionally, Celiac.com learns of an amusing gluten-free story after the fact. Such is the case of the “Gluten-Free Fireworks.” 
    We recently learned about a funny little event that happened leading up to Fourth of July celebrations in the town of Springdale in Northwest Arkansas. It seems that a sign advertising "Gluten Free Fireworks" popped up near a fireworks stand on interstate 49 in Springdale. 
    In case you missed the recent dose of Fourth of July humor, in an effort to attract customers and provide a bit of holiday levity, Pinnacle Fireworks put up a sign advertising "gluten-free fireworks.” 
    The small company is owned by Adam Keeley and his father. "A lot of the people that come in want to crack a joke right along with you," Keeley said. "Every now and then, you will get someone that comes in and says so fireworks are supposed to be gluten-free right? Have I been buying fireworks that have gluten? So then I say no, no they are gluten-free. It's just a little fun."
    Keeley said that their stand saw a steady flow of customers in the week leading up to the Fourth. In addition to selling “gluten-free” fireworks, each fireworks package sold by Pinnacle features a QR code. The code can be scanned with a smartphone. The link leads to a video showing what the fireworks look like.
    We at Celiac.com hope you and your family had a safe, enjoyable, and, yes, gluten-free Fourth of July. Stay tuned for more on gluten-free fireworks and other zany, tongue-in-cheek stories.
    Read more at kark.com
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Stress-Related Disorders Associated with Higher Risk for Autoimmune Disease
    Celiac.com 08/13/2018 - It’s not uncommon for people to have psychiatric reactions to stressful life events, and these reactions may trigger some immune dysfunction. Researchers don’t yet know whether such reactions increase overall risk of autoimmune disease.
    Are psychiatric reactions induced by trauma or other life stressors associated with subsequent risk of autoimmune disease? Are stress-related disorders significantly associated with risk of subsequent autoimmune disease?
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether there is an association between stress-related disorders and subsequent autoimmune disease. The research team included Huan Song, MD, PhD; Fang Fang, MD, PhD; Gunnar Tomasson, MD, PhD; Filip K. Arnberg, PhD; David Mataix-Cols, PhD; Lorena Fernández de la Cruz, PhD; Catarina Almqvist, MD, PhD; Katja Fall, MD, PhD; Unnur A. Valdimarsdóttir, PhD.
    They are variously affiliated with the Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Centre for Rheumatology Research, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; the Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; the Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; the Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; the Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; and the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
    The team conducted a Swedish register-based retrospective cohort study that included 106, 464 patients with stress-related disorders, 1,064 ,640 matched unexposed individuals, and 126 ,652 full siblings to determine whether a clinical diagnosis of stress-related disorders was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease.
    The team identified stress-related disorder and autoimmune diseases using the National Patient Register. They used Cox model to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs of 41 autoimmune diseases beyond 1 year after the diagnosis of stress-related disorders, controlling for multiple risk factors.
    The data showed that being diagnosed with a stress-related disorder, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, acute stress reaction, adjustment disorder, and other stress reactions, was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease, compared with matched unexposed individuals. The team is calling for further studies to better understand the associations and the underlying factors.
    Source:
    JAMA. 2018;319(23):2388-2400. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.7028  

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-Free Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Breasts
    Celiac.com 08/11/2018 - Need a quick, easy, reliable gluten-free dish that will satisfy everyone and leave the cook with plenty of time to relax? This recipe is sure to do the trick. Best of all, it's super easy. Just grab some chicken breasts, season them, hit them with a sprig of rosemary, wrap some bacon around them, and chuck them on the grill and call it dinner. Okay, you can add some rice and veggies.
    Ingredients:
    4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves 4 thick slices bacon 4 teaspoons garlic powder 4 small sprigs fresh rosemary salt and pepper to taste Directions:
    Heat an outdoor grill to medium-high heat, and lightly oil the grate.
    Sprinkle 1 teaspoon garlic powder on a chicken breast and season with salt and pepper. 
    Place a rosemary sprig on each chicken breast. 
    Wrap the bacon around the chicken and the rosemary. 
    Hold bacon in place with a toothpick or extra rosemary stem.
    Cook the chicken breasts until no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, about 8 minutes per side. 
    Keep an eye out for any grill flare ups from the bacon grease. 
    Remove the toothpicks and serve with steamed rice and your favorite vegetables for a winning meal.

    Connie Sarros
    Five-Minute Healthy Breakfasts
    Celiac.com 08/10/2018 - You’ve heard for years that it’s wise to start your day with a healthy breakfast.  Eating food first thing in the morning gets your metabolism revved so you have energy throughout the day.  There’s also the issue of incorporating healthy foods into your first meal of the day.  Ideally, every meal should include fiber and foods from a variety of food groups.  But the reality is that most people don’t have time in the morning to create an involved meal.  You’re busy getting ready for work, packing the kids’ lunches and trying to get everyone out of the door on time.  
    Don’t fret.  The task of preparing a healthy breakfast just got easier.  You can make 5-minute breakfasts and, with a little bit of planning, you can sneak fiber into those meals without spending a lot of extra time with preparation.  An ideal breakfast will include whole grains (from gluten-free cereals, breads, muffins, or uncontaminated oats), a low-fat dairy item (1% milk, low-fat yogurt, or low-fat cheese), and a source of protein (such as peanut butter or eggs).  Adding fruit is a plus.  
    If you can tolerate uncontaminated oats, make a bowl of oatmeal and add a little extra fiber by stirring in chopped walnuts and dried cranberries.  If you like scrambled eggs, toss some fresh spinach (sliced into thin strips), 1 chopped canned artichoke heart, two tablespoons crumbled feta cheese, and a dash of Italian seasoning to the egg as it cooks.  
    If you have time on weekends to make healthy gluten-free pancakes (which  means that you added perhaps flax seed meal or shredded apples or something that qualifies as fiber to the batter), then freeze the pancakes between sheets of wax paper, place them in a freezer bag, and freeze so they’ll be handy on busy weekday mornings.  If you don’t have time to make them prior to need, you can always use commercial frozen gluten-free pancakes.  In a bowl, mix together a few raisins, half of a chopped pear or apple, a few dashes of cinnamon and a couple of tablespoons of chopped walnuts.  Spoon this mixture down the centers of two toasted (or microwaved) pancakes, drizzle each with 1 teaspoon of pancake or maple syrup, then fold in the sides of the pancakes to make two breakfast sandwiches.
    Brown rice is brown because the bran layer is still on the rice, and the bran layer is the part that’s so high in fiber.  White rice is much lower in fiber and has less nutritional value.  Brown rice isn’t just for dinner anymore.  It offers a nice breakfast alternative from traditional hot cereals.  The next time you make brown rice for dinner, make a little extra and save some for breakfast the next morning.  In the A.M., mix the rice (about 1 cup) with a few chopped pecans, a few raisins, 1/2 cup milk, 3 tablespoons pancake syrup, a dash each of vanilla and cinnamon, then microwave the mixture for 1 minute, stirring once after 30 seconds.  Let it sit for 30 seconds to thicken before eating.  Or stir together 1 cup cooked brown rice, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 navel orange diced, some chopped dates, dried cranberries, and shredded coconut; heat this in the microwave and then top it off with 1/2 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt.
    Just a note about using the microwave—it’s not an exact science.  Different ovens have different power levels so what cooks in 30 seconds in one person’s microwave may take 45 seconds in someone else’s unit.  Unless you want the food to splatter all over the sides of the oven, you’ll need to cover any liquids or soft foods with waxed paper.  
    There will be days when you don’t have time to sit down at the table and enjoy a leisurely breakfast.  On these days, make a “grab-and-go” breakfast that you can take with you.  Gluten-free wraps keep for several weeks in the refrigerator and they make great fill-and-go containers on busy mornings.  Spread a wrap with peanut butter, sprinkle some fortified gluten-free dry cereal on top, then drizzle with a teaspoon of pancake syrup; roll up the wrap and you have the perfect dashboard dining breakfast to eat on the way to work.  Or scramble an egg, spoon it down the center of the wrap, and then top it off with a little salsa and pepper-jack cheese before rolling it up. If you only have three minutes before you have to leave the house, spoon some low-fat cottage cheese into a cup, stir in a dash of cinnamon, top with a little low-fat gluten-free granola or fortified dry gluten-free cereal, sprinkle berries or chopped peaches over the top, grab a spoon, and you’re ready to go!
    Smoothies can be made in literally one minute.  Toss some frozen raspberries into a blender, add a 12-ounce container of low-fat lemon yogurt, a little milk, and two teaspoons of vanilla; blend, then pour the mixture into a large plastic cup.
    If you oversleep, don’t panic.  Have some back-up foods on hand that you can grab and eat en route to work, like a gluten-free protein bar and a banana, or a bag of nuts and dried fruit, or flax seed crackers with a handful of cheese cubes, or toss some gluten-free granola over a container of yogurt and grab a spoon to take along.
    All of the above suggestions can be made in five minutes or less.  Take the time to start your day off with a healthy breakfast—you deserve to do that for yourself and for your family.
    Apple English Muffins by Connie Sarros
    This recipe is from my newly-released book Student’s Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies.  While this isn’t a gluten-free cookbook, most of the recipes are naturally gluten-free or can very easily be converted to gluten-free.  
    Preparation time:  4 minutes.  Cooking time:  30 seconds.  Yield:  1 serving
    Ingredients:
    1 tablespoon peanut butter  1 gluten-free English muffin, toasted  1/8 large apple, peeled, cored and sliced thin ½ teaspoon butter  ¾ teaspoon brown sugar 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon Directions:
    Spread peanut butter on one toasted English muffin half.  Lay the apple slices on top. In a small microwave safe bowl, heat the butter in the microwave on high for 15 seconds.  Stir in the brown sugar and cinnamon then nuke for another 15 seconds.  Stir until smooth.  (If necessary, pop it back into the microwave until the brown sugar melts).   Drizzle the cinnamon mixture over the apple slices then place the second half of the English muffin on top. Note:  If you’re out of apples, use a pear, ripe peach or nectarine, mango, or even a banana.

    Jefferson Adams
    Can a New Gluten-Free Cricket-Flour Cookbook Turn Americans on to Eating Bugs?
    Celiac.com 08/09/2018 - Whatever one might say about crawfish, shrimp and crustaceans in general, Americans don’t typically eat bugs. Can a former Ralph Lauren marketing executive turn the world on to flour made from crickets?
    Over the last few years, Americans have been presented with a buffet of alternative proteins and meals. Robyn Shapiro’s company, Seek, has created all-purpose, gluten-free, and Paleo blended flours, which can be used cup for cup in any recipe calling for flour. 
    The company, which makes pure cricket powder for smoothies, ice creams, and other liquid-based foods, is now selling cinnamon-almond crunch cricket protein and snack bites. To get the public interested in its cricket protein and cricket flour products, Shapiro has collaborated with famous chefs to create recipes for The Cricket Cookbook. 
    The book’s cast includes La Newyorkina chef Fany Gerson, a Mexico City native known for her cricket sundaes; noted Sioux chef and cookbook author Sean Sherman; and former Noma pastry chef Ghetto Gastro member, Malcolm Livingston, among others.
    Other companies have sought to promote the benefits of insect protein, including Chapul, which makes cricket protein bars and powders, and Exo, which makes dairy- and gluten-free cricket protein bars in flavors like cocoa nut and banana bread. These companies, along with others in the business tend to aim their products at Paleo dieters by promising more protein and no dairy.
    Seek’s chef-focused approach makes it unique. By pairing with noted chefs who already use bugs and bug protein in their cooking, Shapiro is looking to make the public more comfortable and confident in using bugs to cook and bake. So far, the response has been slow, but steady. Seek has already raised nearly $13,000 from 28 backers, well on its way toward its $25,000 goal. 
    Seek’s cricket flours and other products will initially only be available via Kickstarter. If that goes well, the products will be sold on Seek’s website. Early backers will get a discount and a chance for a signed copy of the book. Seek hopes to debut their products nationwide starting in the fall. 
    Could gluten-free cricket flour and the new cookbook be the next big gluten-free Christmas gift? Stay tuned for more on this and other gluten-free stories.
    Source:
    grubstreet.com