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  • Jefferson Adams

    High Protein Gluten-free Flour from Crickets?

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Photo: Wikimedia Commons
    Caption: Photo: Wikimedia Commons

    Celiac.com 10/21/2014 - Insects offer one of the most concentrated and efficient forms of protein on the planet, and they are a common food in many parts of the world.

    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--ThogueSo, could high-protein flour made out of crickets change the future of gluten-free foods? A San Francisco Bay Area company is looking to make that possibility a reality.



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    The company, Bitty Foods, is making flour from slow-roasted crickets that are then milled and combined with tapioca and cassava to make a high-protein flour that is gluten-free. According to the Bitty Foods website, a single cup of cricket flour contains a whopping 28 grams of protein.

    So can Bitty Foods persuade gluten-free consumers to try their high protein gluten-free flour? Only time will tell. In the mean time, stay tuned for more cricket flour developments.

    What do you think? Would you give it a try? If it worked well for baking, would you use it?

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    Perhaps if the name of the flour weren't called "cricket flour," I might consider it. Sounds creepy though--I gag at the thought of eating the occasional cricket that I catch jumping around my house in the summer. The thought of serving cricket flour to guests is another consideration--when I bake gluten-free, guests will often ask what's in gluten-free flour. I'm not sure how cricket flour would go over, especially with non-celiac consumers!

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    I'm pretty adventurous so long as it is a safe food, but it would be awfully hard to get past the bug eating aspect. Many of the foods we consider acceptable are cultural. There are some who wouldn't bat an eye, but I wouldn't be one of them.

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    Anyone who's tried it - 

    How does it affect the texture of the baked goods?  Does the additional protein bring back any of the chewiness and sturdiness associated with regular bread?

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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