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    Scott Adams

    Higher Rate of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Women with Treated Celiac Disease

    Scott Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 09/29/2003 - The results of a study published in the September edition of American Journal of Gastroenterology indicate that women with treated celiac disease suffer twice as many gastrointestinal symptoms than do their male counterparts, and that men with treated celiac disease suffered no more GI symptoms than did the normal population. More studies need to be done, however, to determine why male celiacs seem to respond better to treatment than females. Some follow-up work has already been done on this topic. -Scott

    Here is the abstract:



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    Am J Gastroenterol. 2003 Sep;98(9):2023-6.

    High rate of gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac patients living on a gluten-free diet: controlled study.

    Midhagen G, Hallert C.

    Department of Internal Medicine, Skovde Hospital, Skovde, Sweden

    The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of GI symptoms in adults with celiac disease (celiac disease) treated with a gluten-free diet for several years. We studied a cohort of adults with celiac disease (n = 51; 59% women) aged 45-64 yr and proved to be in remission after 8-12 yr of treatment. They were examined by the GI Symptom Rating Scale, which comprises five syndromes: indigestion, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and reflux. A general population sample (n = 182; 57% women) of same age served as controls. Subjects with celiac disease reported significantly more GI symptoms than the general population sample, as assessed by the GI Symptom Rating Scale total score (p

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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