Jump to content



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Great News for Gluten-free Gin, Whiskey and Vodka Lovers

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.
    Great News for Gluten-free Gin, Whiskey and Vodka Lovers - Photo: CC--Steve Corey
    Caption: Photo: CC--Steve Corey

    Celiac.com 02/20/2015 - Most all gins and whiskeys, and many vodkas, are distilled from grain. While many people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance can drink them with no adverse effects, many others cannot.

    These brands of gin, whiskey and vodka are made with gluten-free ingredients, and safe for people with celiac disease and wheat sensitivity.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    So anyone with celiac disease who has been missing their gin or whiskey can now happily indulge. Cheers!

    GLUTEN-FREE GIN

    • Cold River Gin is distilled from potatoes. The company’s website says that, like their world-famous vodkas, their gluten-free gin is made with whole Maine potatoes and the pure water of Maine's Cold River.
    • Cold River uses a recipe that “dates back to the early days of British gin,” and contains their own “secret blend of seven traditional botanicals that are steeped for the perfect amount of time to infuse the essential flavors.”

    GLUTEN-FREE WHISKEY

    • Queen Jennie Whiskey, by Old Sugar Distillery is made entirely from sorghum. The idea of a whiskey made from gluten-free grains is sure to excite anyone with celiac disease who longs for a wee dram.
    • The company’s web page says that Queen Jennie is made with 100% Wisconsin Sorghum, and is “Less sour than a bourbon and less harsh than a rye.”

    GLUTEN-FREE VODKA

    • Corn Vodka—Deep Eddy, Nikolai, Rain, Tito’s, UV
    • Potato Vodka—Boyd & Blair, Cirrus, Chase, Chopin, Cold River Vodka, Cracovia, Grand Teton, Karlsson’s, Luksusowa, Monopolowa, Schramm Organic, Zodiac
    • Monopolowa is one of my favorites, and is usually available at Trader Joe’s.
    • Cold River gluten-free vodka is triple-distilled in a copper pot still, from Maine potatoes and water from Maine's Cold River.
    • Tito’s award winning vodka is six times distilled from corn in an old-fashioned pot still, just like fine single malt scotches and high-end French cognacs. Tito’s is certified Gluten-free.

    Edited by Jefferson Adams



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    It's fine that these brands are available to those who want to buy them, but there is no brand of distilled spirit of any kind that has anything other that the most minute amount of gluten in it. To say otherwise is to suppose that the vapor generated during distillation contains significant amounts of proteins. That's pure voodoo.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Gin and vodka have always been gluten free. Gin is made from juniper berries and vodka from potatoes . However it is good news about the Scotch--the bad news is it would be far too expensive to buy in Australia.

    Gin is not traditionally distilled from juniper berries. It is traditionally flavored with juniper berries. Distilled gin is made from any neutral spirit of agricultural origin, which often includes barley and other grains, then flavored with botanicals.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    It's fine that these brands are available to those who want to buy them, but there is no brand of distilled spirit of any kind that has anything other that the most minute amount of gluten in it. To say otherwise is to suppose that the vapor generated during distillation contains significant amounts of proteins. That's pure voodoo.

    You are correct that all distilled alcoholic beverages are free of gluten unless it is added after distillation. However, some folks feel better knowing that there is no gluten anywhere in the production process, and that the products are labeled as "gluten-free."

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    @R.Sosinski. You are correct. All distilled spirits are gluten-free. That is a fact that is simply beyond dispute. What, if you buy some kind of rum or vodka that has been altered with some flavoring agent, there is at least the theoretical possibility that the manufacturer cluelessly introduced some kind of gluten-containing ingredient. Other than that, if you drank it and got sick, that's what's known as a hangover. I do take gluten-free foods seriously, have had 3-4 years when I was extremely gluten-sensitive (NOT self-diagnosed, by the way) with symptoms I'll politely not describe here. I just wish that spirits producers did not put "Gluten Free" on their labels. It's exploitative. They are playing those with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity for suckers, and you are utterly gullible if you take their "we're the safe choice" schtick seriously.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    @R.Sosinski. You are correct. All distilled spirits are gluten-free. That is a fact that is simply beyond dispute. What, if you buy some kind of rum or vodka that has been altered with some flavoring agent, there is at least the theoretical possibility that the manufacturer cluelessly introduced some kind of gluten-containing ingredient. Other than that, if you drank it and got sick, that's what's known as a hangover. I do take gluten-free foods seriously, have had 3-4 years when I was extremely gluten-sensitive (NOT self-diagnosed, by the way) with symptoms I'll politely not describe here. I just wish that spirits producers did not put "Gluten Free" on their labels. It's exploitative. They are playing those with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity for suckers, and you are utterly gullible if you take their "we're the safe choice" schtick seriously.

    saying all distilled spirits are gluten free is like saying all medicine is gluten free. I , myself do not think that my reaction to drinking the spirit was a hang over. Many spirits have added ingredients added after the distilling process including the addition of extra wheat, barley, or malt, hence the double malt process of some whiskeys. As I have been an avid consumer of distilled spirits for 30+ years, and diagnosed celiac sprue for 10 years. As always read labels , watch for cross contamination, the labeling is not for suckers its to help determine whether there is gluten containing ingredients during the making & bottling process , and in that aspect the glue that holds the labeling on to the bottle contains gluten. this is life for me not a fad diet what irritates me is the government saying gluten free is 20 ppm or less. I happen to react to less than 5 ppm.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    The April, 1999 Tufts University Medical Letter stated that according to the Food Allergy Network, the following eight foods cause 90 percent of all allergic reactions:
    Peanuts Tree nuts (such as almonds, cashews, pecans, and walnuts) Fish Shellfish Eggs Milk Soy Wheat.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/23/2010 - People following a gluten-free diet due to celiac-disease or other conditions, who are facing a hospital stay, might want to cheek with their hospital dietitian and staff to make sure that the 'gluten-free' meal they receive is, in fact, gluten-free.
    That's because, even hospitals can make mistakes. Let's face it, if they can occasionally amputate the wrong limb, remove the wrong organ, or give the wrong drugs, they can accidentally slip an item containing gluten into a gluten-free meal.
    That's exactly what happened to Don MacMillan, a 68-year old Canadian man whose recovery from gall-bladder surgery was marked by a hospital mix-up that sent him a standard meal instead of the gluten-free meal he required and requested. 
    Still weak, three days after surgery, and hungry from three days of intravenous and liquid nutrition, MacMillan was looking forward to eating his first solid food. Still, he didn’t want to take any chances.
    He was suspicious of the hospital's lunch of chicken à la king and a cookie. Fortunately for MacMillan, he was both suspicious and vocal.
    ‘You sure what I’m being fed is gluten free?’ he asked the assistant.
    She answered that it was, but MacMillan asked her to please double-check. After checking in with the kitchen, she admitted that they had made an error: the meal was not, in fact, gluten-free.
    “She told me it was OK, but I just didn’t trust her ... so I asked her to verify," MacMillan added.
    Quintin Wight, spokesman for the Ottawa chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association, said what happened to MacMillan occurs more frequently in hospitals and nursing homes than is reported.
    “I sympathize with him greatly because this is a situation that we’ve heard about on and off over many years,” said Wight.
    “I’m not sure how it arises in the hospitals because the dietitians certainly know what gluten-free food is, but it doesn’t seem to get to the kitchen staff. These are organizations that should know better," he added.
    No one needs extra dietary or immune challenges when recovering from surgery. People who plan a hospital stay, and who require and request a gluten-free meal due to celiac disease or other conditions, can do themselves a big favor by taking steps to confirm the gluten-free status before eating the meal provided.
    Rule of thumb: Just because the meal is labelled gluten-free, doesn't mean it is gluten-free. When it comes to special meals in the hospital, trust, but verify.
    Source:
    Ottawa Citizen


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/24/2012 - The old, cafeteria-style dining campus hall is fast becoming a thing of the past.
    Today’s students are bringing their more sophisticated palates and health-related concerns to campuses and schools are stepping up to accommodate them.
    Driven by these new consumer demands, and more creative management, more and more campus dining halls are beginning to resemble restaurants, featuring selections that reflect world cuisine and emerging food trends.
    Students are "becoming more sophisticated customers," says Joe Wojtowicz, general manager of Sodexo, Inc.'s Crossroads dining room at Concordia University Chicago in River Forest.
    These days, it's common for students to press staff about food options, especially questions about celiac disease, gluten-intolerance, food allergies and vegetarian preferences.
    More and more are moving to accommodate dietary restrictions like vegetarian, Kosher or halal, or putting gluten-free or lactose-free choices on their menus.
    From higher quality ingredients, such as free-range eggs, humanely raised meats, and fresh, locally produced produce, dining halls are increasingly offering more exotic options like Cuban, Chinese, or Thai dishes.
    “It’s not just spaghetti for Italian and tacos for Mexican,” said Rachel Warner, marketing director for the National Association of College and University Food Services.
    Many colleges are hiring restaurant chefs, dieticians and nutritionists to oversee the dining hall operations and some are even customizing meals to meet individual student needs or preferences.
    “I think that the shift in dining is really driven by the consumers. They come in with higher expectations and are increasingly savvy about the world around them and the different kinds of food,” says Warner.
    More and more, this higher level of student awareness and expectation is driving camp offerings.
    At DePaul University, students were asked to vote on whether a particular brand of hummus was suitable at their school.
    At Northwestern University, students recently enjoyed a “cruise night” offering food of the tropics. At Loyola University Chicago, students drink hormone-free milk. Students at Northewestern University can choose from numerous kosher options.
    One university in Texas offers a vegan dining hall and a Colorado school has a station dedicated to Persian cuisine.
    According to Warner, “Students are coming in and they do want to have a little bit more say and more options.”
    These dining hall improvements are yielding benefits not just to students, but to their communities.
    In 2011, Wheaton College was ranked by the Princeton Review as having the best campus food in America. The dining services are run by Bon Appetit management company.
    Raul Delgado, general manager of Wheaton College’s dining services, says “When you look at this, the farthest thing from your mind is a cafeteria…This is a restaurant. And like any restaurant, it’s open to the general public.
    Esther Howerzyl, 68, who biked to Wheaton from St. Charles with a group of friends, says the food is "very organic health food and I like all the seeds, the variety of seeds.”
    Do you have experience with these evolving campus dining trends, especially as they relate to gluten-free options? If so, please comment below.
    Also read a related article: Schools Offering Better Food Options for Students with Celiac Disease, Other Food Concerns.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/22/2012 - More and more, manufacturers are putting gluten-free labels on nonfood items such as vitamins and creams, lotions and other products absorbed by the skin.
    Recently, there's been a an increase of nearly 50% in body care products labeled "gluten-free" and certified as gluten-free, according to Cynthia Kupper, executive director of the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America.
    Kupper was a featured speaker at “The Gluten Free Movement Within Specialty Foods" webinar hosted by The National Association of Specialty Food Trade.
    Many people who are gluten-sensitive suffer adverse reactions when using products that contain wheat and gluten. “If I were to wash my hands in wheat germ oil, they’d turn red and get itchy and blotchy,” says C.A. Diltz, who heads up gluten-free programs at Dorothy Lane Market here and is gluten sensitive herself.
    Diltz likes gluten-free health and beauty brand Keys and its all-natural moisturizer, shampoo and antibiotic hand soap to avoid skin irritation and problems related to accidental ingestion.
    This is a welcome development for many people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance, as symptoms of a gluten reaction often manifest in the skin, and many people who avoid gluten are sensitive to gluten in products that are applied to the skin.
    Prescription medication can also be problematic, since fillers may contain wheat and/or gluten. To that end, the FDA has launched an assessment of drugs and drug manufacturers to determine which drugs contain gluten, and whether many of these can be reformulated to be gluten-free.
    Next month, a compounding pharmacist from Clark’s pharmacy, Huber Heights, Ohio, will address the issue at DLM’s Gluten-Free Food Lover’s Club support group meeting.
    At that same meeting, pharmacist Robyn Crow will help answer the question: “Are Allergen-Free Compounded Prescriptions Best For You?”
    Source:
    http://supermarketnews.com/nonfood/more-nonfoods-labeled-gluten-free


  • Popular Now

×
×
  • Create New...