Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams

    Has Barilla Pasta Been Ripping Off Customers?

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Pasta giant Barilla sued for "substantially" underfilling boxes of some pastas.


    Has Barilla Pasta Been Ripping Off Customers? Photo: CC--Creative Tools
    Caption: Has Barilla Pasta Been Ripping Off Customers? Photo: CC--Creative Tools

    Celiac.com 10/06/2016 - If you've bought pasta in a box, or if you've even strolled your boxed pasta aisle at the supermarket, you've likely come across Barilla, and their famous blue box. Well, it turns out that the world's largest pasta-maker might have been ripping off customers by routinely under filling their boxes. In fact, Barilla is being sued for 'substantially' under-filling boxes and, as a result, cheating customers out of as much as a quarter of their noodles.

    Plaintiffs Alessandro Berni, Domenico Salvata, Mossimo Simioli, and Giuseppe Santochirico, have filed a class-action lawsuit alleging that Barilla deceptively packages certain pastas in order to deceive consumers. They claim extra-protein, whole-grain, and gluten-free pastas are placed in the standard-size boxes used for plain old penne or farfalle — only these specialty boxes are "substantially under-filled."



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    According to the plaintiffs' math, a box of Protein Plus contains 9.4 percent less pasta, the whole-grain variety is under-filled by 17.4 percent, and the gluten-free shorts buyers a full 25 percent. At the heart of the dispute is a practice commonly known as "slack-fill," the practice of leaving empty space at the top of packaged goods.

    Now, many consumers complaint about the practice, but if the contents are measured by weight, and the weight on the label matches the weight of the contents in the box, then there's no problem with slack-filling the package. Often it's done to prevent breakage. However, the plaintiffs argue that Barilla manipulated consumer familiarity with the size and look of the box, familiarity built by decades of marketing, to mislead consumers into thinking they were receiving the same quantity of pasta, even though that quantity, sold in that same familiar blue box, was up to 25% less than usual.

    The plaintiffs admit that the boxes do include a vague reference to a "new reduced net weight," but it was placed so that most customers would never notice it. Customers were otherwise uninformed that any change has been made to the amount of pasts in the box.

    Previously, Barilla has found themselves in hot water for funding a health study that "found" people didn't get fat eating pasta, which might have proven true had the study relied on under-filled boxes of Barilla. Oh, and then there was that time Barilla publicly suggested that people who are gay should "eat pasta from another manufacturer."

    So, will Barilla be forced to change its ways? Stay tuned to learn how this and related cases resolve.

    Read more at: Grubstreet.com

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 02/27/2006 - Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) applauds McDonald’s for providing proof that their French fries are safe for persons with celiac disease and gluten intolerances, states Cynthia Kupper, RD, Executive Director of GIG. Kupper, who has worked with large corporate chain restaurants for many years to provide gluten-free menu options, states McDonald’s took the best action possible by having the fries tested by one of the leading independent laboratories in food allergens. McDonald’s has provided the reassurance those persons with celiac disease need, to feel confident they can eat the fries without getting sick. Outback Steak House...

    Dyani Barber
    Celiac.com 04/12/2011 - Paul Seelig was found guilty today of 23 counts of obtaining property by false pretense after a two-week trial in Durham, NC. The jury found that he illegally represented baked goods as gluten-free, but they actually contained gluten. Mr. Seelig received an 11 year prison sentence for his crimes, which included the sickening of more than two dozen customers, one of whom had a premature delivery that was possibly caused by her involuntary gluten consumption.
    Seelig's company, Great Specialty Products, purchased regular gluten-containing items from companies in New Jersey such as Costco, and then repackaged them in his home kitchen...

    Scott Adams
    I have a big issue with what I believe to be a misleading headline in a recent joint press release by Domino's Pizza and the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA)...here is the headline:
    "Domino’s Pizza Becomes First National Pizza Delivery Chain to Offer Gluten Free Crust"
    When you read the release further, starting at the 5th paragraph, which many people will never get to, it says:
    "While Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is appropriate for those with mild gluten sensitivity, Domino’s and the NFCA do not recommend it for those with celiac disease. Domino’s and the NFCA found that while the crust is certified as gluten free, c...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/20/2014 - There's a new study confirming the high price of gluten-free foods that is making waves beyond the shores of the UK, where it was conducted.
    The study, by the food info app canieatit.co.uk, found that about 12 million consumers in Britain bought gluten-free products in the past year, a rise of 120 per cent in just five years.
    The study also found that people who cut gluten from their diet pay double or triple for gluten-free versions of ordinary food.
    Source:
    Times