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    Scott Adams

    Hamentashen (Gluten-Free)

    Scott Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    This recipe comes to us from "debmidge" in the Gluten-Free Forum.

    Ingredients:
    1 stick butter or margerine
    1 cup sugar
    1 egg
    2 tablespoons orange juice (or lemon juice)
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ¾ teaspoon xanthan gum
    ¾ cup corn starch *
    ½ cup white rice flour *
    ½ cup brown rice flour *
    ½ cup potato starch *
    ¼ cup tapioca flour *

    *or use 2 ½ cups gluten-free flour of your choice

    Filling: Apricot, prune, or strawberry preserves or jam mini chocolate chips, M&Ms, etc.

    Directions:

    1. In mixer, cream butter and sugar.
    2. Add egg.
    3. Add orange juice and vanilla.
    4. In separate bowl, combine flour, baking powder and xanthan.
    5. Add flour slowly to mixture.
    6. Refrigerate dough for several hours ( I do overnight).
    7. Roll out dough onto lightly gluten-free floured surface. Roll to 1/8 to ¼ inch thickness.
    8. Cut into circles with 2 ½ inch wide glass.
    9. Fill each circle with about ½ teaspoonful of filling of your choice.
    10. Fold up 3 sides of circle and pinch edges firmly to form triangle with opening at center to let filling peek through.
    11. Bakeat 375F degrees on parchment covered cookie sheet for about 15 minutes,or until lightly browned. Let cool before transferring to plate.
    This recipe makes about 26 gluten-free Hamantaschen cookies, and it can be doubled.

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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