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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    How much gluten is in a normal diet, and how much does it take to cause damage in a celiac?*

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    The average gluten-containing diet contains roughly 10-40 grams of gluten per day. This figure is based on the amounts of gluten in your average slice of whole wheat bread, which contains around 4.8 grams of gluten (10% gluten by weight), and the amount of gluten in a serving of pasta, which is roughly 6.4 grams of gluten (11% gluten by weight). The smallest amount of gluten which has been shown by a biopsy to cause damage to a celiac is 0.1 gram per day (Catassi et al.). This is approximately the amount of gluten contained in 1/48th of a slice of bread! The biopsies in this study showed an increase in intraepithelial lymphocyte count, one of the earliest signs of damage. The challenge was on 10 patients (children) for 28 days each. Four of the patients showed an increase in IgA antigliadin antibodies. The intestinal permeability test remained normal.


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    Just wondering if anyone knows how much gluten I would have to eat for it to show up on a blood test and for how long? I've been gluten-free for a year and I either have a really bad gluten intolerance or celiac but since I did an elimination diet, I don't have an actual diagnosis.

    I believe the protocol is 20 grams for 3 months to do a gluten challenge for DX purposes for celiacs.

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    Look, we are all born with different genes. Some cant handle high fat, some can, some cant handle gluten some can. The same with all types of foods. I had a great grandfather that drank each day and smoked cigarettes, and made it to 85. Wait, that's too young to die!

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    Just so you are aware, the gluten quantity in the study by Catassi et al that you cited is 10 mg (.01 grams) which resulted in a clinical relapse, not .1 grams. I believe the fraction of bread will then be off too. I don't foresee anyone attempting to slice their bread into 48 pieces (or smaller with the new numbers) but just wanted to pass the info along.

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    The destruction gluten causes to the body of some one with celiacs is nasty. So why risk eating any gluten if you can prevent it.

     

    Mine wasn't caught until I was 39 after I was diagnosed with Crohn's ,asthma fibromyalgia weird allergy symptoms but negative allergy test and Even had a bone graft devolve when I was on high doses of calcium. Eventually type 1 diabetes even false symptoms of MS.

    On a gluten free diet every problem but the Crohn's and diabetes and the damage to my spine by the bone graft dissolving has gone away. I love being able to breath! I love wearing jewelry and getting bouquets of roses, life is just better with out gluten.

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  • About Me

    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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