Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    Have Wheat and Gluten Changed Over Time?

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      An industry-driven study looks to find out if wheat has changed over time.


    Photo: CC--Fimb
    Caption: Photo: CC--Fimb

    Celiac.com 02/24/2017 - Have wheat and gluten changed over time? Is the wheat we consume today substantially different to the wheat we ate fifty or one-hundred years ago? These are interesting questions that have invited a good deal of speculation, but so far, at least, no good answers.

    Dr. Chris Miller, a former faculty member at Kansas State University in Grain Science and Industry, now the director of wheat quality research at Heartland Plant Innovations, is working on a project that could allow people with celiac disease to safely consume wheat. As part of that project, Dr. Miller is studying different wheat varieties from the Kansas State University breeding program.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    So far, he has examined 50 Hard Red Winter wheat lines, which include current commercial varieties, older varieties once common, but rarely planted today, and wild relatives of wheat.

    "With these different varieties we can get a broad understanding of how genetics change over time, or if they have changed through our breeding selection," Miller says.

    Miller and his colleagues started by characterizing the varieties' traits from the field all the way through their protein characterization, their genetic makeup (which involves the plants' genotypes), end-product testing (which examines the plants' milling and baking qualities), and health and nutrition attributes.

    Eventually, they hope to have good data on all of the wheat varieties in the study. This is exploratory research, says Aaron Harries, Vice President of Research and Operations at Kansas Wheat, "We're not sure what we are going to find."

    They hope their preliminary research data will help them toward their main goal of helping people with celiac disease be able to consume wheat products without any digestion problems.

    "This is a study that's focused for the good of all human health. We're doing research here that they aren't doing anywhere else," Jordan Hildebrand, program assistant at Kansas Wheat, said. "The fact that Kansas wheat farmers took the initiative to fund the research showed their foresight and their desire to deliver a wholesome product for everyone who wants to have their bread and eat it too."

    Stay tuned for developments on this and related stories.

    Source:

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    It is always wonderful news to me when I read articles on wheat gluten stating that research continues on behalf of all of us who suffer in multiple ways due to this gluten. A deep and sincere thank you to all the truly concerned scientist who are working on this matter and thank you again to the farmers who have donated their finances to this cause. Perhaps a fund should be set up for all concerned people on this matter to donate toward this cause.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Join eNewsletter

    Good but brief article. I'm a crop scientist and ecologist with celiac. I still drool a little at the smell of good Italian sourdough... Yes, they will be finding a difference relative to the time of development of varieties and hybrids, all the way from the old world to current. We'll wait and see. But I've been preaching this for some time now; that the sheer volume production and the genetics its taken to get there and what plant breeders have striven for has exponentially increase the gluten contained in these beautiful small grains.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Join eNewsletter

    I read an article by a chemist who analyzed the a variety of 2009 hybrid wheat and compared it to a 1960's version. The findings: gluten content ration was 17:1. I explain it as follows: A person would have to consume 102 slices of the 1960's bread to receive the gluten equivalent of 6 slices of today's wheat. I no longer wonder why ICD-10 diagnostic codes are updated to reflect both celiac disease and non-celiac sensitivity conditions. I first heard of the term "gluten" in 2009. Now, most everyone in the U.S. has a friend or relative with gluten related disabilities.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Join eNewsletter

    I have been diagnosed with celiac disease and I'm extremely sensitive; the slightest cross contamination will "poison" me for a week or two. HOWEVER, I ate the thin crust pizza in Florence, Italy three days in a row and had no reaction whatsoever (the pizza was worthy, so I went for it). The research team in this article may want to explore the nature of the Florence thin pizza to see if it helps their theory. This was more than 10 years ago, however.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Join eNewsletter



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/11/2014 - There have been claims that certain strains of wheat, especially ancient strains, such as einkorn, do not trigger adverse reactions in people with celiac disease, or that they trigger less severe reactions.
    Until now, researchers haven't been able to say for certain that celiac disease patients react adversely to all varieties of wheat, or whether there may be differences in reactions to certain strains.
    A research team recently evaluated the safety of ancient strains of wheat in celiac disease. The researchers included Tanja Šuligojemailemail, Armando Gregorinidemail, Mariastella Colombaeemail, H. Julia Elliscemail, and ...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/04/2015 - Kansas farmers grow a lot of wheat. People with celiac disease avoid wheat like the plague. Not only are people with celiac disease avoiding wheat, but the vast majority of people who avoid wheat now do so for non-medical reasons.
    With celiac disease rates on the rise, and millions of non-celiacs now avoiding gluten for non-medical reasons, the gluten-free food industry is worth nearly a billion dollars a year in the U.S. alone.
    This reality has wheat farmers and researchers scrambling to develop wheat strains and products that are safe for consumption by people who follow gluten-free diets.
    If the The Kansas...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/22/2015 - Kansas wheat farmers are funding genetic research to figure out exactly why some people struggle to digest wheat, and to try to produce an wheat-friendly alternative.
    The Kansas Wheat Commission has put $200,000 toward the first two years of the project, which intends to identify anything in wheat DNA that can trigger an auto-immune reaction in people with celiac disease.
    Ultimately, the project seeks to promote the development new wheat varieties that might be tolerated by celiac sufferers, and meet other gluten-free needs. This, at a time when the market for gluten-free goods has skyrocketed, driven partly by non-celiac...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/18/2016 - Whole grains, including gluten-free grains, have never been more popular, but as their fortunes grow as a whole, that of wheat is diminishing.
    The whole grains category includes both gluten-free grains, such as quinoa and other ancient grains, and gluten grains, such as barley, rye and triticale, but wheat products have never been less popular, and continue their downward sales slide.
    This year, 1,282 new products have registered for the Whole Grain Stamp so far, a pace set to meet or beat last year's record of 2,122 new products; up from 1,666 in 2014 and 1,622 in 2013, according to Cynthia Harriman, director of food and...