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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    How is lactose intolerance related to celiac disease?*

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Lactose intolerance is frequently a side effect of celiac disease. Celiacs who eat gluten become lactose intolerant after the villi and microvilli in their small intestine become damaged, and are no longer capable of catching and breaking down the lactose molecule. The problem usually disappears when celiacs remove gluten from their diet, which allows the damaged villi and microvilli to grow back. Lactose intolerance symptoms can continue for a long time after a celiac has gone on a 100% gluten-free diet. In some cases the villi and microvilli damage can take up to two years to heal completely, but in most cases it takes between six months and a year. Most people who are lactose intolerant can usually eat goat and sheep (feta) cheeses without any problems.


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    How long does it take for gluten symptoms to go away after not consuming it anymore??

     

    I still have symptoms but it could be from the dairy products after reading this... or it could be the gluten symptoms wearing off.

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    Wonder if anyone would have help for us here - my husband was diagnosed w/celiac 2 yrs. ago, and has done wonderful in eliminating gluten from his diet. About 2 weeks ago he began to have some of the same symptoms again - namely dermatitis herpetiformis & hearing loss -- only this time it is more widespread over his body. He is miserable and desperate for relief, which doctors. are working on - but wonder if anyone else has experienced the same relapse after being gluten-free for a couple of years and a complete cessation of symptoms?. Lactose & dairy haven't been a problem.

    Have you seen a dermatologist yet? I had a red raised itchy and hot to the touch rash and after a biopsy was taken it came back as EAC a complication from the Immune system and inflammation. was given Prednisone and was the only thing that brought relief.

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    Here I am 69 years old and diagnosed about a year ago. The terrible gastric distress (the runs, pain, vomiting) from dairy and gluten were mixed together until I learned that I could tolerate neither one, but perhaps dairy in the future. So I stopped both and really felt magically better. Sheep and goat no problem. I would try cow and at first, would run to the bathroom within a half hour! Now, no problem.

     

    But I agree with Sue that my symptoms tend to return when I eat fried food or fats. I never had that problem before OR I feel so good now that I really notice the difference when I feel bad. By the way, to answer Victor, when I ended the gluten, within 2 days, I was pain free and nausea free! Like magic! Thoough I get a little symptomatic when I eat more fat than usual. Probably a lesson here... Fat not so good anyhow...

     

    All comments are very helpful to me. Thanks so much.

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    Since being diagnosed with celiac I can't take vitamin supplement so I opt for B12 shots every month. Works wonders, gives me energy. I've not been sick in the 2.7 years since my diagnosis, I used to get a bad cold every fall/winter. My autoimmune system seems supercharged though I still have flare-ups I'm working on identifying the food that causes it.

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    Wow. I learned so much from this site. Me, Celiac + Lactose Intolerant + Insomnia + Vegetarian. OMG WHAT'S LEFT TO EAT?

    Became "iron toxic" from eating ALL green. Afraid to eat anything. (no processed foods/canned foods/frozen foods). Any advice? Not one of 9 doctors asked me about diet! I must be my own doctor: most do not have a clue to the diet importance.

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    Have you seen a dermatologist yet? I had a red raised itchy and hot to the touch rash and after a biopsy was taken it came back as EAC a complication from the Immune system and inflammation. was given Prednisone and was the only thing that brought relief.

    OMG I had shingles last summer - got Prednisone. Felt energy for the first time in a decade! Shingles gone, mouth sores gone, happy, eat gluten free healthy just fine. Then, NOT ONE DOCTOR WILL GIVE ME PREDNISONE AGAIN? I'm "60"...not the drugie type: just want to have my immune system calm. Considering going to Mexico to get PREDNISONE to feel alive again. Any advice? I am miserable and fatigued 24/7. help.

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    I am 19 and three years ago I was diagnosed celiac, I had severe eczema all over yet the dermatologists took a biopsy and said it was not dermatitis, so they have provided me with cyclosporine its incredible cleared up my eczema straight away now I can eat milk products and fatty products and it doesn't flair up like it used to, however recently been having similar symptoms to that of gluten with cream, Ben and Jerry's ice cream, Thornton's chocolates and double cream but the doctors are reluctant to give me a lactose intolerant test, think they already think I'm using up enough of NHS money what with my gluten free products, it's interesting to have read that the two are interlinked perhaps I'll just stop eating lactose as well or go and get some of those Lactaid tablets!! Thanks for all your help!!

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    Wonder if anyone would have help for us here - my husband was diagnosed w/celiac 2 yrs. ago, and has done wonderful in eliminating gluten from his diet. About 2 weeks ago he began to have some of the same symptoms again - namely dermatitis herpetiformis & hearing loss -- only this time it is more widespread over his body. He is miserable and desperate for relief, which doctors. are working on - but wonder if anyone else has experienced the same relapse after being gluten-free for a couple of years and a complete cessation of symptoms?. Lactose & dairy haven't been a problem.

    I know this reply is a bit late, as I have only just read it. Does your husband eat fresh gluten free bread? Most of the fresh stuff contains codex wheat starch, which some celiacs can't tolerate, it makes them ill.

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    I have celiac disease and one day I ate some ice cream and started itching really badly all over..no rash, just very bad itching. I came to find out it was from celiac, so now no dairy or gluten!

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    My mom, sister, and 2 aunts have celiac disease. I am lactose intolerant but as long as I stay on that diet I do not have any symptoms. Recently I had a positive Lupus test which then came back negative the 2nd time. I asked my doctor to test me for celiac and he did but the blood test came back as I did not have it. I am cold all the time and my family feels these are signs of celiac and that many people get false test results. Has anyone else had this or similar experiences that can offer me some advice? I do not want to be causing hard to my body and have future effects from it, but I also don't want to go on an expensive diet if I don't have to. I am 35 and have been lactose intolerant since I was about 23. Thank you for any insight!

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    My mom, sister, and 2 aunts have celiac disease. I am lactose intolerant but as long as I stay on that diet I do not have any symptoms. Recently I had a positive Lupus test which then came back negative the 2nd time. I asked my doctor to test me for celiac and he did but the blood test came back as I did not have it. I am cold all the time and my family feels these are signs of celiac and that many people get false test results. Has anyone else had this or similar experiences that can offer me some advice? I do not want to be causing hard to my body and have future effects from it, but I also don't want to go on an expensive diet if I don't have to. I am 35 and have been lactose intolerant since I was about 23. Thank you for any insight!

    Stephanie, Try getting your thyroid tested. I have both hpyothyrodism and just recently tested positive for celiac disease. Some of the symptoms are similar like feeling cold and hair loss. It can't hurt to try. I've also had a false positive for lupus as well.

     

    Goodluck. :)

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    My mom, sister, and 2 aunts have celiac disease. I am lactose intolerant but as long as I stay on that diet I do not have any symptoms. Recently I had a positive Lupus test which then came back negative the 2nd time. I asked my doctor to test me for celiac and he did but the blood test came back as I did not have it. I am cold all the time and my family feels these are signs of celiac and that many people get false test results. Has anyone else had this or similar experiences that can offer me some advice? I do not want to be causing hard to my body and have future effects from it, but I also don't want to go on an expensive diet if I don't have to. I am 35 and have been lactose intolerant since I was about 23. Thank you for any insight!

    I also got negative from the blood, and from a biopsy. But I have cut out gluten anyway, and within 24 hours all my symptoms stopped. They have returned again recently (after 2 years gluten-free) and it's only because I eat dairy, so I'm going to cut that out too.

     

    My advice is, you can spend years and years trying to get the diagnosis from the doctors, and if you keep eating gluten, and end up seriously ill in a few years time, what's that to them? You're the only one who will be affected. Act as if you have the diagnosis, and see if you any better. I suffered for 23 years, almost everyday. Just try the diet, if you don't feel any different after 2 months, then stop. you may find that when you stop, your symptoms get worse. then at least you know. It can be expensive, but I don't get any prescriptions, and I manage. It's all about finding what 'normal' foods you can eat.

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    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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